Règle correspondante
Georgia
Practice Relating to Rule 151. Individual Responsibility
Georgia’s Law on the Status of Military Servicemen (1998) states: “A military serviceman is subject to … criminal liability taking into account the nature and severity of the committed offences.” 
Georgia, Law on the Status of Military Servicemen, 1998, Article 24(1).
Georgia’s Criminal Code (1999), in a part entitled “Crimes against peace and security of mankind and international humanitarian law”, provides a list of punishable offences such as: “genocide” (Article 407); “crimes against humanity” (Article 408); “mercenaries” (Article 410); “wilful breaches of norms of international humanitarian law committed in armed conflict” (Article 411); “wilful breaches of norms of international humanitarian law committed in international or internal armed conflict with the threat to health or causing bodily injury” (Article 412); and “other breaches of norms of international humanitarian law” (Article 413), the latter including “any other war crime provided for in the [1998 ICC Statute]”. 
Georgia, Criminal Code, 1999, Articles 407–408 and 410–413.
For some of these offences, the Code specifies that the acts be committed “in an international or internal armed conflict”. 
Georgia, Criminal Code, 1999, Articles 411–412.
Georgia’s Law on the Status of Military Servicemen (1998) states: “A military serviceman is subject to … civil … liability taking into account the nature and severity of the committed offences.” 
Georgia, Law on the Status of Military Servicemen, 1998, Article 24(1).