Règle correspondante
Burundi
Practice Relating to Rule 49. War Booty
Burundi’s Regulations on International Humanitarian Law (2007) states:
Captured enemy military objects (with the exception of means of identification, medical and religious objects, and objects necessary for clothing, food and drink and the protection of the captured personnel) become war booty (e.g. important military objects taken from the captured enemy military personnel, other material such as weapons, means of transport [or] objects located in warehouses). 
Burundi, Règlement n° 98 sur le droit international humanitaire, Ministère de la Défense Nationale et des Anciens Combattants, Projet “Moralisation” (BDI/B-05), August 2007, Part I bis, p. 25; see also Part I bis, pp. 10–11 and 24..
The Regulations also states: “All … pieces of equipment … , weapons and all documents of military interest (maps, regulations, written orders, telecommunication codes, plans …) are considered as ‘war booty’…”. 
Burundi, Règlement n° 98 sur le droit international humanitaire, Ministère de la Défense Nationale et des Anciens Combattants, Projet “Moralisation” (BDI/B-05), August 2007, Part I bis, p. 85; see also Part I bis, pp. 10–11 and 24.
The Regulations further states: “Medical material and establishments captured from enemy units must be reserved for the care of the wounded and sick.” 
Burundi, Règlement n° 98 sur le droit international humanitaire, Ministère de la Défense Nationale et des Anciens Combattants, Projet “Moralisation” (BDI/B-05), August 2007, Part I bis, p. 15; see also Part I bis, pp. 11 and 25.
The Regulations also provides: “The material of field hospitals may never be confiscated, even if there are no wounded people present. … [E]nemy medical transport (jeep, ambulance, truck, helicopter …) may not be requisitioned, captured or utilized for armed operations if it is transporting wounded [personnel].” 
Burundi, Règlement n° 98 sur le droit international humanitaire, Ministère de la Défense Nationale et des Anciens Combattants, Projet “Moralisation” (BDI/B-05), August 2007, Part I bis, p. 84.