Norma relacionada
Bosnia and Herzegovina
Practice Relating to Rule 133. Property Rights of Displaced Persons
Since 1997, the Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina has adopted new property laws safeguarding property rights in order to implement the 1995 Agreement on Refugees and Displaced Persons annexed to the Dayton Accords. These laws mainly deal with abandoned property and occupancy rights. It has also adopted instructions, claim forms and information sheets. 
Bosnia and Herzegovina, Federation, Law on Sale of Apartments with Occupancy Rights, 1997; Law on the Cessation of the Application of the Law on Temporary Abandoned Real Property Owned by Citizens, 1998; Law on the Cessation of the Application of the Law on Abandoned Apartments, 1998.
In 1998, the Republika Srpska of Bosnia and Herzegovina adopted a new property law safeguarding property rights in order to implement the 1995 Agreement on Refugees and Displaced Persons annexed to the Dayton Accords. This law mainly deals with abandoned property. It also adopted instructions, claim forms and information sheets. 
Bosnia and Herzegovina, Republika Srpska, Law on the Cessation of the Application of the Law on the Use of Abandoned Property, 1998.
In the Turundžić case before the Human Rights Chamber of the Commission on Human Rights of Bosnia and Herzegovina in 2001, the applicants were citizens of the Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina who held pre-war occupancy rights to apartments in Mostar, but left due to wartime hostilities. They thereafter filed repossession claims with the Commission for Real Property Claims of Displaced Persons and Refugees, which recognized the applicants’ occupancy rights. The applicants’ subsequent enforcement requests to the competent municipal organs went unanswered. The applicants consequently filed applications against the Federation with the Human Rights Chamber for Bosnia and Herzegovina, claiming under the 1950 European Convention on Human Rights respect for the home and peaceful enjoyment of property. The Chamber held that the authorities’ failure to enforce the Commission’s decisions in question constituted an “ongoing interference” with the applicants’ rights to respect for the home and peaceful enjoyment of property. The Chamber ordered the Federation to take all necessary steps to enforce the decisions without further delay, and further awarded compensation. 
Bosnia and Herzegovina, Commission on Human Rights (Human Rights Chamber), Turundžić case, Decision, 8 February 2001.