Règle correspondante
Chad
Practice Relating to Rule 143. Dissemination of International Humanitarian Law among the Civilian Population
Chad’s Instructor’s Manual (2006) states that a preparatory measure in peacetime is to “make the law of war known among … the population”. 
Chad, Droit international humanitaire, Manuel de l’instructeur en vigueur dans les forces armées et de sécurité, Ministère de la Défense, Présidence de la République, Etat-major des Armées, 2006, p. 91.
Chad’s Emblem Law (2014) states:
The Ministry of Public Health and the Ministry of Defence ensure at all times strict compliance with the rules governing the use of the emblems of the red cross or the red crescent, the denomination “Red Cross” and “Red Crescent” and the distinctive signals. …
These Ministries shall take every appropriate step to prevent misuse, in particular:
- by disseminating the rules in question as widely as possible among the armed forces, the police forces, the administrative authorities and the civilian population;
- by issuing directives to the national civil and military authorities concerning the use of the emblem, in accordance with the [1949] Geneva Conventions and their [1977] Additional Protocols. 
Chad, Emblem Law, 2014, Article 8(1)–(2).
In 2007, in its second periodic report to the Committee on the Rights of the Child, Chad stated:
235. Chad is having to cope with an influx of refugees as a result of the conflicts which broke out in 2003 in Darfur and the Central African Republic.
236. In 2005, the east of the country was sheltering 220,000 refugees from Darfur, 60 per cent of them aged under 18.
237. In the south, Chad is sheltering some 40,000 refugees from the Central African Republic. Some 5,500 refugees are estimated to be living in urban areas. They are from the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Liberia, Sierra Leone and Rwanda, as well as from Sudan and the Central African Republic.
243. It should be noted that “Djanjaweed” incursions and rebel attacks have caused the internal displacement of 115,677 persons in the regions of Wadi Fira (Department of Dar Tama), Ouaddai (Departments of Assongha and Dar Sila), and Salamat (Department of Bahr Azoum). This total is estimated to include 48,578 children of pre-school age and 34,817 of school age (Source: UNHCR/N’Dj., 31 January 2007).
248. Social workers and humanitarian personnel have been trained … in humanitarian law and children’s rights in general. 
Chad, Second periodic report to the Committee on the Rights of the Child, 14 December 2007, UN Doc. CRC/C/TCD/2, submitted 7 June 2007, §§ 235–237, 243 and 248.
In 2007, in its initial report to the Committee against Torture, Chad stated:
Humanitarian law is … taught in the faculty of law and legal techniques. The National School for Administration and the Magistracy, with the technical support of the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), recently drew up a manual entitled “Module of legal training on international human rights standards for the use of the National School for Administration and the Magistracy”, which is currently being tested. 
Chad, Initial report to the Committee against Torture, 22 September 2008, UN Doc. CAT/C/TCD/1, submitted 4 September 2007, § 330.
In 2009, in its written replies to the issues raised by the Human Rights Committee with regard to Chad’s initial report, Chad stated: “Social workers and humanitarian personnel have received training in … humanitarian law and children’s rights in general”. 
Chad, Written replies by the Government of Chad to the Human Rights Committee concerning the list of issues to be taken up in connection with the initial report of Chad, 20 January 2009, UN Doc. CCPR/C/TCD/Q/1/Add.1, submitted 12 January 2009, § 11.
Chad further stated: “[T]eaching on humanitarian law and human rights … is … to be introduced in primary and secondary schools.” 
Chad, Written replies by the Government of Chad to the Human Rights Committee concerning the list of issues to be taken up in connection with the initial report of Chad, 20 January 2009, UN Doc. CCPR/C/TCD/Q/1/Add.1, submitted 12 January 2009, § 87.
Chad also stated:
The recruitment into the army of minors under 18 is officially prohibited by law. Children can nevertheless be found in military camps and among armed groups, although there are no statistics on this. Awareness campaigns have been organized by United Nations agencies and international NGOs with a view to curbing the problem and a children’s parliament has been established to give children a voice, as recommended by the United Nations. 
Chad, Written replies by the Government of Chad to the Human Rights Committee concerning the list of issues to be taken up in connection with the initial report of Chad, 20 January 2009, UN Doc. CCPR/C/TCD/Q/1/Add.1, submitted 12 January 2009, § 47.