Norma relacionada
Bosnia and Herzegovina
Practice Relating to Rule 87. Humane Treatment
In 2007, in the Ramić case, the Appellate Panel of the Court of Bosnia and Herzegovina stated that “it is customary law that … persons hors de combat must be treated humanely, regardless of whether the conflict is international or non-international”. 
Bosnia and Herzegovina, Court of Bosnia and Herzegovina, Ramić case, Judgment, 21 November 2007, p. 4.
In 2007, in the Ramić case, the Appellate Panel of the Court of Bosnia and Herzegovina stated that “it is customary law that civilians … must be treated humanely, regardless of whether the conflict is international or non-international”. 
Bosnia and Herzegovina, Court of Bosnia and Herzegovina, Ramić case, Judgment, 21 November 2007, p. 4.
Bosnia and Herzegovina’s Military Instructions (1992) provides that the wounded and sick must be treated humanely. 
Bosnia and Herzegovina, Instructions on the Implementation of the International Law of War in the Armed Forces of the Republic of Bosnia and Herzegovina, Official Gazette of ABiH, No. 2/92, 5 December 1992, Item 14, § 1.
In 1992, the Presidency of the Republika Srpska of Bosnia and Herzegovina made an urgent appeal “to make protection and treatment of all wounded and sick persons possible”. 
Bosnia and Herzegovina, Republika Srpska, Appeal of the Presidency concerning the International Committee of the Red Cross Operations, Pale, 7 June 1992.
Bosnia and Herzegovina’s Criminal Code (2003) states that ordering or committing the following act against a prisoner of war constitutes a war crime: “inhumane treatment”. 
Bosnia and Herzegovina, Criminal Code, 2003, Article 175(a).
In 1992, the Presidency of the Republika Srpska of Bosnia and Herzegovina made an urgent appeal to “treat all imprisoned persons humanely”. 
Bosnia and Herzegovina, Republika Srpska, Appeal of the Presidency concerning the International Committee of the Red Cross Operations, Pale, 7 June 1992.