Règle correspondante
Italy
Practice Relating to Rule 145. Reprisals
Section F. Limitation of reprisals by principles of humanity
Italy’s IHL Manual (1991), in the part dealing with reprisals, states:
The Italian laws of war, which are modelled upon the principles of civilization and humanity as much as it is permitted by military necessity, provides for the humane treatment of enemy combatants, wounded or prisoners, as well as of the civilian population, even in cases in which there is no special obligation under international law to do so. 
Italy, Manuale di diritto umanitario, Introduzione e Volume I, Usi e convenzioni di Guerra, SMD-G-014, Stato Maggiore della Difesa, I Reparto, Ufficio Addestramento e Regolamenti, Rome, 1991, Vol. I, § 28.
In the Kappler case in 1948, dealing with the Ardeatine Caves massacre during the Second World War, the Military Tribunal of Rome stated:
Reprisals are subject to a general limitation which consists in the duty not to violate those rights intended to safeguard fundamental needs. This principle … now finds clear expression in the preamble of the Hague Convention … where the activities of States are set a limit by “the principles of the law of nations, as they result from the usages established between civilized nations, from the laws of humanity and the requirements of the public conscience”. 
Italy, Military Tribunal of Rome, Kappler case, Judgment, 20 July 1948.
In its judgment in the Priebke case in 1996, the Military Tribunal of Rome, with regard to the principle of proportionality to which reprisals were subject, stated:
This is confirmed by the general limit on States’ freedom to act, fixed by international custom and recalled in the preamble to the Hague Convention of 1907 which prohibits injuring fundamental rights established by “ius gentium”, by the customs of civilized States, by the laws of humanity and by the exigencies of public conscience. 
Italy, Military Tribunal of Rome, Priebke case, Judgment in Trial of First Instance, 1 August 1996, Section 7.
In its judgment in the Hass and Priebke case in 1997, the Military Tribunal of Rome stated that actions taken by way of reprisals could never violate the fundamental and primary requirements of humanity and public conscience. 
Italy, Military Tribunal of Rome, Hass and Priebke case, Judgment in Trial of First Instance, 22 July 1997, Section 4.
The Report on the Practice of Italy, having discussed the decisions in the Schintlholzer, Priebke, and Hass and Priebke cases, concludes that it is the opinio juris of Italy that States acting by way of reprisal could never violate the general limit fixed to their actions by customary law and by the preamble to the 1907 Hague Convention (IV). 
Report on the Practice of Italy, 1997, Chapter 2.9.