Règle correspondante
Zimbabwe
Practice Relating to Rule 99. Deprivation of Liberty
Section A. General
Zimbabwe’s Constitution (1979), as amended to 2009, states:
CHAPTER III
THE DECLARATION OF RIGHTS
13 Protection of right to personal liberty
(1) No person shall be deprived of his personal liberty save as may be authorised by law …
25 Savings in the event of public emergencies
Notwithstanding the foregoing provisions of this Chapter [III], an Act of Parliament may in accordance with Schedule 2 derogate from certain provisions of the Declaration of Rights in respect of a period of public emergency or a period when a resolution under section 31J(6) is in effect.
26 Interpretation and other savings
(7) No measures taken in relation to a person who is a member of a disciplined force of a country with which Zimbabwe is at war or with which a state of hostilities exists and no law, to the extent that it authorises the taking of such measures, shall be held to be in contravention of the Declaration of Rights.
31J Public emergencies
(1) The President may at any time, by proclamation in the Gazette, declare in relation to the whole of Zimbabwe or any part thereof that–
(a) a state of public emergency exists; or
(b) a situation exists which, if allowed to continue, may lead to a state of public emergency.
(2) A declaration under subsection (1), if not sooner revoked, shall cease to have effect at the expiration of a period of fourteen days beginning with the day of publication of the proclamation in the Gazette unless, before the expiration of that period, the declaration is approved by resolution of the House of Assembly:
Provided that, if Parliament is dissolved during the period of fourteen days, the declaration, unless sooner revoked, shall cease to have effect at the expiration of a period of thirty days beginning with the day of publication of the proclamation in the Gazette unless, before the expiration of that period, the declaration is approved by resolution of the House of Assembly.
(5) Notwithstanding any other provision of this section, the House of Assembly may at any time–
(a) resolve that a declaration under subsection (1) should be revoked; or
(b) whether in passing a resolution under subsection (2) or (4) or subsequently, resolve that a declaration under subsection (1) should relate to such lesser area as the House of Assembly may specify;
and the President shall forthwith, by proclamation in the Gazette, revoke the declaration or provide that the declaration shall relate to such lesser area, as the case may be.
(6) Without prejudice to the provisions of subsections (1) to (5), the House of Assembly may at any time resolve in relation to the whole of Zimbabwe or any part thereof that a situation exists which–
(a) if allowed to continue, may lead to a state of public emergency; and
(b) may require the preventive detention of persons in the interests of defence, public safety or public order. 
Zimbabwe, Constitution, 1979, as amended to 2009, Sections 13(1), 25, 26(7), 31J(1)–(2) and (5)–(6).
The Constitution also states:
SCHEDULE 2
1 Savings in the event of public emergencies
(1) Nothing contained in any law shall be held to be in contravention of section 13, 17, 20, 21, 22 or 23 to the extent that the law in question provides for the taking, during a period of public emergency, of action for the purpose of dealing with any situation arising during that period, and nothing done by any person under the authority of any such law shall be held to be in contravention of any of the said provisions unless it is shown that the action taken exceeded anything which, having due regard to the circumstances prevailing at the time, could reasonably have been thought to be required for the purpose of dealing with the situation.
(2) Nothing contained in any law shall be held to be in contravention of section 13 to the extent that the law in question provides for preventive detention, during a period when a resolution under section 31J(6) is in effect, in the interests of defence, public safety or public order, and nothing done by any person under the authority of any such law shall be held to be in contravention of section 13 unless it is shown that the action taken exceeded anything which, having due regard to the circumstances prevailing at the time, could reasonably have been thought to be required for the purpose of dealing with the situation.
(3) Where a declaration under section 31J(1) or a resolution under section 31J(6) applies only in relation to a part of Zimbabwe, the law in question shall not provide for the taking of action or for preventive detention, as the case may be, in relation to any place outside that part.
2 Preventive detention
(5) No law providing for preventive detention during a period when a resolution under section 31J(6) is in effect shall authorise the detention of a person for a period longer than fourteen days unless the Minister designated for the purpose has issued an order providing for the preventive detention of that person. 
Zimbabwe, Constitution, 1979, as amended to 2009, Schedule 2, Articles 1 and 2(5).
The Constitution further states:
In this Constitution, unless the context otherwise requires–
“period of public emergency” means–
(a) any period when Zimbabwe is engaged in any war and the period immediately following thereon until such date as may be declared by the President, by proclamation in the Gazette, as the end of the period of public emergency caused by that war. 
Zimbabwe, Constitution, 1979, as amended to 2009, Section 113(1)(a).
Zimbabwe’s Geneva Conventions Act (1981), as amended in 1996, punishes “any person, whatever his nationality, who, whether in or outside Zimbabwe, commits any such grave breach of [any of the 1949 Geneva] Conventions”. 
Zimbabwe, Geneva Conventions Act, 1981, as amended in 1996, Section 3(1).
Zimbabwe’s Constitution (2013) states:
Chapter 4 – Declaration of Rights
49. Right to personal liberty
(1) Every person has the right to personal liberty, which includes the right –
(a) not to be detained without trial, and
(b) not to be deprived of their liberty arbitrarily or without just cause.
50. Rights of arrested and detained persons
(7) lf there are reasonable grounds to believe that a person is being detained illegally or if it is not possible to ascertain the whereabouts of a detained person, any person may approach the High Court for an order –
(a) of habeas corpus, that is to say an order requiring the detained person to be released, or to be brought before the court for the lawfulness of the detention to be justified, or requiting the whereabouts of the detained person to be disclosed;
or
(b) declaring the detention to be illegal and ordering the detained person’s prompt release;
and the High Court may make whatever order is appropriate in the circumstances.
(8) An arrest or detention which contravenes this section, or in which the conditions set out in this section are not met, is illegal.
86. Limitation of rights and freedoms
(2) The fundamental rights and freedoms set out in this Chapter may be limited only in terms of a law of general application and to the extent that the limitation is fair, reasonable, necessary and justifiable in a democratic society based on openness, justice, human dignity, equality and freedom, taking into account all relevant factors, including –
(b) the purpose of the limitation, in particular whether it is necessary in the interests of defence, public safety, public order, public morality, public health, regional or town planning or the general public interest;
(3) No law may limit the following rights enshrined in this Chapter, and no person may violate them –
(f) the right to obtain an order of habeas corpus as provided in section 50(7)(a).
87. Limitations during public emergency
(1) In addition to the limitations permitted by section 86, the fundamental rights and freedoms set out in this Chapter may be further limited by a written law providing for measures to deal with situations arising during a period of public emergency, but only to the extent permitted by this section and the Second Schedule.
(4) No law that provides for a declaration of a state of emergency, and no legislative or other measure taken in consequence of such a declaration may –
(a) indemnify, or permit or authorise an indemnity for, the State or any institution or agency of the government at any level, or any other person, in respect of any unlawful act; or
(b) limit any of the rights referred to in section 86(3), or authorise or permit any of those rights to be violated. 
Zimbabwe, Constitution, 2013, Sections 49(1), 50(7)–(8), 86(2)(b) and (3)(f) and 87(1) and (4).