Norma relacionada
Burundi
Practice Relating to Rule 7. The Principle of Distinction between Civilian Objects and Military Objectives
Burundi’s Regulations on International Humanitarian Law (2007) states: “The parties to an [armed] conflict must in all circumstances distinguish between … military objectives and civilian objects.” 
Burundi, Règlement n° 98 sur le droit international humanitaire, Ministère de la Défense Nationale et des Anciens Combattants, Projet “Moralisation” (BDI/B-05), August 2007, Part I bis, p. 50; see also pp. 2, 15, 31, 35, 40, 52, 63, 80, 82, 85, 92 and 103.
Burundi’s Regulations on International Humanitarian Law (2007) states: “An attack is only permitted against … military objectives.” 
Burundi, Règlement n° 98 sur le droit international humanitaire, Ministère de la Défense Nationale et des Anciens Combattants, Projet “Moralisation” (BDI/B-05), August 2007, Part I bis, p. 9; see also pp. 2, 19, 25, 33, 34, 35, 63 and 85.
The Regulations also states that “only objects used by the enemy in direct support of military operations may be attacked, in order to neutralize or destroy them.” 
Burundi, Règlement n° 98 sur le droit international humanitaire, Ministère de la Défense Nationale et des Anciens Combattants, Projet “Moralisation” (BDI/B-05), August 2007, Part I bis, p. 36.
The Regulations also states:
An attack is legitimate if it is directed against:
1. the belligerent party (that is the party to the conflict);
2. combatants;
3. the armed forces …;
4. a levée en masse (the civilian population of a non-occupied territory which spontaneously takes up arms upon the approach of the enemy);
5. the positions, installations, weapons, vehicles, [and] objectives which, by their nature, location [or] use, contribute to the military effort and … whose total or partial destruction, neutralization or capture, offers a net military advantage in these circumstances. 
Burundi, Règlement n° 98 sur le droit international humanitaire, Ministère de la Défense Nationale et des Anciens Combattants, Projet “Moralisation” (BDI/B-05), August 2007, Part I bis, p. 23; see also Part I bis, p. 9.
Burundi’s Regulations on International Humanitarian Law (2007) states: “Civilian objects may not be attacked.” 
Burundi, Règlement n° 98 sur le droit international humanitaire, Ministère de la Défense Nationale et des Anciens Combattants, Projet “Moralisation” (BDI/B-05), August 2007, Part I bis, p. 19; see also p. 35.
The Regulations also states: “Combatants and military objectives are legitimate targets, [whereas] … civilian objects are not.” 
Burundi, Règlement n° 98 sur le droit international humanitaire, Ministère de la Défense Nationale et des Anciens Combattants, Projet “Moralisation” (BDI/B-05), August 2007, Part I bis, p. 15.
Burundi’s Law on Genocide, Crimes against Humanity and War Crimes (2003) states:
[The following are] considered as war crimes:
B. Other serious violations of the laws and customs applicable in international armed conflicts, within the established framework of international law, namely, any of the following acts:
b) launching deliberate attacks against civilian objects, that is, objects which are not military objectives. 
Burundi, Law on Genocide, Crimes against Humanity and War Crimes, 2003, Article 4(B)(b).
Burundi’s Penal Code (2009) states:
“War crimes” means crimes which are committed as part of a plan or policy or as part of a large-scale commission of such crimes, in particular:
2. … [S]erious violations of the laws and customs applicable in international armed conflict, within the established framework of international law, namely, any of the following acts:
2°. Intentionally directing attacks against civilian objects. 
Burundi, Penal Code, 2009, Article 198(2)(2°).