Practice Relating to Rule 131. Treatment of Displaced Persons

Note: For practice concerning access for humanitarian relief to civilians in need, see Rule 55.
Constitution of the IOM
Article 1(1)(b) of the 1953 Constitution of the IOM states that the purpose and functions of the IOM shall be
to concern itself with the organized transfer of refugees, displaced persons and other individuals in need of international migration services for whom arrangement may be made between the Organization and the States concerned, including those States undertaking to receive them. 
Constitution of the International Organization for Migration, Brussels, as adopted by a resolution dated 5 December 1951, 19 October 1953, as amended on 20 May 1987, Article 1(1)(b).
Kampala Convention
Article 5(6) of the 2009 Kampala Convention provides:
States Parties shall provide sufficient protection and assistance to internally displaced persons, and where available resources are inadequate to enable them to do so, they shall cooperate in seeking the assistance of international organizations and humanitarian agencies, civil society organizations and other relevant actors. Such organizations may offer their services to all those in need. 
African Union Convention for the Protection and Assistance of Internally Displaced Persons in Africa, adopted in Kampala, Uganda, 23 October 2009, Article 5(6).
In Article 5(3), the Convention provides:
States Parties shall respect the mandates of the African Union and the United Nations, as well as the roles of international humanitarian organizations in providing protection and assistance to internally displaced persons, in accordance with international law. 
African Union Convention for the Protection and Assistance of Internally Displaced Persons in Africa, adopted in Kampala, Uganda, 23 October 2009, Article 5(3).
Article 8(3) of the Convention imposes specific obligations on the African Union in this regard:
The African Union shall support the efforts of the States Parties to protect and assist internally displaced persons under this Convention. In particular, the Union shall:
a. Strengthen the institutional framework and capacity of the African Union with respect to protection and assistance to internally displaced persons;
b. Coordinate the mobilisation of resources for protection and assistance to internally displaced persons;
c. Collaborate with international organizations and humanitarian agencies, civil society organizations and other relevant actors in accordance with their mandates, to support measures taken by States Parties to protect and assist internally displaced persons.
d. Cooperate directly with African States and international organizations and humanitarian agencies, civil society organizations and other relevant actors, with respect to appropriate measures to be taken in relation to the protection of and assistance to internally displaced persons;
e. Share information with the African Commission on Human and Peoples’ Rights on the situation of displacement, and the protection and assistance accorded to internally displaced persons in Africa; and,
f. Cooperate with the Special Rapporteur of the African Commission on Human and Peoples’ Rights for Refugees, Returnees, IDPs and Asylum Seekers in addressing issues of internally displaced persons. 
African Union Convention for the Protection and Assistance of Internally Displaced Persons in Africa, adopted in Kampala, Uganda, 23 October 2009, Article 8(3).
Sarajevo Declaration on Humanitarian Treatment of Displaced Persons
The 1992 Sarajevo Declaration on Humanitarian Treatment of Displaced Persons expressed gratitude and firm support for the role of UNHCR in assisting and protecting the displaced and called for cooperation with UNHCR and other international humanitarian organizations. 
Sarajevo Declaration on Humanitarian Treatment of Displaced Persons, signed by the parties to the conflict in Bosnia and Herzegovina under the auspices of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, Sarajevo, 11 April 1992, annexed to Report of the UN Secretary-General pursuant to UN Security Council resolution 749, UN Doc. S/23836, 24 April 1992, Annex III, pp. 12–13.
Recommendation on the Tragic Situation of Civilians in Bosnia and Herzegovina
Paragraph 5 of the 1992 Recommendation on the Tragic Situation of Civilians in Bosnia and Herzegovina provided: “Persons temporarily transferred to areas other than their areas of origin should benefit, as vulnerable groups, from international assistance, inter alia, in conformity with its mandate, by the ICRC.” 
Recommendation on the Tragic Situation of Civilians in Bosnia and Herzegovina, adopted at the invitation of the International Committee of the Red Cross and signed by Representatives of Mr. Alija Izetbegović (President of the Republic of Bosnia and Herzegovina and President of the Party of Democratic Action), Representative of Mr. Radovan Karadžić (President of the Serbian Democratic Party), and Representative of Mr. Mate Boban (President of the Croatian Democratic Community), Geneva, 1 October 1992, § 5.
General Peace Agreement for Mozambique
In the 1992 General Peace Agreement for Mozambique, in order to organize necessary assistance for IDPs, the parties agreed “to seek the involvement of competent United Nations agencies … [as well as] the International Red Cross and other organisations”. 
General Peace Agreement for Mozambique, along with seven Protocols and four related documents, Rome, 4 October 1992, annexed to Letter dated 6 October 1992 from the permanent representative of Mozambique to the UN addressed to the President of the UN Security Council, UN Doc. S/24635, 8 October 1992.
Guiding Principles on Internal Displacement
Principle 25 of the 1998 Guiding Principles on Internal Displacement states:
1. The primary duty and responsibility for providing humanitarian assistance to internally displaced persons lies with national authorities.
2. International humanitarian organisations and other appropriate actors have the right to offer their services in support of the internally displaced … Consent thereto shall not be arbitrarily withheld, particularly when authorities concerned are unable or unwilling to provide the required humanitarian assistance.
3. All authorities concerned shall grant and facilitate the free passage of humanitarian assistance and grant persons engaged in the provision of such assistance rapid and unimpeded access to the internally displaced. 
Guiding Principles on Internal Displacement, presented to the UN Commission on Human Rights by the Special Representative of the UN Secretary-General on Internally Displaced Persons, UN Doc. E/CN.4/1998/53/Add.2, 11 February 1998, Principle 25.
Australia
Australia’s LOAC Manual (2006) states:
… [T]he party to the conflict in whose hands protected persons may be, shall be responsible for their treatment and for making available to such persons facilities to enable such persons to make contact with and application to international humanitarian organisations such as the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC). 
Australia, The Manual of the Law of Armed Conflict, Australian Defence Doctrine Publication 06.4, Australian Defence Headquarters, 11 May 2006, § 9.20.
The LOAC Manual (2006) replaces both the Defence Force Manual (1994) and the Commanders’ Guide (1994).
Colombia
According to Colombia’s Law on Internally Displaced Persons (1997), forcibly displaced persons have the right to ask for and receive international aid, the corollary of which is the right of the international community to provide humanitarian assistance. 
Colombia, Law on Internally Displaced Persons, 1997, Article 2(1).
Georgia
Georgia’s Law on Displaced Persons (1996), as amended to 2010, states: “Financial resources for IDP assistance … Additional financial sources [include] … financial assistance rendered by other governments and international organizations.” 
Georgia, Law on Displaced Persons, 1996, as amended to 2010, Article 10(2).
The Law defines an IDP as:
Internally displaced person – [an] IDP is a citizen of Georgia or a stateless person permanently residing in Georgia, who was forced to leave his place of permanent residency and seek asylum within the territory of Georgia due to a threat to his or his relatives’ life, health and freedom, as a result of an aggression by a foreign state, an internal conflict or massive violations of human rights. 
Georgia, Law on Displaced Persons, 1996, as amended to 2010, Article 1.
