Règle correspondante
Canada
Practice Relating to Rule 110. Treatment and Care of the Wounded, Sick and Shipwrecked
Canada’s LOAC Manual (1999) states that the 1977 Additional Protocol I “also contains provisions amplifying the obligation to care for persons protected by [the 1949 Geneva Convention I] and [the 1949 Geneva Convention II]” and that “the innovation of [the 1977 Additional Protocol I] in this area is to extend the scope of the earlier Conventions so that civilians as well as military personnel are entitled to protection”. 
Canada, The Law of Armed Conflict at the Operational and Tactical Level, Office of the Judge Advocate General, 1999, p. 9-1, § 2.
The manual also provides: “The wounded, sick and shipwrecked shall not be left without proper medical care.” 
Canada, The Law of Armed Conflict at the Operational and Tactical Level, Office of the Judge Advocate General, 1999, p. 9-1, § 18.
In the case of non-international armed conflicts, the manual states that “after an engagement and whenever circumstances permit, all possible steps must be taken without delay … to ensure … adequate care” of the wounded, sick and shipwrecked”. 
Canada, The Law of Armed Conflict at the Operational and Tactical Level, Office of the Judge Advocate General, 1999, p. 17-4, § 32.
Canada’s Code of Conduct (2001) provides: “In all circumstances [the wounded, sick and shipwrecked] shall … receive, to the fullest extent practicable and with the least possible delay, the medical care and attention required by their condition.” 
Canada, Code of Conduct for CF Personnel, Office of the Judge Advocate General, 4 June 2001, Rule 7, § 1.
Canada’s LOAC Manual (2001) states in its chapter on the treatment of the wounded, sick and shipwrecked:
902. General
2.[sic] The two major treaties in this area are the Geneva Convention for the Amelioration of the Condition of the Wounded and Sick in Armed Forces in the Field (GI) and the Geneva Convention for the Amelioration of the Condition of Wounded, Sick and Shipwrecked Members of Armed Forces at Sea (GII). Additional Protocol I to the Geneva Conventions (AP I) also contains provisions amplifying the obligation to care for persons protected by GI and GII. [T]he innovation of AP I in this area is to extend the scope of the earlier Conventions so that civilians as well as military personnel are entitled to protection.
904. Collection of wounded, sick and shipwrecked
1. Following an engagement, parties to a conflict are obliged to take all possible measures to search for and collect without delay the wounded, sick and shipwrecked.
2. The parties to a conflict must protect the wounded, sick and shipwrecked from pillage and ill-treatment and ensure their adequate care …
907. Treatment of the wounded, sick and shipwrecked
1. The wounded, sick and shipwrecked are to be protected, respected, treated humanely and cared for by the Detaining Power without any adverse discrimination.
2. … They shall not be … left without proper medical care and attention or exposed to conditions, which might result in contagion or infection. The term “wounded, sick and shipwrecked”, includes civilians.
913. Obligation when compelled to abandon wounded and sick
1. In land warfare, a belligerent compelled to abandon its wounded and sick is obliged, so far as military considerations permit, to leave medical personnel and equipment to care for them. Their presence does not, however, exempt the Detaining Power from providing any additional assistance that may be necessary. 
Canada, The Law of Armed Conflict at the Operational and Tactical Levels, Office of the Judge Advocate General, 13 August 2001, §§ 902, 904, 907 and 913.1.
In its chapter on non-international armed conflicts, the manual states:
By Common Article 3, the parties to a non-international armed conflict occurring in the territory of a party to the Conventions are obliged to apply, as a minimum, the following provisions:
b. The wounded and sick shall be collected and cared for. 
Canada, The Law of Armed Conflict at the Operational and Tactical Levels, Office of the Judge Advocate General, 13 August 2001, § 1708.1.
In the same chapter, the manual further states: “After any engagement and whenever circumstances permit, all possible steps must be taken without delay to search for and collect the wounded, sick and shipwrecked … and ensure their adequate care.” 
Canada, The Law of Armed Conflict at the Operational and Tactical Levels, Office of the Judge Advocate General, 13 August 2001, § 1718.
Canada’s Code of Conduct (2005) provides:
All the wounded and sick, whether friend or foe, shall be respected and protected. In all circumstances they shall be treated humanely and shall receive, to the fullest extent practicable and with the least possible delay, the medical care and attention required by their condition. There shall be no distinction among them based on any grounds other than medical ones. 
Canada, Code of Conduct for CF Personnel, Office of the Judge Advocate General, 2005, Rule 7, § 1.
In 2010, in the Semrau case, Canada’s General Court Martial found that a member of the Canadian Operational Mentor and Liaison Team (OMLT) who had killed a wounded insurgent in Afghanistan in 2008 had thereby breached Canada’s Code of Service Discipline. The General Court Martial stated:
The code of conduct for CF [Canadian Forces] personnel clearly states that we must offer assistance to wounded enemies that do not pose a threat to us. The code of conduct was taught to every OMLT member and was part of the soldier’s card issued to every OMLT member. 
Canada, General Court Martial, Semrau case, Reasons for Sentence, 5 October 2010, § 10.
Canada’s LOAC Manual (1999) states: “Only urgent medical requirements will justify any priority in treatment among those who are sick and wounded.” 
Canada, The Law of Armed Conflict at the Operational and Tactical Level, Office of the Judge Advocate General, 1999, p. 9-2, §§ 19–20.
(emphasis added)
Canada’s Code of Conduct (2001) states: “There shall be no distinction among [the wounded, sick and shipwrecked] based on any grounds other than medical ones … Only medical reasons will determine the priority of treatment.” 
Canada, Code of Conduct for CF Personnel, Office of the Judge Advocate General, 4 June 2001, Rule 7, §§ 1 and 4.
(emphasis added)
Canada’s LOAC Manual (2001) states in its chapter on the treatment of the wounded, sick and shipwrecked:
907. Treatment of the wounded, sick and shipwrecked
1. The wounded, sick and shipwrecked are to be protected, respected, treated humanely and cared for by the Detaining Power without any adverse discrimination.
2. … The term “wounded, sick and shipwrecked”, includes civilians.
908. Priority of treatment
1. Only urgent medical requirements will justify any priority in treatment among those who are sick and wounded.
2. Regardless of the party to which they belong, or whether they are combatants or non-combatants, the wounded, sick and shipwrecked are to be respected and protected without any adverse discrimination. 
Canada, The Law of Armed Conflict at the Operational and Tactical Levels, Office of the Judge Advocate General, 13 August 2001, §§ 907–908.
Canada’s Prisoner of War Handling and Detainees Manual (2004) states:
As a matter of law, wounded PW [prisoners of war] are to receive the same medical treatment as Canadian casualties with priorities for treatment and evacuation being allocated solely according to medical criteria. 
Canada, Prisoner of War Handling, Detainees, Interrogation and Tactical Questioning in International Operations, B-GJ-005-110/FP-020, National Defence Headquarters, 1 August 2004, p. 3B-1, § B001.1.
Canada’s Code of Conduct (2005) states: “There shall be no distinction among [the wounded and sick] based on any grounds other than medical ones.” 
Canada, Code of Conduct for CF Personnel, Office of the Judge Advocate General, 2005, Rule 7, § 1.
The Code of Conduct further states: “Only medical reasons will determine the priority of treatment.” 
Canada, Code of Conduct for CF Personnel, Office of the Judge Advocate General, 2005, Rule 7, § 4.