Règle correspondante
Sweden
Practice Relating to Rule 135. Children
According to Sweden’s IHL Manual (1991), the “general protection of … children” contained in the 1977 Additional Protocol I has the status of customary international law. 
Sweden, International Humanitarian Law in Armed Conflict, with reference to the Swedish Total Defence System, Swedish Ministry of Defence, January 1991, Section 2.2.3, p. 19.
The manual further provides: “The occupying power also has a particular responsibility in the area of child care.” 
Sweden, International Humanitarian Law in Armed Conflict, with reference to the Swedish Total Defence System, Swedish Ministry of Defence, January 1991, Section 6.1.3, p. 123.
In 2008, in its National Strategy for Sweden’s International Peace- and Security-building Activities, Sweden’s Government stated:
Personnel in peace operations shall comply with applicable rules of international human rights and humanitarian law and also adhere to the normative and ethical guidelines specifically formulated for peace operations. … Respect for the norms that govern the protection of civilians and especially women and children should be given special attention[.] 
Sweden, National Strategy for Sweden’s Participation in International Peace- and Security-building Activities, Government Communication 2007/08:51, 13 March 2008, pp. 9–10.
In 2009, in its Plan of Action to implement UN Security Council Resolution 1325/2000 on Women, Peace and Security, Sweden’s Government stated:
[UN Security Council] Resolution 1325 … proclaims that women and children are especially vulnerable in conflicts and demands increased protection. … The implementation of resolution 1325 contributes … to an … increased respect for international humanitarian law. 
Sweden, Plan of Action of the Government for the period 2009–2012 to implement UN Security Council Resolution 1325/2000 on Women, Peace and Security, 10 February 2009, p. 3.
In 2009, in answer to interpellations in Parliament regarding the situation in Gaza, Sweden’s Minister for Foreign Affairs stated: “As in all conflicts, children are especially affected. … Children affected by armed conflict have the right to all possible measures in order to ensure their protection and medical care.” 
Sweden, Answer by the Minister for Foreign Affairs to interpellations 2008/09:252, 267, 268 and 303 in Parliament regarding the situation in Gaza, Parliamentary Chamber Protocol 2008/09:70, 13 February 2009, pp. 4–5.
Sweden’s IHL Manual (1991) provides:
It is also possible for the parties to reach an agreement during a conflict that all acts of war shall cease temporarily within a given part of a conflict area. Such agreements are commonly made to afford protection to civilian populations, and specially to such exposed groups as children. 
Sweden, International Humanitarian Law in Armed Conflict, with reference to the Swedish Total Defence System, Swedish Ministry of Defence, January 1991, Section 3.4.1, p. 84.