Norma relacionada
Bosnia and Herzegovina
Practice Relating to Rule 129. The Act of Displacement
Under the Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina’s Criminal Code (1998), “whoever in violation of rules of international law applicable in time of war, armed conflict or occupation … orders displacement” of the civilian population commits a war crime. 
Bosnia and Herzegovina, Federation, Criminal Code, 1998, Article 154(1); see also Article 153 (forcible transfer of children to another group as a part of a genocide campaign).
The Republika Srpska’s Criminal Code (2000) contains the same provision. 
Bosnia and Herzegovina, Republika Srpska, Criminal Code, 2000, Article 433(1); see also Article 432 (forcible transfer of children to another group as a part of a genocide campaign).
Bosnia and Herzegovina’s Criminal Code (2003) criminalizes the following as an act of genocide:
Whoever, with an aim to destroy, in whole or in part, a national, ethnical, racial or religious group, orders perpetration or perpetrates any of the following acts:
e) Forcibly transferring children of the group to another group. 
Bosnia and Herzegovina, Criminal Code, 2003, Article 171(e).
The Criminal Code criminalizes the following act as a crime against humanity:
(1) Whoever, as part of a widespread or systematic attack directed against any civilian population, with knowledge of such an attack, perpetrates any of the following acts:
d) Deportation or forcible transfer of population. 
Bosnia and Herzegovina, Criminal Code, 2003, Article 172(1)(d).
The Criminal Code also states that, in time of war, armed conflict or occupation, ordering or imposing “the dislocation or displacement [of civilians]”, in violation of international law, constitutes a war crime. 
Bosnia and Herzegovina, Criminal Code, 2003, Article 173(1)(d).
In 2007, in the Janković case, the Appellate Panel of the Court of Bosnia and Herzegovina stated that the following elements constituted “forcible transfer of population”:
i) forcible transfer of individuals, by moving them or by [employing] other coercive actions, out of the area where they legally reside to other locations within the state border without any basis under international law and ii) the intention of the perpetrator to forcibly remove individuals, while the intention does not necessarily have to refer to permanent transfer. 
Bosnia and Herzegovina, Court of Bosnia and Herzegovina, Janković case, Judgment, 23 October 2007, p. 14.
In June 1992, the Presidency of the Republika Srpska of Bosnia and Herzegovina appealed that the civilian population be displaced only if imperative military or security reasons so demanded. 
Bosnia and Herzegovina, Republika Srpska, Appeal by the Presidency, 7 June 1992, § 4.