Georgia
Georgia’s Law on Displaced Persons (1996), as amended in 2011, states:
Article 10 – Financial resources for IDP [internally displaced person] assistance
1. Under this law, financial expenses [for] IDPs shall be borne by the State and local budgets.
2. Additional financial sources [include] … financial assistance rendered by other governments and international organizations. 
Georgia, Law on Displaced Persons, 1996, as amended in 2011, Article 10.
The Law defines an internally displaced person from the occupied territory as follows:
Internally displaced person from the occupied territory – IDP is a citizen of Georgia or stateless person permanently residing in Georgia, who was forced to leave his place of permanent residency and seek asylum within the territory of Georgia due to the threat to his life, health and freedom or life, health and freedom of his family members, as a result of aggression of a foreign state, internal conflict o[r] mass violation of human rights or [a]s a result of events determined by … paragraph 11 of article 2 of this Law. 
Georgia, Law on Displaced Persons, 1996, as amended in 2011, Article 1(1).
Georgia
Georgia’s Law on Internally Displaced Persons (2014) states:
Article 21. Sources of Financial Assistance for IDPs [internally displaced persons]
1. Expenses for IDPs envisaged by this Law shall be reimbursed from the state budget.
2. The additional sources of funding include … financial assistance provided by foreign governments and international organizations.” 
Georgia, Law on Internally Displaced Persons, 2014, Article 21.
Guinea
Guinea’s Children’s Code (2008) states: “Competent Guinean authorities shall help international organizations tasked with protecting and assisting refugees with their efforts to protect and assist Children.” 
Guinea, Children’s Code, 2008, Article 434.
Nepal
In 2007, in its National Policies on Internally Displaced Persons, Nepal stated:
1. Background
Due to natural disasters, human-made circumstances and disasters, armed conflict and situations of violence and fears having [been] created therefrom, persons and families are forcefully displaced from their homes or places of their habitual residence and thus they are time and again required to face such situations that force them to reside in other parts of the country. …
3. Definitions:
For the purpose of these Policies:
(a) “Internally Displaced Person” means a person who is living somewhere else in the country after having [been] forced to flee or leave their home or place of habitual residence due to armed conflict or situation of violence or gross violations of human rights or natural disasters or human-made disasters … or with an intention of avoiding the effects of such situations.
7. Strategies
In order to achieve the objectives of these policies, the following strategies will be adopted:
7.2 In order to perform the necessary functions in relation to internal displacement, an institutional mechanism of the government will be developed and integrated and coordinated efforts of local bodies, national and international non-governmental organisations, community organisations, donor agencies, various political parties including private sectors will be mobilized.
10. Policy Implementation, Monitoring and Evaluation
10.4 An appropriate environment will be created so that international humanitarian and other appropriate institutions could provide support to displaced persons. 
Nepal, National Policies on Internally Displaced Persons, 22 February 2007, §§ 1, 3, 7, 7.2, 10 and 10.4.
Peru
Peru’s Law on Internal Displacement (2004) states:
When the magnitude of the problem so demands, the State must call for the participation of international organizations, including United Nations agencies, in providing protection and assistance [to internally displaced persons] or [the State must call for] their cooperation through technical advice. 
Peru, Law on Internal Displacement, 2004, Article 4(2).
The Law further states:
All authorities concerned must grant and facilitate for international humanitarian organizations and other competent actors, in the exercise of their respective mandates, rapid and unimpeded access to internally displaced persons for them to assist in their return or resettlement and reintegration. 
Peru, Law on Internal Displacement, 2004, Article 16.
The Law also states:
Protection and humanitarian assistance are provided without any distinction based on race, colour, sex, language, religion or belief, opinion of a political or any other nature, national, ethnic or social origin, legal or social status, age, disability, economic status, birth or any other similar criterion.  
Peru, Law on Internal Displacement, 2004, Article 5.
The Law further states:
Humanitarian assistance is carried out in accordance with the principles of humanity and impartiality and without discrimination, for no more than six months from the moment the provision of humanitarian assistance begins. Special cases, if so required, shall be dealt with individually. 
Peru, Law on Internal Displacement, 2004, Article 10.
Peru
Peru’s Regulations to the Law on Internal Displacement (2005) states: “International humanitarian organizations and other competent actors may offer their services in support of internally displaced persons. The State may not withdraw humanitarian assistance within the timeframe stipulated in Article 10 of the Law.” 
Peru, Regulations to the Law on Internal Displacement, 2005, Article 17.
The Regulations also states: “All competent authorities shall grant and facilitate the free passage of humanitarian assistance and grant persons engaged in the provision of such assistance rapid and unimpeded access to the internally displaced.” 
Peru, Regulations to the Law on Internal Displacement, 2005, Article 18.
No data.
Afghanistan
In 2009, in its initial report to the Committee on the Rights of the Child, Afghanistan stated:
267. In 2002, a MOU [Memorandum of Understanding] was signed between the GoA [Government of Afghanistan], UNAMA [United Nations Assistance Mission in Afghanistan], and UNHCR giving UNHCR a lead support role in relation to IDPs [internally displaced persons]. In 2005, a National Policy was formed with emphasis on durable solutions and affirming the lead role of the Afghan Government represented by the MoRR [Ministry of Refugees and Repatriations], with the support of UNHCR. The policy aims at assisting IDPs in term of protection, meeting their basic daily needs, and in finding durable solutions for IDPs through voluntary return and/or local integration.
268. … The displacement is mainly due to “conflict, ethnic tensions or human rights violations, and natural disasters such as drought, or secondary displacement”.
269. In 2002, during the fall of the Taliban regime, 1.2 million people were displaced … In 2006 alone, UNAMA reported that around 80–90,000 people fled due to fighting in the Helmand, Kandahar and Uruzgan provinces in southern Afghanistan. Some 99,035 families (490,459 individuals) were assisted between 2002 and July 2008 based on the MOU signed by GoA, UNAMA and UNHCR.
271. Conflict-induced displacement remains a concern to National authorities, with a particular focus on the situation in the south and the west portions of the country, where UNHCR has been registering and assisting IDPs. 
Afghanistan, Initial report to the Committee on the Rights of the Child, 13 June 2010, UN Doc. CRC/C/AFG/1, submitted 28 August 2009, §§ 267–269 and 271.
[footnotes in original omitted]
Australia
In 2009, in a ministerial statement before the House of Representatives on the humanitarian crisis in Sri Lanka, Australia’s Minister for Foreign Affairs stated:
Australia … urges the Sri Lankan government to ensure as a matter of urgency that the process of evacuation from the conflict zone is open to monitoring by the International Committee of the Red Cross and United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees and other UN officials. Such access would underline the Sri Lankan government’s commitment to the protection of its civilians and build confidence in its management of this difficult situation. 
Australia, House of Representatives, Minister for Foreign Affairs, Ministerial statement: Humanitarian Crisis in Sri Lanka, Hansard, 12 May 2009, p. 3501.
Canada
In 2005, in response to a question relating, inter alia, to the provision of assistance to Palestinian refugees, Canada’s Minister of Foreign Affairs stated:
The United Nations Relief and Works Agency for Palestinian refugees, the UNRWA, was established prior to the refugee convention relating to the status of refugees. It was given specific authority to provide assistance to Palestinian refugees.
