Règle correspondante
Sweden
Practice Relating to Rule 106. Conditions for Prisoner-of-War Status
Sweden’s IHL Manual (1991) states:
The basic rule for the conduct of combatants is that they are obliged to distinguish themselves from the civilian population when taking part in an attack or in a military operation in preparation for an attack. For combatants belonging to regular forces, this is no problem, since they are recognizable by their uniforms and normally also by the carrying of weapons. 
Sweden, International Humanitarian Law in Armed Conflict, with reference to the Swedish Total Defence System, Swedish Ministry of Defence, January 1991, Section 3.2.1.4, p. 36.
Sweden’s IHL Manual (1991) states:
Recognizing, however, that there are situations in armed conflicts where, owing to the nature of the hostilities an armed combatant cannot so distinguish himself, he shall retain his status as a combatant, provided that, in such situations, he carries his arms openly:
(a) during each military engagement, and
(b) during such time as he is visible to the adversary while he is engaged in a military deployment preceding the launching of an attack in which he is to participate.
Acts which comply with the requirements of this paragraph shall not be considered as perfidious. 
Sweden, International Humanitarian Law in Armed Conflict, with reference to the Swedish Total Defence System, Swedish Ministry of Defence, January 1991, Section 3.2.1.4.
Sweden’s IHL Manual states: “The rule in Article 44:3 may only be applied by resistance units in enemy occupied or held territory or – in the case of a national liberation movement – within an area controlled by the adversary.” The manual considers that part of the text contained in the second sentence of Article 44(3) of the 1977 Additional Protocol I, namely the description “during the time the combatant is visible to the adversary when participating in military preparation for the launching of an attack in which he is to take part”, is “very unclear, giving rise to varying interpretations”. 
Sweden, International Humanitarian Law in Armed Conflict, with reference to the Swedish Total Defence System, Swedish Ministry of Defence, January 1991, Section 3.2.1.4, p. 37.