Règle correspondante
Uruguay
Practice Relating to Rule 99. Deprivation of Liberty
Uruguay’s Law on Cooperation with the ICC (2006) states:
A person who commits any of the following acts with the intention to destroy in whole or in part a national, ethnic, religious, political, or trade union group or a group with their own identity based on gender, sexual orientation, cultural or social reasons, age, disability or health, is punished with fifteen to thirty years’ imprisonment:
B) … deprivation of liberty … of one or more members of the group. 
Uruguay, Law on Cooperation with the ICC, 2006, Article 16(B).
The Law also states:
26.2. Persons and objects affected by the war crimes set out in the present provision are persons and objects which international law protects in international or internal armed conflict.
26.3. The following are war crimes:
7. … unlawful confinement. 
Uruguay, Law on Cooperation with the ICC, 2006, Article 26.2 and 26.3.7.
Uruguay’s Law on Cooperation with the ICC (2006) states:
48.3. Within 48 hours of the arrest or, if the person is already deprived of his or her liberty, of properly resolving the previous matter, the Supreme Court of Justice, with the notification of the Prosecutor, carries out a hearing in which:
C) It informs the detainee of the reasons for his or her detention and of the details of the request of surrender. 
Uruguay, Law on Cooperation with the ICC, 2006, Article 48.3.C; see also Article 50.3.A.
In 1989, in a statement before the Human Rights Committee, Uruguay reported that habeas corpus definitely continued to apply in emergency situations. 
Uruguay, Statement before the Human Rights Committee, UN Doc. CCPR/C/SR.877, 30 March 1989, §§ 44 and 49.