Reflecting this unique political situation of the Palestinian refugees, the international community, through the UN General Assembly, requires UNRWA to continue to provide humanitarian assistance pending a political situation. 
Canada, House of Commons Debates, Statement by the Minister of Foreign Affairs, 16 June 2005, Canadian Yearbook of International Law, 2005, volume XLIII, p. 587.
Canada
In 2012, in a statement on the strengthening of the coordination of humanitarian and disaster relief assistance of the United Nations, the permanent representative of Canada stated:
We recognize the immense pressure that the influx of refugees [from Syria] is placing on refugee host countries and communities. We commend the generosity of neighbouring states – Turkey, Jordan, Lebanon and Iraq – in welcoming refugees fleeing the violence in Syria. Their generosity is borne from a genuine spirit of humanitarianism. 
Canada, Statement by the permanent representative of Canada on the strengthening of the coordination of humanitarian and disaster relief assistance of the United Nations, 13 December 2012.
Canada
In 2013, Canada’s Office of the Prime Minister issued a press release entitled “PM announces further support to those affected by the ongoing conflict in Syria”, which stated:
Canada is providing $90 million in support to humanitarian organizations operating in Syria and in refugee-hosting countries with a view to urgently provide food, clean water and sanitation, emergency health care, shelter, and protection for populations affected by the Syrian crisis. 
Canada, Office of the Prime Minister, “PM announces further support to those affected by the ongoing conflict in Syria”, Press Release, 17 June 2013.
Canada
In 2013, Canada’s Department of Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development issued a press release entitled “Canada Outlines Humanitarian Assistance in Response to Syrian Crisis”, which stated:
Canada’s humanitarian assistance will address the urgent needs of up to 6.8 million conflict-affected people (including 3.1 million children) living in Syria, 4.25 million of whom are internally displaced. It will also help address the urgent needs of close to two million refugees from Syria in neighbouring countries and Nord Africa.
“Canada is helping to ensure that Syrian people affected by the crisis receive the life-saving emergency support they need,” said Minister Paradis. “Canada’s support will help to ensure that emergency health services, shelter, food, water and protection are provided to the most vulnerable people affected by the conflict both inside Syria and in neighbouring countries.” 
Canada, Department of Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development, “Canada Outlines Humanitarian Assistance in Response to Syrian Crisis”, Press Release, 28 August 2013.
Canada
In 2013, in a statement during the 68th Session of the UN General Assembly, the Minister of Foreign Affairs of Canada stated: “I commend the work of the UNHCR in providing assistance to the refugees fleeing this terrible conflict [in Syria], and the generosity of Syria’s neighbours in providing safe havens.” 
Canada, Address by the Minister of Foreign Affairs during the 68th Session of the UN General Assembly, 30 September 2013.
Canada
In 2013, Canada’s Department of Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development issued a press release entitled “Canada outlines humanitarian assistance in response to Syrian crisis”, which stated:
Canada’s humanitarian assistance will help address the urgent needs of more than eight million conflict-affected and displaced persons living in Syria and in the region, more than four million of whom are children.
Canada’s support will provide emergency shelter, food, nutrition, clean water and sanitation, education, and basic health services, including psycho-social and gender-based violence support.
“The Syrian people have been subject to appalling levels of violence and brutality and we continue to call on all parties to the conflict to provide unhindered humanitarian access and allow for the safe delivery of emergency relief to those in need,” added Minister Paradis. “Canada will continue working to meet the basic needs of conflict-affected Syrians living in the country, as well as Syrian refugees who have sought asylum in neighbouring countries.” 
Canada, Department of Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development, “Canada outlines humanitarian assistance in response to Syrian crisis”, Press Release, 10 October 2013.
II. Articles 1 [containing the definition of racial discrimination], 2 [on measures to be taken to ensure the elimination of racial discrimination in all its forms] and 3 [on the prevention, prohibition and eradication of apartheid] of the Convention
France
The Report on the Practice of France states that France considers humanitarian assistance to displaced persons to be a duty that goes beyond political structures and that humanitarian intervention is becoming an international duty, as long as it is non-discriminatory and focuses on the protection of life and health. 
Report on the Practice of France, 1999, Chapter 5.4.
Germany
In 2005, in its Seventh Human Rights Policy Report submitted to the Bundestag (Lower House of Parliament), Germany’s Federal Government stated:
With the 1998 guidelines on the handling of crises related to internally displaced persons (“Guiding Principles on Internal Displacement”) by the then Representative of the UN Secretary-General on the Human Rights of Internally Displaced Persons, Francis Deng, the international community has a practice-oriented document, which summarizes existing standards on the protection of internally displaced persons and gives further recommendations. Although these guiding principles are not a binding instrument under international law, their acceptance by States, international organizations and NGOs has continued to grow over the past years, so that now they are virtually regarded as customary international law. 
Germany, Federal Government, Seventh Human Rights Policy Report, 17 June 2005, pp. 97–98.
Guinea
In 2009, in its second periodic report to the Committee on the Rights of the Child, Guinea stated:
471. Guinea has been greatly affected by the civil wars in Liberia and Sierra Leone that have raged since 24 December 1989. Faithfully observing international human rights agreements, the [1989] Convention [on the Rights of the Child] and the [1990] African Charter on the Rights and Welfare of the Child, Guinea has generously opened its doors to more than half a million refugees, including more than 305,000 children and young persons under 18 years of age (or 61 per cent of the refugee population), traumatized and hounded by a war that threatens their survival. They have been given shelter throughout the national territory, but especially in Guinée Forestière.
483. These activities [care and support for refugees, including separated children] were carried out with contributions from the following partners: UNHCR, Médecins sans frontières (MSF) France and Belgium, German Agency for International Cooperation (GTZ), IRC, ABC Développement, Centre for International Studies and Cooperation of Canada, the American Refugee Committee (ARC) and others.
485. Opportunities:
- Presence of humanitarian organizations active in the field (UNHCR, ICRC, MSF, UNICEF, IRC, ARC, Terre des Hommes, Enfant réfugiés du monde, GTZ, etc.)
- Emergence and strengthening of specialized NGO activities (ICRC/International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies, IRC, ARC, Save the Children, Caritas Makeni, etc.)
- Establishment of a database (Child Connect programme) by IRC to facilitate cross-border family trac[ing] and communication between the different agencies working under the programme, which has attracted the attention of many partners such as UNICEF, Save the Children UK and UNHCR. 
Guinea, Second periodic report to the Committee on the Rights of the Child, 18 April 2012, UN Doc. CRC/C/GIN/2, submitted 24 December 2009, §§ 471, 483 and 485.
India
In 2009, in a statement during a debate in the Lower House of Parliament (Lok Sabha) on the situation in Sri Lanka, India’s Minister of External Affairs and Minister of Finance stated:
A serious source of concern to us has been the condition of the civilians and internally displaced persons (IDPs), mostly Tamil, caught up in the zone of conflict. Estimates on the number of civilians trapped vary, but 70,000 or so are estimated to be there now. …
Hon. Members may rest assured that our strong concerns for the safety, security and welfare of the civilians caught in the conflict have led us to stay actively engaged to prevent a further deterioration of humanitarian conditions. We have sent relief supplies to the civilians and the internally displaced persons (IDPs), facilitated access by international and UN organisations, and suggested ways for civilians and IDPs to escape from the conflict zone. Two batches of relief assistance have been sent so far including 80,000 family packs of food and non-food articles, collected and donated by the Government of Tamil Nadu, and medicines. Another batch of relief material is being sent. 
