Règle correspondante
Sweden
Practice Relating to Rule 8. Definition of Military Objectives
Sweden’s IHL Manual (1991) states:
According to the definition [of military objectives contained in Article 52(2) of the 1977 Additional Protocol I], it is up to the attacker to decide whether the nature, location, purpose or use of the property can admit of its being classified as a military objective and thus as a permissible object of attack. This formulation undeniably gives the military commander great latitude in deciding, but he must also take account of the unintentional damage that may occur. The proportionality rule must always enter into the assessment even though this is not directly stated in the text of Article 52. 
Sweden, International Humanitarian Law in Armed Conflict, with reference to the Swedish Total Defence System, Swedish Ministry of Defence, January 1991, Section 3.2.1.5, p. 54.
Sweden’s IHL Manual (1991) states: “Persons participating in hostilities … are thereby legitimate objectives.” 
Sweden, International Humanitarian Law in Armed Conflict, with reference to the Swedish Total Defence System, Swedish Ministry of Defence, January 1991, Section 3.2.1.5, p. 40.
Sweden’s IHL Manual (1991) states:
How and to what extent a given object can effectively contribute to the adversary’s military operations must be decided by the commander. This need not imply that the property in question is being used by the adversary for a given operation … It may even be a question of means of communication … that indirectly contribute to the adversary’s military operations. 
Sweden, International Humanitarian Law in Armed Conflict, with reference to the Swedish Total Defence System, Swedish Ministry of Defence, January 1991, Section 3.2.1.5, p. 54.
Sweden’s IHL Manual (1991) states:
How and to what extent a given object can effectively contribute to the adversary’s military operations must be decided by the commander. This need not imply that the property in question is being used by the adversary for a given operation … It may even be a question of … energy resources or factories that indirectly contribute to the adversary’s military operations. 
Sweden, International Humanitarian Law in Armed Conflict, with reference to the Swedish Total Defence System, Swedish Ministry of Defence, January 1991, Section 3.2.1.5, p. 54.
Sweden’s IHL Manual (1991) states:
The definition [of military objectives contained in Article 52(2) of the 1977 Additional Protocol I] is intended to apply only to property or objects. Thus, for example, areas of land cannot be included; but this does not prevent an area objective if it is a matter of hindering an enemy advance by means of artillery fire or mining. Attacks on an area are permitted as long as the attack cannot be classified as indiscriminate. 
Sweden, International Humanitarian Law in Armed Conflict, with reference to the Swedish Total Defence System, Swedish Ministry of Defence, January 1991, Section 3.2.1.5, p. 54.