Règle correspondante
Sweden
Practice Relating to Rule 145. Reprisals
Sweden’s IHL Manual (1991) states:
Reprisals very seldom achieve their intended aim – the return of a wrongdoer to compliance with international law. In most cases, use of reprisals has, instead, led to a serious increase of suffering and losses among civilians. For these reasons, Sweden has, during the [CDDH] and elsewhere, worked for a strict limitation to the right to reprisal. Under Additional Protocol I, reprisals are permitted only against military personnel. A state acceding to Additional Protocol I thereby accepts a limitation of its freedom to employ reprisals. The [Swedish International Humanitarian Law] Committee believes that this involves a considerable humanitarian advance. 
Sweden, International Humanitarian Law in Armed Conflict, with reference to the Swedish Total Defence System, Swedish Ministry of Defence, January 1991, Section 3.5, p. 89.
Sweden’s IHL Manual (1991) states:
Ultimately, responsibility for observance of the system of rules of international humanitarian law, among them the conventions, lies with the government. If in special circumstances the question arises of the use of prohibited means or methods as a measure of reprisal, or even the making of significant exceptions from international humanitarian law for reasons of military necessity, the responsibility for this would fall upon the government. 
Sweden, International Humanitarian Law in Armed Conflict, with reference to the Swedish Total Defence System, Swedish Ministry of Defence, January 1991, Section 4.1, p. 91.
Sweden’s IHL Manual (1991) states:
Under Additional Protocol I, reprisals are permitted only against military personnel. A state acceding to Additional Protocol I thereby accepts a limitation of its freedom to employ reprisals. The [Swedish International Humanitarian Law] Committee believes that this involves a considerable humanitarian advance.
The possibility just recounted – for a party to Additional Protocol I suffering a breach of international law to employ reprisals – is to be considered as a hypothetical case. The Committee strongly discourages such application in view of its manifestly inhuman effect. 
Sweden, International Humanitarian Law in Armed Conflict, with reference to the Swedish Total Defence System, Swedish Ministry of Defence, January 1991, Section 3.5, p. 89.