Règle correspondante
Australia
Practice Relating to Rule 113. Treatment of the Dead
Section A. Respect for the dead
Australia’s Defence Force Manual (1994) provides:
The remains of the dead, regardless of whether they are combatants, noncombatants, protected persons or civilians, are to be respected, in particular their honour, family rights, religious convictions and practices and manners and customs. At all times they shall be humanely treated. 
Australia, Manual on Law of Armed Conflict, Australian Defence Force Publication, Operations Series, ADFP 37 – Interim Edition, 1994, § 998.
Australia’s LOAC Manual (2006) states:
The remains of the dead, regardless of whether they are combatants, non-combatants, protected persons or civilians are to be respected, in particular their honour, family rights, religious convictions and practices and manners and customs. At all times they shall be humanely treated. 
Australia, The Manual of the Law of Armed Conflict, Australian Defence Doctrine Publication 06.4, Australian Defence Headquarters, 11 May 2006, § 9.103.
The LOAC Manual (2006) replaces both the Defence Force Manual (1994) and the Commanders’ Guide (1994).
Australia’s War Crimes Act (1945) states: “The expression ‘war crime’ includes the following: … cannibalism … [and] mutilation of the dead”. 
Australia, War Crimes Act, 1945, Section 3(xxxiv) and (xxxv).
Australia’s ICC (Consequential Amendments) Act (2002) incorporates in the Criminal Code the war crimes defined in the 1998 ICC Statute, including “outrages upon personal dignity” of the bodies of dead persons in both international and non-international armed conflicts. 
Australia, ICC (Consequential Amendments) Act, 2002, Schedule 1, §§ 268.58(2) and 268.74(2).
In 1945, in the Takehiko case, an Australian Military Court sentenced the accused, a Japanese soldier, for “mutilating the dead body of a prisoner of war” and for “cannibalism”. 
Australia, Military Court at Wewak, Takehiko case, Judgment, 30 November 1945.
In 1946, in the Tisato case, an Australian Military Court found the accused, a Japanese soldier, guilty of “cannibalism”. The prosecution in this case alleged that several prisoners had been killed and that their flesh had been eaten. 
Australia, Military Court at Rabaul, Tisato case, Judgment, 2 April 1946.