Règle correspondante
Sweden
Practice Relating to Rule 14. Proportionality in Attack
Sweden’s IHL Manual (1991) considers that the principle of proportionality as contained in Article 51(5)(b) of the 1977 Additional Protocol I reflects customary international law. 
Sweden, International Humanitarian Law in Armed Conflict, with reference to the Swedish Total Defence System, Swedish Ministry of Defence, January 1991, Section 3.2.3, p. 19.
Under Sweden’s Penal Code (1962), as amended in 1998, “initiating an indiscriminate attack knowing that such attack will cause exceptionally heavy losses or damage to civilians or to civilian property” constitutes a crime against international law. 
Sweden, Penal Code, 1962, as amended in 1998, Chapter 22, § 6.
In its written statement submitted to the ICJ in the Nuclear Weapons case in 1995, Sweden stated: “In the case of an attack on a military target, disproportionately substantial damage may not be inflicted on the civilian population or on civilian property.” 
Sweden, Written statement submitted to the ICJ, Nuclear Weapons case, 20 June 1995, p. 3; see also Written statement submitted to the ICJ, Nuclear Weapons (WHO) case, 2 June 1994, p. 3.
In 2007, in an answer to a question in Parliament, the Swedish Minister for Trade stated: “It is prohibited to carry out attacks against military targets that entail injuries to the civilian population that are disproportionally extensive compared to the military value of the attack.” 
Sweden, Answer by the Minister of Trade to a Parliamentary interpellation on the sale of cluster munitions to the United States, 13 November 2007, Parliamentary Protocol 2007/08:23, § 18, Anf. 124.
In 2009, during a debate between party leaders in Parliament, Sweden’s Prime Minister stated:
Let me … say that both Israel and Hamas have violated their respective obligations according to international humanitarian law … Israel has the right to retaliate according to international law but they also have to observe the principle of proportionality[.] 
Sweden, Statement by the Prime Minister during a debate between party leaders in Parliament, Parliamentary Protocol 2008/09:56, 14 January 2009, p. 5.
During the same debate, Sweden’s Minister for Enterprise stated:
Many of us have criticized both Israel and Hamas because of their acts of violations of international law. It is in relation to attacks upon civilians but also about the obligation to give humanitarian access and adhere to the principles of international law on proportionality, precaution and distinction. 
Sweden, Statement by the Minister for Enterprise during a debate between party leaders in Parliament, Parliamentary Protocol 2008/09:56, 14 January 2009, p. 12.
During the same debate, Sweden’s Minister for Education and Research stated:
As has been stated previously, Israel has a responsibility to adhere to the principle of proportionality and distinction when defending itself. …
Israel has the right to self-defence but also an obligation to use methods of proportionality and attack military targets. 
Sweden, Statement by the Minister for Education and Research during a debate between party leaders in Parliament, Parliamentary Protocol 2008/09:56, 14 January 2009, pp. 29–30.
In 2009, in a statement during a meeting with non-governmental organizations operating in Gaza and in the West Bank, Sweden’s Minister for International Development Cooperation stated: “Both Israel and Hamas have acted in breach of humanitarian law. … Israel’s response to Hamas’s firing of rockets has been disproportionate”. 
Statement by the Minister for International Development Cooperation during a meeting with NGOs operating in Gaza and in the West Bank, 15 January 2009.