India, Statement by the Minister of External Affairs and Minister of Finance during a debate in the Lower House of Parliament (Lok Sabha) on the situation in Sri Lanka, 18 February 2009.
Philippines
In 1990, a number of government departments and NGOs in the Philippines signed a Memorandum of Agreement providing that an NGO medical team would be given access in order to ensure the delivery of health services to IDPs located in evacuation centres or in other areas where health resources were inadequate.  
Philippines, Memorandum of Agreement on the Delivery of Health Services between the Departments of Foreign Affairs, Justice, Local Government, National Defense and Health and the Philippines Alliance of Human Rights Advocates (PAHRA), the Free Legal Assistance Group (FLAG) and the Medical Action Group (MAG), 10 December 1990, § 1, Report on the Practice of the Philippines, 1997, Chapter 5.5.
Philippines
The Guidelines on Evacuations adopted by the Presidential Human Rights Committee of the Philippines in 1991 provide:
Non-Government health workers (e.g. doctors, nurses, dentists, trained community health workers and volunteer relief workers) shall be permitted to go to evacuation centres to render medical/relief assistance to evacuees. 
Philippines, Presidential Human Rights Committee, Res. No. 91-001 Providing for Guidelines on Evacuations, Manila, 26 March 1991, § 5.
South Africa
In 2010, in a statement at the Tenth Annual Regional Seminar on the Implementation of International Humanitarian Law in Pretoria, South Africa’s Deputy Minister of the Department of International Relations and Cooperation stated:
African leaders also recognised that IDPs [internally displaced persons] could be a possible contributing factor to instability on the continent. Faced with the reality that the African continent has one of the largest number of IDPs, estimated at about 11,8 million from 21 countries, Heads of State and Government of Member States of the AU [African Union] met during November 2009 to adopt the Convention for the Protection and Assistance of Internally Displaced Persons in Africa (the Kampala Convention), in an effort to address these challenges, the first continent to have done so. …
This Convention also recognizes that in order to contribute to a stable Africa, international organisations[,] in particular the ICRC, as well [as] the African Union (AU) and the United Nations (UN) must play an important role in addressing the challenges of IDPs . Partnerships based on mutual respect create favourable conditions for finding durable solutions to the problem of internal displacements. Accordingly, we appreciate the important contribution the ICRC has made to the AU in terms of capacity building and other projects, within the realm of IDPs, as well as to assist in the finalisation of the AU IDP Convention. 
South Africa, Statement by the Deputy Minister of the Department of International Relations and Cooperation at the Tenth Annual Regional Seminar on the Implementation of International Humanitarian Law in Pretoria, 4 May 2010, pp. 2–3.
Sudan
In 1996, during a debate in the UN Commission on Human Rights, the representative of the Sudan noted that:
his country was grappling with the problem of internally displaced persons and said that the authorities were making every effort to solve it, in particular by establishing specialized agencies and coordinating action by international humanitarian organizations.
As part of its search for solutions at the domestic level, the Government had concluded an agreement with two rebel movements in the southern part of the country, which would help to solve part of the problem …
Sudan would continue to cooperate with the International Committee of the Red Cross and voluntary organizations, including the regions to which displaced persons were returning. 
Sudan, Statement before the UN Commission on Human Rights, UN Doc. E/CN.4/1996/SR.40, 20 May 1996, §§ 43–46.
Switzerland
In 2009, in response to a motion before the Council of States by the Commission on Foreign Policy, Switzerland’s Federal Council stated:
The humanitarian situation in Sri Lanka is of the highest concern to the Federal Council. …
Humanitarian aid
The Federal Council considers that what is most urgent is to ensure respect for international humanitarian law by all parties to the conflict, the protection of the civilian population and the rapid access of humanitarian organizations, without restriction. For this reason, Switzerland is actively engaged on the ground in delivering essential goods to displaced persons in Vanni, in ensuring their security and in promoting the access, without restriction, of international aid organizations.
The humanitarian assistance provided by Switzerland to Sri Lanka reached 5.1 million Swiss francs in 2008. For the year 2009, a budget of 4.8 million Swiss francs is foreseen and additional resources were made available to finance the delivery of medicine as well as assistance to internally displaced persons that have already been evacuated. 
Switzerland, Council of States, Response by the Federal Council to Motion No. 09.3358, 13 May 2009, pp. 1–2.
Switzerland
In 2009, in response to a question by a member of the National Council, Switzerland’s Federal Council stated:
… The Federal Council expressly deplores that this decades-old conflict has … deprived tens of thousands of internally displaced [persons] of their means of subsistence.
Humanitarian aid
The Federal Council considers that what is most urgent is to ensure the protection of the civilian population, in particular of evacuated victims of war and internally displaced [persons]. This is why Switzerland is actively engaged on the ground in ensuring that international aid organizations have access, without restriction, to these persons, that these persons have adequate support through the supply of food, medication and emergency shelter, and that they can return as quickly as possible to their region of origin, in safety and dignity. 
Switzerland, National Council, Response by the Federal Council to Question No. 09.1059, 19 August 2009, pp. 1–2.
Switzerland
In 2009, in its Report on Foreign Policy, Switzerland’s Federal Council stated:
Due to its long presence in the region, Switzerland was able to react promptly and in an adapted manner to the armed conflict between Russia and Georgia concerning South Ossetia; it adjusted and intensified certain aspects of its engagement in the region ( … programmes to assist persons displaced by the conflict …). …
… In Colombia, the humanitarian assistance of the [Swiss] Confederation is for victims of violations of human rights linked to the long internal conflict and to persons displaced within the country.
Persons displaced because of armed conflicts … will continue to be the object of Switzerland’s specific attention whether on the legal, political or operational level. This consists of, through a constant exchange with and with the support of our main partners, promoting respect for the law and seeking durable solutions for the millions of persons forced into displacement. 
Switzerland, Federal Council, Report on Foreign Policy 2009, 2 September 2009, Sections 3.2.2.2.5, 3.2.3.2 and 3.3.7.2, pp. 5730, 5747 and 5808.
Switzerland
In 2010, in its Report on Foreign Policy, Switzerland’s Federal Council stated:
Despite the efforts of the international community, the number of persons having to leave their countries due to war, violence or natural catastrophes is increasing. …
Far from their homes, these persons more than ever need protection that many States are not able to ensure. One of the main missions of the international community consists of assisting these States to protect the groups of vulnerable persons, in conformity with their international commitments. This consists of, in particular, … providing the necessary assistance to victims, first of all among them to women and children. 
Switzerland, Federal Council, Report on Foreign Policy 2010, 10 December 2010, Section 4.2.1, p. 1084.
Tajikistan
In 2008, in its second periodic report to the Committee on the Rights of the Child, Tajikistan stated: “Over the last 10 years, the conflict in Afghanistan has driven about a thousand Afghans to seek refuge in Tajikistan.” 
Tajikistan, Second periodic report to the Committee on the Rights of the Child, 2 April 2009, UN Doc. CRC/C/TJK/2, submitted 21 February 2008, § 8.
