Règle correspondante
Norway
Practice Relating to Rule 74. Chemical Weapons
Norway’s Penal Code (1902), as amended in 2008, states: “Any person is liable to punishment for a war crime who in connection with an armed conflict … employs … chemical weapons.” 
Norway, Penal Code, 1902, as amended in 2008, § 107(b).
Norway’s Chemical Weapons Act (1994) provides that it is “prohibited to develop, produce, otherwise acquire, stockpile, transfer … chemical weapons in contravention of the Convention of 13 January 1993”. 
Norway, Chemical Weapons Act, 1994, Article 1.
In 1989, Norway co-sponsored a draft resolution in the UN Commission on Human Rights which expressed “grave concern about reports of killing of unarmed Kurdish civilians, in particular by military attacks during 1988 using, inter alia, chemical weapons and causing mass exodus to neighbouring countries”. 
Norway, Draft resolution on the situation of human rights in Iraq, UN Doc. E/CN.4/1989/L.82, 3 March 1989, § 2.
At the First Conference of States Parties to the Chemical Weapons Convention in 1997, Norway reconfirmed its good intentions by once more emphasizing its commitment to global chemical disarmament. 
Norway, Statement at the First Conference of States Parties to the Chemical Weapons Convention, The Hague, 6–23 May 1997.
In 2009, in a statement on “Other Weapons of Mass Destruction” made before the First Committee of the UN General Assembly, the ambassador for disarmament affairs of Norway stated:
Firstly, if we want to achieve a world free of chemical weapons we must continue working to universalise this instrument.
Secondly, it is imperative that existing stocks of chemical weapons are destroyed within agreed time limits. We encourage countries concerned to do their outmost in this respect. 
Norway, Statement on “Other Weapons of Mass Destruction” made before the First Committee of the UN General Assembly, 16 October 2009.