Règle correspondante
The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia
Practice Relating to Rule 159. Amnesty
In October 2001, the Government of the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia confirmed its intention “to grant amnesty to the members of the so-called NLA [National Liberation Army] (UCK) who voluntarily surrendered their weapons during the NATO operation ‘Essential Harvest’”. The President of the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia stated that this would initiate a process of reintegration of those who did not commit crimes and that the amnesty would allow the process of return of the security forces of the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia in the regions that were temporarily out of their control. However, he stressed that “the amnesty does not refer to those who committed war crimes and crimes against humanity, torture and murder of civilians, ethnic cleansing, demolition of religious buildings and other acts for which the International Tribunal for former Yugoslavia is responsible”. 
The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Statement by the President, 8 October 2001.
Members of the NLA welcomed the amnesty but added that it should be given force of law, and demanded the release of rebel prisoners. 
BBC News, 12 October 2001.
In October 2001, the Government of the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia confirmed its intention “to grant amnesty to the members of the so-called NLA [National Liberation Army] (UCK) who voluntarily surrendered their weapons during the NATO operation ‘Essential Harvest’”. The President of the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia stated that this would initiate a process of reintegration of those who did not commit crimes and that the amnesty would allow the process of return of the security forces of the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia in the regions that were temporarily out of their control. However, he stressed that “the amnesty does not refer to those who committed war crimes and crimes against humanity, torture and murder of civilians, ethnic cleansing, demolition of religious buildings and other acts for which the International Tribunal for former Yugoslavia is responsible”. 
the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Statement by the President, 8 October 2001.
Members of the NLA welcomed the amnesty but added that it should be given force of law, and demanded the release of rebel prisoners. 
BBC News, 12 October 2001.