Règle correspondante
Sweden
Practice Relating to Rule 15. The Principle of Precautions in Attack
Sweden’s IHL Manual (1991) states that the precautions in attack “have come about only to protect the civilian population, individual civilians and civilian property in connection with military operations, and particularly when planning, deciding upon and executing attacks”. 
Sweden, International Humanitarian Law in Armed Conflict, with reference to the Swedish Total Defence System, Swedish Ministry of Defence, January 1991, Section 3.2.1.5, p. 68.
In 2010, in its objection to the reservation by the United States of America to the 1980 Protocol III to the Convention on Certain Conventional Weapons, Sweden stated:
It should be underlined that all States are under an obligation to take feasible precautions before an attack. This follows from customary law and from treaty provisions … The duty to take feasible precautions does not remove the obligation to ensure that specific treaty obligations are fulfilled. 
Sweden, Objection to the Reservation by the United States of America to the 1980 Protocol III to the Convention on Certain Conventional Weapons, 2 February 2010, p. 13.
In 2009, during a debate between party leaders in Parliament, Sweden’s Minister for Education and Research stated: “Israel has the right to self-defence but armed defence must be used in such a way so as to avoid civilian casualties.” 
Sweden, Statement by the Minister for Education and Research during a debate between party leaders in Parliament, Parliamentary Protocol 2008/09:56, 14 January 2009, p. 24.
Sweden’s IHL Manual (1991) states that the obligations to take precautions in attack “apply only as far as available resources for collection and processing of information permit”. The manual adds:
A planning commander must, to be able to decide upon an attack, have access to the best possible information about the objective. The decision should be based upon the information available to the commander at the time of deciding. 
Sweden, International Humanitarian Law in Armed Conflict, with reference to the Swedish Total Defence System, Swedish Ministry of Defence, January 1991, Section 3.2.1.5, pp. 70–71.