Règle correspondante
Philippines
Practice Relating to Rule 110. Treatment and Care of the Wounded, Sick and Shipwrecked
The Military Directive to Commanders (1988) of the Philippines provides:
Medical teams must be made available to provide emergency medical attention … to injured civilians caught in the crossfire …
To demonstrate AFP [Armed Forces of the Philippines] and government concern for the population, military civic action shall be undertaken immediately after the operation. This includes such immediate tasks as providing medical aid to sick and wounded civilians; procuring and distributing food and shelter to displaced persons; and, restoring vital facilities. 
Philippines, Protection and Rehabilitation of Innocent Civilians Affected by AFP Counterinsurgency Operations, Directive to Commanders of Major Services and Area Commands, Office of the Chief of Staff, General Headquarters of the Armed Forces of the Philippines, Ministry of National Defense, 15 July 1988, p. 28, Guidelines 4(d)–(e).
The Military Instructions (1989) of the Philippines provides:
In the aftermath of military or law enforcement operations involving firefight that results in unavoidable casualties, caring for the wounded … which includes our own troops, the enemy and particularly innocent civilians must be a paramount concern of all commanders and troops at all levels. In the scene of the incident, all wounded must be treated with care and their wounds attended by providing them with first aid. 
Philippines, Safety of Innocent Civilians and Treatment of the Wounded and Dead, Directive to Commanders of Major Services and Area Commands, Office of the Chief of Staff, General Headquarters of the Armed Forces of the Philippines, Ministry of National Defence, 6 September 1989, § 4.
The Soldier’s Rules (1989) of the Philippines requires soldiers to care for the wounded and sick. 
Philippines, Soldier’s Rules, in Handbook on Discipline, Annex C(I), General Headquarters, Armed Forces of the Philippines, Camp General Emilio Aguinaldo, Quezon City, 1989, § 5.
The Police Rules of Engagement (1993) of the Philippines states that, after a shoot-out and “in case the suspect has been wounded and disabled, he shall be brought … to the nearest hospital for medical treatment”. 
Philippines, National Police Rules of Engagement, 1993, Section 4(f).
The Philippine Army Soldier’s Handbook on Human Rights and International Humanitarian Law (2006) provides:
After an engagement:
3. Report the circumstances of the death or wounding of the enemies. If it is possible and the circumstances permit, report to your superiors in writing the detailed circumstances of the death or wounding of the enemy.
5. Give immediate medical attention to wounded. Under HR/IHL, it is your duty to treat wounded enemy combatants or crossfire victims. If a wounded enemy or civilian dies long after the battle or in your care, it may be used as an issue against you. Make sure that a barangay [local government] official is assisting you in bringing the wounded to the nearest hospital or clinic. 
Philippines, Philippine Army Soldier’s Handbook on Human Rights and International Humanitarian Law, A Practical Guide for Internal Security Operations, 2006, pp. 60–61, §§ 3 and 5.
The Report on the Practice of the Philippines states:
In an armed conflict where guerilla warfare is the strategy used, distinguishing between civilians and combatants is very difficult. This is precisely the reason why the Philippines have adopted the same rules for both civilians and combatants with regard to the … care of the wounded [and] sick. 
Report on the Practice of the Philippines, 1997, Chapter 5.1.
The Soldier’s Rules (1989) of the Philippines requires soldiers to “care for the wounded and sick, be they friend or foe”. 
Philippines, Soldier’s Rules, in Handbook on Discipline, Annex C(I), General Headquarters, Armed Forces of the Philippines, Camp General Emilio Aguinaldo, Quezon City, 1989, § 5.
(emphasis added)