Règle correspondante
Sri Lanka
Practice Relating to Rule 142. Instruction in International Humanitarian Law within Armed Forces
Sri Lanka’s Geneva Conventions Act (2006) reproduces the following from the 1949 Geneva Convention IV:
The High Contracting Parties undertake, in time of peace as in time of war, to disseminate the text of the present Convention as widely as possible in their respective countries, and in particular, to include the study thereof in their programmes of military and, if possible, civil instruction, so that the principles thereof may become known to the entire population.
Any [c]ivilian[,] military, police or other authorities, who in time of war assume responsibilities in respect of protected persons, must possess the text of the Convention and be specially instructed as to its provisions. 
Sri Lanka, Geneva Conventions Act, 2006, Schedule IV: Article 144; see also Schedule III: Article 127.
In 2008, in its initial report to the Committee on the Rights of the Child under the 2000 Optional Protocol on the Involvement of Children in Armed Conflict, Sri Lanka stated:
36. The former Special Representative of the [UN] Secretary-General on Children and Armed Conflict Mr. Olara Otunnu was invited by the Government to visit Sri Lanka in May 1998, to add strength to the advocacy campaign against child recruitment. During his meeting with the LTTE [Liberation Tigers of Tamil Eelam] he raised several issues concerning the protection, rights and welfare of children affected by the ongoing conflict. The LTTE made the following commitments in relation to children in armed conflict to Mr. Otunnu during his meeting with the LTTE[:]
(d) During his visit Mr Otunnu stressed the importance of all parties including the non-State sector, observing the [1989] Convention [on] the Rights of the Child. He urged the LTTE to make public their respect of the principles and provisions of the Convention. However, the LTTE did indicate their willingness, to enable their cadres to receive information and instructions on the provisions of the Convention;
37. These commitments were not implemented by the LTTE. 
Sri Lanka, Initial report to the Committee on the Rights of the Child under the Optional Protocol on the Involvement of Children in Armed Conflict, 15 February 2010, UN Doc. CRC/C/OPAC/LKA/1, submitted 16 June 2008, §§ 36(d) and 37.
[footnote in original omitted]
In 2009, in its combined third and fourth periodic reports to the Committee against Torture, Sri Lanka stated:
54. Article 10 of the [1984] Convention [against Torture] requires education and information regarding the prohibition of torture to be disseminated amongst public officials.
55. The Police and the Army has Human Rights Directorates whose main function is to disseminate information to all its [personnel] with regard to carrying out their duties in accordance with human rights and humanitarian law. The Navy and the Air Force also has sub-directorates which [perform] … a similar task.
56. Training Programmes ha[ve] been conducted … [with] the Police as well as the Armed Forces with the assistance of the ICRC and the Institute of Human Rights on the duties and obligations of Armed Forces personnel in relation to their accountability and responsibility to maintain transparency in the performance of their duties involving the arrest and detention of suspects. 
Sri Lanka, Combined third and fourth periodic reports to the Committee against Torture, 23 September 2010, UN Doc. CAT/C/LKA/3-4, submitted 17 August 2009, Annex, §§ 54–56; see also § 31 of the report.