Règle correspondante
Senegal
Practice Relating to Rule 38. Attacks against Cultural Property
Senegal’s Disciplinary Regulations (1990) provides that soldiers in combat must “spare buildings dedicated to religion, art, science or charitable purposes, and historic monuments, provided they are not being used for military purposes”. 
Senegal, Règlement de Discipline dans les Forces Armées, Décret 90-1159, 12 October 1990, Article 34(1).
Senegal’s Penal Code (1965), as amended in 2007, states that the following constitute war crimes:
b) [O]ther serious violations of the laws and customs applicable in international armed conflict, within the established framework of international law, namely, any of the following acts:
8. launching deliberate attacks against buildings dedicated to religion, education, art, science or charitable purposes [or] historic monuments … , as long as these buildings are not military objectives;
d) …
Other serious violations of the laws and customs applicable in armed conflicts not of an international character, within the established framework of international law, namely, any of the following acts:
4. launching deliberate attacks against buildings dedicated to religion, education, art, science or charitable purposes [or] historic monuments … , as long as these buildings are not military objectives. 
Senegal, Penal Code, 1965, as amended in 2007, Article 431-3(b)(8) and (d)(4).
The Penal Code also states:
Committing an act or activity prohibited by any of the following conventions or protocols constitutes a crime under international law:
1. the 1954 Hague Convention for the Protection of Cultural Property in the Event of Armed Conflict … 
Senegal, Penal Code, 1965, as amended in 2007, Article 431-5(1).