Règle correspondante
Sweden
Practice Relating to Rule 86. Blinding Laser Weapons
In the Ad Hoc Committee on Conventional Weapons of the CDDH, Sweden stated:
It might be thought that the mere suspicion that a new or improved type of weapon might cause greater suffering or have more indiscriminate effects than its predecessor would constitute a basis for serious negotiations on the prohibition of such weapons on humanitarian grounds. It might be argued, for instance, that because laser weapons, if used against personnel, were likely to cause permanent damage to, or a complete loss of eyesight, they should be considered unnecessarily cruel. His delegation was inclined to that opinion and accordingly urged the great Powers to desist from further work in that direction and to agree on rules prohibiting the use of such weapons. If that were not possible, because some countries might consider that laser weapons would prove to be of considerable military value, for instance, in combating attacking missiles, it might still prove possible to negotiate an agreement prohibiting their use against any target other than a military target. It was possible that laser weapons would never be used against personnel because of their relative complexity and high cost, but there could be no certainty of that. It would therefore be worth while prohibiting such use. 
Sweden, Statement at the CDDH, Official Records, Vol. XVI, CDDH/IV/SR.33, 2 June 1976, p. 339, § 6.
At the 25th International Conference of the Red Cross in 1986, Sweden and Switzerland submitted a draft resolution which stated:
The development of laser technology for military use includes a risk that laser equipment of armed forces can be specifically used for antipersonnel purposes on the battlefield, such as causing permanent blindness of human beings, and that such use may be considered already prohibited under existing international law. 
25th International Conference of the Red Cross, Geneva, 23–31 October 1986, Commission I, CI/2.6/PR3, Item 2.6, quoted in Louise Doswald-Beck, “New Protocol on Blinding Laser Weapons”, IRRC, No. 312, 1996, p. 273.
This wording was not retained, and the resolution adopted instead stated that the Conference noted “that some governments have voiced their concern about the development of new weapons technologies the use of which, in certain circumstances, could be prohibited under existing international law”. 
25th International Conference of the Red Cross, Geneva, 23–31 October 1986, Res. VII, § B(6).
In 1987, during debates in the First Committee of the UN General Assembly, Sweden stated: “The use of blinding laser weapons designed to cause permanent blindness would be in clear contravention of fundamental principles of the law of warfare.” It also stated: “The International Community should consider a ban on the use of laser weapons for such purposes.” 
Sweden, Statement before the First Committee of the UN General Assembly, UN Doc. A/C.1/42/PV.3, 12 October 1987, p. 55; Statement before the First Committee of the UN General Assembly, UN Doc. A/C.1/42/PV.34, 12 October 1987, p. 6.
In 1991, during a debate in the First Committee of the UN General Assembly, Sweden stated that it would seek consensus on a resolution on the prohibition of blinding laser weapons at the International Conference of the Red Cross and Red Crescent to be held in 1991 in Budapest (but eventually cancelled). 
Sweden, Statement before the First Committee of the UN General Assembly, UN Doc. A/C.1/46/PV.8, 18 October 1991, p. 28.
In 1992, during a debate in the First Committee of the UN General Assembly, Sweden advocated prohibitions or restrictions on blinding laser weapons. 
Sweden, Statement before the First Committee of the UN General Assembly, UN Doc. A/C.1/47/PV.26, 4 December 1992, p. 19.
In 1994, in a working paper submitted to the Group of Governmental Experts to prepare the First Review Conference of States Parties to the Convention on Certain Conventional Weapons, Sweden proposed the following provision: “It is prohibited to use laser beams as an anti-personnel method of warfare, with the intention or expected result of seriously damaging the eyesight of persons.” 
Sweden, Working paper submitted to the Group of Government Experts to prepare the First Review Conference of States Parties to the Convention on Certain Conventional Weapons, UN Doc. CCW/CONF.I/GE/CRP.3, 16 May 1994.
In 1995, during a debate in the First Committee of the UN General Assembly, Sweden stated that for ten years it had been calling for a ban on blinding laser weapons. 
Sweden, Statement before the First Committee of the UN General Assembly, UN Doc. A/C.1/50/PV.17, 9 October 1995, p. 2.
Upon acceptance of the 1995 Protocol IV to the Convention on Certain Conventional Weapons, Sweden stated:
Sweden intends to apply the Protocol to all types of armed conflict …
Sweden has since long strived for explicit prohibition of the use of blinding lasers which would risk causing permanent blindness to soldiers. Such an effect, in Sweden’s view is contrary to the principle of international law prohibiting means and methods of warfare which cause unnecessary suffering. 
Sweden, Declaration made upon acceptance of Protocol IV to the Convention on Certain Conventional Weapons, 15 January 1997.
At the 25th International Conference of the Red Cross in 1986, Sweden and Switzerland submitted a draft resolution which stated:
The development of laser technology for military use includes a risk that laser equipment of armed forces can be specifically used for antipersonnel purposes on the battlefield, such as causing permanent blindness of human beings, and that such use may be considered already prohibited under existing international law. 
25th International Conference of the Red Cross, Geneva, 23–31 October 1986, Commission I, CI/2.6/PR3, Item 2.6, quoted in Louise Doswald-Beck, “New Protocol on Blinding Laser Weapons”, IRRC, No. 312, 1996, p. 273.
This wording was not retained, and the resolution adopted instead stated that the Conference noted “that some governments have voiced their concern about the development of new weapons technologies the use of which, in certain circumstances, could be prohibited under existing international law”. 
25th International Conference of the Red Cross, Geneva, 23–31 October 1986, Res. VII, § B(6).