In the report, Tajikistan also stated:
540. The refugee children come from the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan. …
542. It is mainly the UNHCR that provides protection and humanitarian assistance for refugee children and refugees in general, through its partners in the field, namely, the Norwegian Refugee Council, the NGO Refugee Children and Vulnerable Citizens (RСVС), the Legal Aid Centre of the NGO Society and Law[,] and other organizations, such as the International Committee of the Red Cross and the Red Crescent Society of Tajikistan.
543. The UNHCR and the RСVС provide material, humanitarian and medical assistance for 2,350 refugees and child refugees (the latter account for half the total) and refunds 50 per cent of what they spend on medicines. These refugees can consult doctors free of charge and obtain hospital treatment. Persons with disabilities of various kinds and vulnerable groups with children receive a monthly allowance. The poorest groups have their rent paid. 
Tajikistan, Second periodic report to the Committee on the Rights of the Child, 2 April 2009, UN Doc. CRC/C/TJK/2, submitted 21 February 2008, §§ 540 and 542–543.
Thailand
In 2011, in its combined third and fourth periodic reports to the Committee on the Rights of the Child, Thailand stated:
Children in temporary shelters for displaced persons fleeing armed conflict
101. The aim of Thailand’s policy towards displaced persons fleeing armed conflict is to provide assistance on a humanitarian basis pending eventual repatriation. While taking refuge in the temporary shelters, displaced persons are forbidden to go out of the designated areas or take any actions that might jeopardize the relationships with Thailand’s neighbors. The management of the camps follows strict guidelines and takes into account the observations and concerns of the CRC Committee [Committee on the Rights of the Child].
102. Some of the measures taken to ensure proper care and treatment of these people are:
(f) Cooperation with 17 private organizations and international organizations in providing care and welfare services to displace[d] persons[.] 
Thailand, Combined third and fourth periodic reports to the Committee on the Rights of the Child, 14 September 2011, UN Doc. CRC/C/THA/3-4, submitted 11 July 2011, §§ 101 and 102(f).
United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland
In 1994, during a debate in the UN Security Council on Rwanda, the United Kingdom welcomed the efforts being made by various UN agencies and NGOs to alleviate the suffering of IDPs. It noted that the UK Government had made a “substantial commitment” to the work of these organizations. 
United Kingdom, Statement before the UN Security Council, UN Doc. S/PV.3388, 8 June 1994, p. 8.
United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland
In 2003, in reply to a question in the House of Commons on “people internally displaced as a result of the conflict in Iraq”, the UK Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Foreign and Commonwealth Office, stated:
We have talked to the various NGOs that may have to deal with some of the IDPs [internally displaced persons], and to the countries that may be affected as people try to move towards their borders. We have been seeking agreements with other countries about how they will respond to the refugees coming towards their borders. We have also been talking to the military, who will obviously come across IDPs very quickly. We have discussed how they will ensure that those people’s safety is guaranteed and how they will ensure that IDPs get the humanitarian aid that they need as quickly as possible. 
United Kingdom, House of Commons, Statement by the Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Foreign and Commonwealth Office, Hansard, 19 March 2003, Vol. 401, Debates, col. 946.
United States of America
In 1991, during a debate in the UN Security Council, the United States expressed profound concern about the plight of displaced persons and noted that the United States had contributed generously to the care and maintenance of the displaced in Iraq. 
United States, Statement before the UN Security Council, UN Doc. S/PV.2982, 5 April 1991, pp. 58–60.
Yugoslavia, Federal Republic of
In a Joint Communiqué issued in 1992, the President and the Prime Minister of the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia expressed strong support for “the efforts of all agencies, local and international, to relieve the plight of displaced persons in all territories of the former Yugoslavia”. 
Yugoslavia, Federal Republic of, Joint Communiqué by the President and the Prime Minister, Belgrade, 11 September 1992, annexed to Report of the UN Secretary-General on the International Conference on the Former Yugoslavia, UN Doc. S/24795, 11 November 1992, p. 35, § 3(e).
UN Security Council
In a resolution adopted in 1991 on repression of the Iraqi civilian population, including Kurds in Iraq, the UN Security Council asked the Secretary-General “to use all the resources at his disposal, including those of the relevant United Nations agencies, to address urgently the critical needs of the refugees and displaced Iraqi population”. 
UN Security Council, Res. 688, 5 April 1991, § 5, voting record: 10-3-2.
UN Security Council
In a resolution adopted in 1995 on Tajikistan, the UN Security Council noted the request “addressed to international organizations and States to provide substantial financial and material support to the refugees and internally displaced persons”. 
UN Security Council, Res. 999, 16 June 1995, § 14, voting record: 15-0-0.
UN Security Council
In three resolutions adopted in 1995 in the context of the conflict in the former Yugoslavia, the UN Security Council reiterated its demand that immediate and unimpeded access to displaced people be given to representatives of UNHCR, the ICRC and other international agencies. 
UN Security Council, Res. 1010, 10 August 1995, preamble and § 1 voting record: 15-0-0; Res. 1019, 9 November 1995, preamble and § 2, voting record: 15-0-0; Res. 1034, 21 December 1995, preamble and §§ 4–5, voting record: 15-0-0.
UN Security Council
In a resolution adopted in 1996 on the Great Lakes region, the UN Security Council:
Requests the Secretary-General, in consultation with … the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, with the OAU, with the Special Envoy of the European Union …
(a) to draw up a concept of operations … with the objectives of:
–Delivering short-term humanitarian assistance and shelter to refugees and displaced persons in eastern Zaire;
–Assisting the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees with the protection … of refugees and displaced persons;
–Establishing humanitarian corridors for the delivery of humanitarian assistance. 
UN Security Council, Res. 1078, 9 November 1996, § 10, voting record: 15-0-0.
UN Security Council
In a resolution adopted in 1997 on eastern Zaire, the UN Security Council endorsed a plan for the “facilitation of access to humanitarian assistance” for all refugees and displaced persons. 
UN Security Council, Res. 1097, 18 February 1997, § 1, voting record: 15-0-0.
UN Security Council
In a resolution adopted in 1997 on Croatia, the UN Security Council welcomed “the renewed mandate of the Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe, in particular [its] focus on … return of all refugees and displaced persons [and] protection of their rights”. 
UN Security Council, Res. 1120, 14 July 1997, § 17, voting record: 15-0-0.
UN Security Council
In a resolution adopted in 2006 on the protection of civilians in armed conflict, the UN Security Council urged “the international community to provide support and assistance to enable States to fulfil their responsibilities regarding the protection of refugees and other persons protected under international humanitarian law”. 
UN Security Council, Res. 1674, 28 April 2006, § 13, voting record: 15-0-0.
UN Security Council
In a resolution adopted in 2006 on the Sudan, the UN Security Council:
Expresses its deep concern for the security of humanitarian aid workers and their access to populations in need, including refugees, internally displaced persons and other war-affected populations, and calls upon all parties, in particular the Government of National Unity, to ensure, in accordance with relevant provisions of international law, the full, safe and unhindered access of relief personnel to all those in need in Darfur as well as the delivery of humanitarian assistance, in particular to internally displaced persons and refugees. 
