Règle correspondante
Australia
Practice Relating to Rule 106. Conditions for Prisoner-of-War Status
Section A. Distinction from the civilian population
Australia’s Defence Force Manual (1994) provides that combatants must “have a fixed distinctive sign recognisable at a distance and carry arms openly … Combatants are normally expected to distinguish themselves from the civilian population by wearing a uniform.” 
Australia, Manual on Law of Armed Conflict, Australian Defence Force Publication, Operations Series, ADFP 37 – Interim Edition, 1994, §§ 512–513.
Australia’s LOAC Manual (2006) states:
5.12 … Where [combatants] are not members of the armed forces, they must also have a fixed distinctive sign recognisable at a distance and carry arms openly.
5.13 … A member of the armed forces does not lose combatant status merely by operating covertly or as a guerrilla. That is, while combatants are normally expected to distinguish themselves from the civilian population by wearing a uniform, the LOAC recognises that they do not have to wear a uniform on operations to retain their status as combatants. This is conditional on combatants who cannot so distinguish themselves because of the nature of hostilities, openly carrying arms during:
• each military engagement, and
• at such times as they are visible to the adversary while engaged in a military deployment preceding the launching of an attack in which they are to participate. 
Australia, The Manual of the Law of Armed Conflict, Australian Defence Doctrine Publication 06.4, Australian Defence Headquarters, 11 May 2006, §§ 5.12–5.13.
The LOAC Manual (2006) replaces both the Defence Force Manual (1994) and the Commanders’ Guide (1994).