Règle correspondante
Canada
Practice Relating to Rule 140. The Principle of Reciprocity
Canada’s LOAC Manual (1999) provides:
The principle of reciprocity refers to the premise that all should be treated as you would like to be treated. Compliance with the LOAC [law of armed conflict] is not only required by law, it is also to our operational advantage. 
Canada, The Law of Armed Conflict at the Operational and Tactical Level, Office of the Judge Advocate General, 1999, p. 2-3, § 18; see also Glossary, p. GL-16.
The manual further states:
A party to an international armed conflict is bound to comply with the LOAC even if an adverse party breaches the law. Compliance with the law by one party is a strong inducement for the adverse party to comply with the law. 
Canada, The Law of Armed Conflict at the Operational and Tactical Level, Office of the Judge Advocate General, 1999, p. 15-1, § 5.
Canada’s Code of Conduct (2001) provides: “CF [Canadian Force] personnel will treat detained persons properly regardless of how CF personnel may have been treated while in the hands of opposing forces.” 
Canada, Code of Conduct for CF Personnel, Office of the Judge Advocate General, 4 June 2001, Rule 6, § 12.
The Code of Conduct further stresses: “There is no exception to your obligation to follow Canadian law even when confronted with an opposing force which refuses to comply with the Law of Armed Conflict.” 
Canada, Code of Conduct for CF Personnel, Office of the Judge Advocate General, 4 June 2001, Rule 11, § 8.
Canada’s LOAC Manual (2001) states: “The principle of reciprocity refers to the premise that all should be treated as you would like to be treated. Compliance with the LOAC is not only required by law, it is also to our operational advantage.” 
Canada, The Law of Armed Conflict at the Operational and Tactical Levels, Office of the Judge Advocate General, 13 August 2001, § 204.7.
In its chapter entitled “Preventative and enforcement measures and the role of protecting powers”, the manual further states:
A party to an international armed conflict is bound to comply with the LOAC even if an adverse party breaches the law. Compliance with the law by one party is a strong inducement for the adverse party to comply with the law. As a practical matter, if one party treats PWs [prisoners of war] properly or confines its attacks to military objectives, the adverse party is less likely to be tempted to breach the law. 
Canada, The Law of Armed Conflict at the Operational and Tactical Levels, Office of the Judge Advocate General, 13 August 2001, § 1502.4.
In its glossary, the manual states:
The principle of reciprocity refers to the old saying, “Treat others the way you would like to be treated”. Compliance with the LOAC is mandatory. If one party to an armed conflict scrupulously complies with the LOAC, there is a greater chance that the other side will do so as well. 
Canada, The Law of Armed Conflict at the Operational and Tactical Levels, Office of the Judge Advocate General, 13 August 2001, Glossary, p. GL-16.
Canada’s Code of Conduct (2005) provides: “CF [Canadian Forces] personnel will treat detained persons properly regardless of how CF personnel may have been treated while in the hands of opposing forces.” 
Canada, Code of Conduct for CF Personnel, Office of the Judge Advocate General, 2005, Rule 6, § 12.
The Code of Conduct further states: “There is no exception to your obligation to follow Canadian law even when confronted with an opposing force which refuses to comply with the Law of Armed Conflict.” 
Canada, Code of Conduct for CF Personnel, Office of the Judge Advocate General, 2005, Rule 11, § 8.