UN Security Council, Res. 1706, 31 August 2006, preamble, voting record: 12-0-3.
UN Security Council
In 1995, in a statement by its President on Croatia, the UN Security Council called on all the parties “to cooperate fully with UNCRO, UNHCR and the ICRC in protecting and assisting the local civilians and any displaced persons”. 
UN Security Council, Statement by the President, UN Doc. S/PRST/1995/26, 4 May 1995.
UN Security Council
In 1997, in a statement by its President on the Great Lakes region/Zaire, the UN Security Council called upon all parties “to allow access by United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees and humanitarian agencies to refugees and displaced persons”. 
UN Security Council, Statement by the President, UN Doc. S/PRST/1997/11, 7 March 1997, p. 1.
In further statements by its President the same year, the UN Security Council called upon the Alliance of Democratic Forces for the Liberation of Congo/Zaire (ADFL) to ensure safe and unrestricted access by humanitarian relief agencies so as to guarantee humanitarian aid and the safety of displaced persons in the areas under its control. 
UN Security Council, Statement by the President, UN Doc. S/PRST/1997/19, 4 April 1997, p. 1; Statement by the President, UN Doc. S/PRST/1997/22, 24 April 1997, p. 1.
UN Security Council
In 1997, in a statement by its President on Georgia, the UN Security Council welcomed “the continued efforts by United Nations agencies and humanitarian organizations to address the urgent needs of … internally displaced persons” and encouraged “further contributions to that end”. 
UN Security Council, Statement by the President, UN Doc. S/PRST/1997/25, 8 May 1997, p. 2.
UN Security Council
In 1997, in a statement by its President on the Democratic Republic of the Congo, the UN Security Council called for access for humanitarian assistance to be facilitated and for the rights of refugees and displaced persons to be fully respected. 
UN Security Council, Statement by the President, UN Doc. S/PRST/1997/31, 29 May 1997, p. 2.
UN Security Council
In 2007, in a statement by its President on the situation in Somalia, the UN Security Council emphasized “the need for strengthened efforts to provide humanitarian relief assistance to Somalia, including assistance to the hundreds of thousands of displaced persons, and urges Member States to support generously such operations”.  
UN Security Council, Statement by the President, UN Doc. S/PRST/2007/13, 30 April 2007, p. 1.
UN General Assembly
In a resolution adopted in 1950, the UN General Assembly adopted the Statute of the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, which provides that the High Commissioner shall promote the execution of any measures calculated to improve the situation of refugees. 
UN General Assembly, Res. 428 (V), 14 December 1950, § 8(b), voting record: 36-5-11-8.
UN General Assembly
In a resolution adopted in 1998 on the situation of human rights in Kosovo, the UN General Assembly:
Requests the Secretary-General to pursue his humanitarian efforts in the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia (Serbia and Montenegro), working through the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, the World Food Programme, the United Nations Children’s Fund, other appropriate humanitarian organizations and the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights, with a view to assist in the voluntary return of the displaced persons to their homes in conditions of safety and dignity. 
UN General Assembly, Res. 53/164, 9 December 1998, § 26, voting record: 122-3-34-26.
UN General Assembly
In a resolution adopted in 2003 on Afghanistan, the UN General Assembly:
Expresses gratitude to those countries that continue to host Afghan refugee populations, and at the same time once again calls upon all groups to continue to fulfil their obligations for the protection of refugees and internally displaced persons and to allow international access for their protection and care. 
UN General Assembly, Res. 58/27 B, 5 December 2003, preamble, adopted without a vote.
UN General Assembly
In a resolution adopted in 2003 on the strengthening of the coordination of emergency humanitarian assistance of the United Nations, the UN General Assembly:
Encourages Member States with internally displaced persons to develop or strengthen, as appropriate, national laws, policies and minimum standards on internal displacement, inter alia, taking into account the Guiding Principles on Internal Displacement, and to continue to work with humanitarian agencies in endeavours to provide a more predictable response to the needs of internally displaced persons, and in this regard calls for international support, upon request, to capacity-building efforts of Governments. 
UN General Assembly, Res. 58/114, 17 December 2003, § 11, adopted without a vote.
UN General Assembly
In a resolution adopted in 2003 on assistance for humanitarian relief, rehabilitation and development for Timor-Leste, the UN General Assembly:
Welcomes the efforts of the Government of Indonesia and relevant intergovernmental and non-governmental organizations in providing humanitarian assistance to the refugees of Timor-Leste in the Indonesian province of East Nusa Tenggara, in facilitating their return to and reintegration in Timor-Leste or in assisting with their local integration and resettlement, as appropriate, in Indonesia. 
UN General Assembly, Res. 58/121, 17 December 2003, preamble, adopted without a vote.
UN General Assembly
In a resolution adopted in 2003 on assistance to refugees, returnees and displaced persons in Africa, the UN General Assembly:
Convinced of the need to strengthen the capacity of States to provide assistance to and protection for refugees, returnees and displaced persons and of the need for the international community, within the context of burden-sharing, to increase its material, financial and technical assistance to the countries affected by refugees, returnees and displaced persons, to simultaneously address the inadequacies of existing assistance arrangements and to support initiatives in this regard,
10. … calls upon African States, the international community and relevant United Nations organizations to take concrete action to meet the needs of refugees, returnees and displaced persons for protection and assistance and to contribute generously to national projects and programmes aimed at alleviating their plight;
35. Expresses grave concern about the plight of internally displaced persons in Africa, … and urges the international community, led by relevant United Nations organizations, to contribute generously to national projects and programmes aimed at alleviating the plight of internally displaced persons. 
UN General Assembly, Res. 58/149, 22 December 2003, preamble and §§ 10 and 35, adopted without a vote.
UN General Assembly
In a resolution adopted in 2003 on assistance to unaccompanied refugee minors, the UN General Assembly:
10. Calls upon the Secretary-General, the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, the Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs of the Secretariat, the United Nations Children’s Fund, other United Nations organizations and other international organizations to mobilize adequate assistance to unaccompanied refugee minors in the areas of relief, education, recreational activities, health and psychological rehabilitation;
11. Encourages the Special Representative of the Secretary-General for Children and Armed Conflict in his efforts to raise awareness worldwide and mobilize official and public opinion for the protection of children affected by armed conflict, including refugee minors. 
UN General Assembly, Res. 58/150, 22 December 2003, preamble and §§ 10–11, adopted without a vote.
