Règle correspondante
Chad
Practice Relating to Rule 131. Treatment of Displaced Persons
Section D. Specific needs of displaced women, children and elderly persons
In 2007, in its second periodic report to the Committee on the Rights of the Child, Chad stated:
235. Chad is having to cope with an influx of refugees as a result of the conflicts which broke out in 2003 in Darfur and the Central African Republic.
236. In 2005, the east of the country was sheltering 220,000 refugees from Darfur, 60 per cent of them aged under 18.
237. In the south, Chad is sheltering some 40,000 refugees from the Central African Republic. Some 5,500 refugees are estimated to be living in urban areas. They are from the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Liberia, Sierra Leone and Rwanda, as well as from Sudan and the Central African Republic.
239. In the case of unaccompanied children, arrangements for identification, care, monitoring, family search and family reunification have been put in place in order to protect them against sexual abuse and exploitation … in the camps and the host communities. 
Chad, Second periodic report to the Committee on the Rights of the Child, 14 December 2007, UN Doc. CRC/C/TCD/2, submitted 7 June 2007, §§ 235–237 and 239.
In 2009, in its written replies to the issues raised by the Committee on the Rights of the Child with regard to Chad’s second periodic report, Chad stated:
(a) Information concerning children deprived of a family environment and separated from their parents is available only for the following years:
2007: 658, including 207 refugee children and 451 children recruited or used by armed forces and armed groups and separated from their parents
2008: 59 children recruited or used by armed forces and armed groups and separated from their parents
(b) In 2006, 326 children were placed in 12 institutions throughout the country, while in 2007, 566 children were placed in 19 institutions throughout the country;
(c) Eight children placed with foster families;
(d) Five children have been fully adopted since January 2008, two girls and three boys, including one child adopted abroad. 
Chad, Written replies by the Government of Chad to the Committee on the Rights of the Child concerning the list of issues to be taken up in connection with the second periodic report of Chad, 8 January 2009, UN Doc. CRC/C/TCD/Q/2/Add.1, submitted 7 January 2009, p. 5.
In 2009, in its written replies to the issues raised by the Human Rights Committee with regard to Chad’s initial report, Chad stated:
8. As a result of the conflict in Darfur in 2003, Chad was faced with an influx of Darfur refugees in the east of the country. In 2005 there were 220,000 refugees from Darfur, 60 per cent of whom were under the age of 18. The refugees are cared for by the Government of Chad with the support of the United Nations and international and national refugee organizations. In 2005 Chad signed a memorandum of understanding on the monitoring of separated or unaccompanied Sudanese children with the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC), the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) and the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF).
9. A total of 437 separated and 104 unaccompanied children have been identified and taken into care … Children requesting refugee status are entitled to protection and humanitarian assistance under … international instruments which have been ratified by Chad. Protection and humanitarian assistance are guaranteed to refugees and their children as part of their civil rights and economic, social and cultural rights.
10. Conflict between communities, Janjaweed incursions and rebel attacks have caused the internal displacement of 50,000 persons in the Dar Sila region, 1,981 of them school aged children and 136 children separated from their parents. Protection and humanitarian assistance are provided by United Nations agencies, the Government and national human rights organizations.
11. … [C]hildren … receive basic social and health services. Social workers and humanitarian personnel have received training in listening and counselling techniques, … and children’s rights in general. Play-based activities have been developed to help the children deal with the trauma they have suffered. 
Chad, Written replies by the Government of Chad to the Human Rights Committee concerning the list of issues to be taken up in connection with the initial report of Chad, 20 January 2009, UN Doc. CCPR/C/TCD/Q/1/Add.1, submitted 12 January 2009, §§ 8–11.
In 2012, in its second periodic report to the Human Rights Committee, Chad stated:
76. From 2005 to 2007, a succession of crises at the regional level (in particular the Darfur conflict) and at the national level (insecurity and intercommunity and political tension) caused the internal displacement of some 180,000 persons in the eastern part of Chad, especially in the regions of Ouaddai and Sila. …
78. Between 2007 and 2008, intercommunity fighting led to the forced displacement of some 16,000 Chadians within the country, in particular in the regions of Dar Sila and Ouaddai. Most of the displaced women had suffered rape or other forms of sexual violence.
81. The Government continues to give priority to the safety of refugees [and] internally displaced persons … in Chad. It is true that general security conditions have improved. Since the departure of MINURCAT [UN Mission in the Central African Republic and Chad], the Chadian integrated security force DIS supported by the United Nations has played and continues to play a key role in maintaining security in and around refugee camps and in protecting convoys of displaced persons returning to their villages of origin. The presence of DIS is essential to … reduce the number of acts of sexual and gender-based violence in and around camps.
The Integrated Security Force is divided into six police stations and six police posts
82. Each station contains a safe cell or protection service for women and children whose task is to prevent and investigate sexual offences and domestic violence and to recommend psychosocial, medical and legal care or assistance.
83. DIS has female staff members who have three main responsibilities:
– Sheltering victims of violence;
– Guiding victims towards care facilities;
– Conducting police investigations. 
Chad, Second periodic report to the Human Rights Committee, 28 January 2013, UN Doc. CCPR/C/TCD/2, submitted 20 July 2012, §§ 76, 78 and 81–83.