Related Rule
Sri Lanka
Practice Relating to Rule 105. Respect for Family Life
Sri Lanka’s Prevention of Terrorism (Surrendees Care and Rehabilitation) Regulations (2011) states:
10. …
(3) Where a person under eighteen years of age –
(a) who … has been forcibly recruited as a combatant in an armed conflict … or
(b) who has committed or is suspected of having committed an offence during any period in which he … was forcibly recruited as a combatant in an armed conflict … or
(c) who through fear of threats or reprisals by any party to the said armed conflict, or who through fear of … being forcibly recruited as a combatant in an armed conflict …
surrenders to, or is arrested by, any police officer or any member of the armed forces or surrenders to any public officer or any other person or body of persons authorized by the President in that behalf, such police officer or member of the armed forces or public officer or other person or body of person authorized by the President, shall record the statement of such child surrendee and the circumstances in which such child surrendee surrendered or was arrested.
14. (1) Where the child surrendee has been accommodated in a Protective Child Accommodation Centre, the Magistrate shall … determine … with the assistance of the police –
(a) whether such child surrendee should be returned to the charge, care and custody of his parents or guardians;
(b) whether such child surrendee should be accommodated for a period not exceeding one year in a Protective Child Accommodation Centre under the care and supervision of the Provincial Commissioner of Probation and Child care Services; or
(c) whether such child surrendee should be place[d] in a “Protective Child Rehabilitation Centre”, for a period not exceeding one year:
Provided that, where there is evidence that the child surendee has committed an offence during any period in which he was recruited as a combatant, the Magistrate shall place him in a Protective Child Rehabilitation Centre for period not exceeding one year:
(2) (a) In arriving at the determination referred to in paragraph (1) the Magistrate shall have regard –
(i) to the necessity to ensure the protection and the best interests of the child surrendee;
and (ii) [to] the need to effect family reunification or placement within the extended family, taking into consideration the necessity to ensure at all times, the safety of the child surrendee and his family. 
Sri Lanka, Prevention of Terrorism (Surrendees Care and Rehabilitation) Regulations, 2011, Article 10(3) and 14(1)–(2)(a).
In 2008, in its combined third and fourth periodic reports to the Committee on the Rights of the Child, Sri Lanka stated:
345. The Government is finalizing an amendment to Emergency Regulations to deal with the situation of child surrendees – Emergency (Miscellaneous Provisions and Powers) Regulation No. 1 of 2005. The amendment will provide for … [their] appearance before a Magistrate …
346. The Magistrate is required to make a determination regarding the placement of the child … with a view to effecting family reunification or placing him or her with extended family having due regard to the safety of the child and family. 
Sri Lanka, Combined third and fourth periodic reports to the Committee on the Rights of the Child, 20 January 2010, UN Doc. CRC/C/LKA/3-4, submitted 24 October 2008, §§ 345–346.
In 2009, in its combined third and fourth periodic reports to the Committee against Torture, Sri Lanka stated:
70. His Excellency the President, by Regulation dated 12 September 2006, appointed a Commissioner General of Rehabilitation (CGR) who is entrusted with specific responsibilities in relation to all “surrendees” of the ongoing conflict which include adults and children. …
71. In terms of this Regulation, the CGR in consultation with the district secretary, Provincial Commissioner of Probation and Child Care and Services and the NCPA [National Child Protection Authority] will identify protective accommodation and rehabilitation centres for the purpose of receiving Child surrendees. …
72. … An immediate step at the centre is to reunite such surrendees particularly the children with their parents. 
Sri Lanka, Combined third and fourth periodic reports to the Committee against Torture, 23 September 2010, UN Doc. CAT/C/LKA/3-4, submitted 17 August 2009, §§ 70–72.
In 2012, in a section entitled “Theme area: Human Rights” of its National Plan of Action to Implement the Recommendations of the Lessons Learnt and Reconciliation Commission, which also includes a section entitled “Theme area: International Humanitarian Law Issues”, Sri Lanka’s Government stated:
Recommendation
9.78, 9.82 – Examine on a case-by-case basis the cases relating to young LTTE [Liberation Tigers of Tamil Eelam] suspects with a view to instituting legal action without delay or rehabilitating and/or releasing them. Ensure that no sooner than they complete the rehabilitation program, children be allowed to live with their families …
Activity
This concern has been fully addressed with large numbers pursuing academic activities followed by reunification with their families. 
Sri Lanka, Government, National Plan of Action to Implement the Recommendations of the Lessons Learnt and Reconciliation Commission (LLRC), 26 July 2012, p. 5.
In 2012, in its fifth periodic report to the Human Rights Committee, Sri Lanka stated:
42. Remarkable progress has also been made with regard to the rehabilitation and reintegration of ex-combatants. …
45. … As of 1 October 2012, 10,985 persons, which included 594 LTTE [Liberation Tigers of Tamil Eelam] child soldiers have been rehabilitated and reintegrated into society. … It is to be noted that the child soldiers released were afforded the opportunity of a formal education and restored to their families. …
46. Particular attention was given to the 594 child soldiers who surrendered. A special rehabilitation programme was organised with assistance from UNICEF. … The child beneficiaries were reunited with their families within one year …
47. The offer of participating in a programme of rehabilitation is available to a LTTE suspect, in detention or subject to legal process. …
48. Attention was paid to reunification of families, with married ex-combatants being given the opportunity to re-join their spouses, children and parents at special rehabilitation centres called “Peace Villages”. This enabled many beneficiaries to continue their rehabilitation without any disruption to their family life. A special Protective Accommodation and Rehabilitation Centre [was] established at Kaithady in Jaffna to cater to the reunification of married beneficiaries as well. 
Sri Lanka, Fifth periodic report to the Human Rights Committee, 31 January 2013, UN Doc. CCPR/C/LKA/5, submitted 29 October 2012, §§ 42 and 45–48; see also § 299.