UN General Assembly
In a resolution adopted in 2003 on the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, the UN General Assembly:
5. Re-emphasizes that the protection of refugees is primarily the responsibility of States, whose full and effective cooperation, action and political resolve are required to enable the Office of the High Commissioner to fulfil its mandated functions;
6. Emphasizes that international protection is a dynamic and action-oriented function that is at the core of the mandate of the Office of the High Commissioner and which includes, in cooperation with States and other partners, the promotion and facilitation of, inter alia, the admission, reception and treatment of refugees and the ensuring of durable, protection-oriented solutions, bearing in mind the particular needs of vulnerable groups …
8. Recalls the important role of effective partnerships and coordination in meeting the needs of refugees and other displaced persons and in finding durable solutions to their situations, and welcomes the efforts under way, in cooperation with other United Nations agencies and development actors, to promote a framework for durable solutions, particularly in protracted refugee situations, including the “4Rs” approach (repatriation, reintegration, rehabilitation and reconstruction) to sustainable return;
9. Urges all States and relevant non-governmental and other organizations, in conjunction with the Office of the High Commissioner, in a spirit of international solidarity and burden- and responsibility-sharing, to cooperate and to mobilize resources with a view to enhancing the capacity of, and reducing the heavy burden borne by, countries that have received large numbers of refugees and asylum-seekers, and calls upon the Office to continue to play its catalytic role in mobilizing assistance from the international community to address the root causes as well as the economic, environmental and social impact of large-scale refugee populations in developing countries, particularly least developed countries, and countries with economies in transition;
10. Strongly reaffirms the fundamental importance and the purely humanitarian and non-political character of the function of the Office of the High Commissioner of providing international protection to refugees and seeking permanent solutions to refugee problems, and recalls that these solutions include voluntary repatriation and, where appropriate and feasible, local integration and resettlement in a third country, while reaffirming that voluntary repatriation, supported by necessary rehabilitation and development assistance to facilitate sustainable reintegration, remains the preferred solution. 
UN General Assembly, Res. 58/151, 22 December 2003, §§ 5–6 and 8–10, adopted without a vote.
UN General Assembly
In a resolution adopted in 2003 on human rights and mass exoduses, the UN General Assembly acknowledged with appreciation “the important and independent work of the International Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement and other humanitarian agencies in protecting and assisting refugees and internally displaced persons, in cooperation with relevant international bodies”. 
UN General Assembly, Res. 58/169, 22 December 2003, preamble, adopted without a vote.
UN General Assembly
In a resolution adopted in 2003 on the protection of and assistance to internally displaced persons, the UN General Assembly:
Acknowledging with appreciation the important and independent contribution of the International Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement and other humanitarian agencies in protecting and assisting internally displaced persons, in cooperation with relevant international bodies,
17. Welcomes the initiatives undertaken by regional organizations, such as the African Union, the Organization of American States, the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe, the Intergovernmental Authority on Development, the Council of Europe, the Commonwealth and the Economic Community of West African States, to address the protection, assistance and development needs of internally displaced persons, and encourages them and other regional organizations to strengthen their activities and their cooperation with the Representative of the Secretary-General. 
UN General Assembly, Res. 58/177, 22 December 2003, preamble and § 17, adopted without a vote.
UN General Assembly
In a resolution adopted in 2004 on emergency international assistance for peace, normalcy and reconstruction of war-stricken Afghanistan, the UN General Assembly:
Expresses its appreciation to those Governments that continue to host Afghan refugees, acknowledging the huge burden they have so far shouldered in this regard, and reminds them of their obligations under international refugee law with respect to the protection of refugees and the right to seek asylum and to allow international access for their protection and care. 
UN General Assembly, Res. 59/112 B, 8 December 2004, § 13, adopted without a vote.
UN General Assembly
In a resolution adopted in 2004 on the strengthening of the coordination of emergency humanitarian assistance of the United Nations, the UN General Assembly:
Encourages Member States with internally displaced persons to develop or strengthen, as appropriate, national laws, policies and minimum standards on internal displacement, inter alia, taking into account the Guiding Principles on Internal Displacement, and to continue to work with humanitarian agencies in endeavours to provide a more predictable response to the needs of internally displaced persons, and in this regard calls for international support, upon request, to the capacity-building efforts of Governments.  
UN General Assembly, Res. 59/141, 15 December 2004, § 16, adopted without a vote.
UN General Assembly
In a resolution adopted in 2004 on the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, the UN General Assembly:
6. Re-emphasizes that the protection of refugees is primarily the responsibility of States, whose full and effective cooperation, action and political resolve are required to enable the Office of the High Commissioner to fulfil its mandated functions;
7. Urges all States and relevant non-governmental and other organizations, in conjunction with the Office of the High Commissioner and in a spirit of international solidarity and burden- and responsibility-sharing, to cooperate and to mobilize resources with a view to enhancing the capacity of, and reducing the heavy burden borne by, countries that have received large numbers of refugees and asylum-seekers, including by holding international consultations aimed at developing a comprehensive plan of action, as appropriate, to respond to a specific mass influx or protracted refugee situation, and calls upon the Office to continue to play its catalytic role in mobilizing assistance from the international community to address the root causes as well as the economic, environmental and social impact of large-scale refugee populations in developing countries, in particular the least developed countries, and countries with economies in transition;
8. Emphasizes that international protection is a dynamic and action-oriented function that is at the core of the mandate of the Office of the High Commissioner and that includes, in cooperation with States and other partners, the promotion and facilitation of, inter alia, the admission, reception and treatment of refugees and the ensuring of durable, protection-oriented solutions, bearing in mind the particular needs of vulnerable groups …;
10. Recalls the important role of effective partnerships and coordination in meeting the needs of refugees and other displaced persons and in finding durable solutions to their situations, welcomes the efforts under way, in cooperation with refugee-hosting countries and countries of origin, including their respective local communities, United Nations agencies and other development actors, to promote a framework for durable solutions, particularly in protracted refugee situations, including the “4Rs” approach (repatriation, reintegration, rehabilitation and reconstruction) to sustainable return …;
11. Strongly reaffirms the fundamental importance and the purely humanitarian and non-political character of the function of the Office of the High Commissioner of providing international protection to refugees and seeking permanent solutions to refugee problems, and recalls that these solutions include voluntary repatriation and, where appropriate and feasible, local integration and resettlement in a third country, while reaffirming that voluntary repatriation, supported by necessary rehabilitation and development assistance to facilitate sustainable reintegration, remains the preferred solution. 
UN General Assembly, Res. 59/170, 20 December 2004, §§ 6–8 and 10–11, adopted without a vote.
UN General Assembly
In a resolution adopted in 2004 on humanitarian and special economic assistance to Serbia and Montenegro, the UN General Assembly:
1. Calls upon all States, regional organizations, intergovernmental and nongovernmental organizations and other relevant bodies to continue to provide assistance to alleviate the needs of refugees and internally displaced persons, bearing in mind in particular the special situation of women, children, the elderly and other vulnerable groups, and to assist financially and otherwise in seeking durable solutions for a safe return of refugees and internally displaced persons to their places of origin, or for settlement at their place of refuge for those who want to integrate locally, in cooperation with the local authorities, with a successive transition to development projects aimed at durable solutions to those questions;
5. Welcomes the continued commitment of Serbia and Montenegro and encourages it to cooperate further with the United Nations system as well as development and humanitarian organizations to address the needs of the affected population, including refugees and internally displaced persons, and urges the relevant authorities and the international community to support and stimulate development assistance for the implementation of the National Strategy for Resolving Problems of Refugees and Internally Displaced Persons, national strategies for poverty reduction and other programmes that will ensure that the needs of the vulnerable refugees and internally displaced persons in Serbia and Montenegro are met and to pursue durable solutions to their plight, in particular voluntary repatriation and reintegration, stresses the need to create conditions that are conducive to their safe return, and emphasizes in this regard the importance of regional cooperation in the search for solutions to the plight of refugees;
6. Urges the relevant government authorities in Serbia and Montenegro to develop, with the assistance of the United Nations system, national policies for comprehensive durable solutions for internally displaced persons based on the Guiding Principles on Internal Displacement, and in that regard invites the United Nations Interim Administration Mission in Kosovo to strengthen its efforts, within its mandate, in coordination with relevant government authorities in Serbia and Montenegro, for the establishment of the necessary conditions for the safe and sustainable return of internally displaced persons. 
UN General Assembly, Res. 59/215, 22 December 2004, §§ 1 and 5–6, adopted without a vote.
UN General Assembly
In a resolution adopted in 2004 on international assistance for the economic rehabilitation of Angola, the UN General Assembly:
Recognizing the urgent need to address as well as to increase national efforts and international support for the resettlement and reintegration of internally displaced persons as well as for the return of refugees and vulnerable groups and for their care in all parts of Angola,
5. Recognizes the primary responsibility of the Government of Angola for the welfare of all its citizens, including returning refugees and internally displaced persons, and calls upon Member States, in particular the donor community, including through South-South Cooperation and triangular cooperation, to continue to support the remaining humanitarian needs in Angola and to assist with the return and resettlement of refugees and internally displaced persons. 
UN General Assembly, Res. 59/216, 22 December 2004, preamble and § 5, adopted without a vote.
UN General Assembly
In a resolution adopted in 2004 on assistance for the rehabilitation and reconstruction of Liberia, the UN General Assembly:
7. Urges the National Transitional Government and all States to facilitate and support the return and reintegration of ex-combatants into their home communities, with special attention to children;
8. Commends the Secretary-General for his continuing efforts to mobilize international assistance for the development and reconstruction of Liberia, and requests him to continue his efforts to mobilize all possible assistance within the United Nations system to help in the reconstruction and development of Liberia and in the return and reintegration of refugees, displaced persons and demobilized soldiers. 
UN General Assembly, Res. 59/219, 22 December 2004, §§ 7–8, adopted without a vote.
UN General Assembly
In a resolution adopted in 2005 on emergency international assistance for peace, normalcy and reconstruction of war-stricken Afghanistan, the UN General Assembly:
17. Expresses its appreciation to those Governments that continue to host Afghan refugees, acknowledging the huge burden they have so far shouldered in this regard, and reminds them of their obligations under international refugee law with respect to the protection of refugees, the principle of voluntary return and the right to seek asylum and to allow international access for their protection and care;
18. Urges the Government of Afghanistan, acting with the support of the international community, to continue and strengthen its efforts to create the conditions for the voluntary, safe, dignified and sustainable return and reintegration of the remaining Afghan refugees and internally displaced persons;
19. Calls for the provision of continued international assistance to the large numbers of Afghan refugees and internally displaced persons to facilitate their voluntary, safe and orderly return. 
UN General Assembly, Res. 60/32B, 30 November 2005, §§ 17–19, adopted without a vote.
UN General Assembly
In a resolution adopted in 2005 on persons displaced as a result of the June 1967 and subsequent hostilities, the UN General Assembly:
3. Endorses … the efforts of the Commissioner-General of the United Nations Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees in the Near East to continue to provide humanitarian assistance, as far as practicable, on an emergency basis, and as a temporary measure, to persons in the area who are currently displaced and in serious need of continued assistance as a result of the June 1967 and subsequent hostilities;
4. Strongly appeals to all Governments and to organizations and individuals to contribute generously to the Agency and to the other intergovernmental and nongovernmental organizations concerned for the above-mentioned purposes. 
UN General Assembly, Res. 60/101, 8 December 2005, §§ 3–4, voting record: 161-6-5-19.
UN General Assembly
In a resolution adopted in 2005 on the strengthening of the coordination of emergency humanitarian assistance of the United Nations, the UN General Assembly:
Recognizes the Guiding Principles on Internal Displacement as an important international framework for the protection of internally displaced persons, and encourages Member States and humanitarian agencies to work together in endeavours to provide a more predictable response to the needs of internally. 
UN General Assembly, Res. 60/124, 15 December 2005, § 6, adopted without a vote.
UN General Assembly
In a resolution adopted in 2005 on assistance to refugees, returnees and displaced persons in Africa, the UN General Assembly:
9. Recalls the conclusion on registration of refugees and asylum-seekers adopted by the Executive Committee of the Programme of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees at its fifty-second session, notes the many forms of harassment faced by refugees and asylum-seekers who remain without any form of documentation attesting to their status, recalls the responsibility of States to register refugees on their territories, reiterates in this context the central role which early and effective registration and documentation can play, guided by protection considerations, in enhancing protection and supporting efforts to find durable solutions, and calls upon the Office of the High Commissioner, as appropriate, to help States to conduct this procedure should they be unable to register refugees on their territory;
10. Calls upon the international community, including States and the Office of the High Commissioner and other relevant United Nations organizations, within their respective mandates, to take concrete action to meet the protection and assistance needs of refugees, returnees and displaced persons and to contribute generously to projects and programmes aimed at alleviating their plight and facilitating durable solutions for refugees and displaced persons. 
UN General Assembly, Res. 60/128, 16 December 2005, §§ 9–10, adopted without a vote.
UN General Assembly
In a resolution adopted in 2005 on the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, the UN General Assembly:
7. Re-emphasizes that the protection of refugees is primarily the responsibility of States, whose full and effective cooperation, action and political resolve are required to enable the Office of the High Commissioner to fulfil its mandated functions;
8. Urges all States and relevant non-governmental and other organizations, in conjunction with the Office of the High Commissioner, in a spirit of international solidarity and burden- and responsibility-sharing, to cooperate and to mobilize resources with a view to enhancing the capacity of, and reducing the heavy burden borne by, countries that have received large numbers of refugees and asylum-seekers, and calls upon the Office to continue to play its catalytic role in mobilizing assistance from the international community to address the root causes as well as the economic, environmental and social impact of large-scale refugee populations in developing countries, in particular the least developed countries, and countries with economies in transition;
9. Emphasizes that international protection of refugees is a dynamic and action-oriented function that is at the core of the mandate of the Office of the High Commissioner and that it includes, in cooperation with States and other partners, the promotion and facilitation of, inter alia, the admission, reception and treatment of refugees in accordance with internationally agreed standards and the ensuring of durable, protection-oriented solutions, bearing in mind the particular needs of vulnerable;
12. Recalls the important role of effective partnerships and coordination in meeting the needs of refugees and other displaced persons and in finding durable solutions to their situations, welcomes the efforts under way, in cooperation with countries hosting refugees and countries of origin, including their respective local communities, United Nations agencies and other development actors, to promote a framework for durable solutions, particularly in protracted refugee situations, which includes the “4Rs” approach (repatriation, reintegration, rehabilitation and reconstruction) to sustainable return …
13. Strongly reaffirms the fundamental importance and the purely humanitarian and non-political character of the function of the Office of the High Commissioner of providing international protection to refugees and seeking permanent solutions to refugee problems, and recalls that these solutions include voluntary repatriation and, where appropriate and feasible, local integration and resettlement in a third country, while reaffirming that voluntary repatriation, supported by necessary rehabilitation and development assistance to facilitate sustainable reintegration, remains the preferred solution. 
UN General Assembly, Res. 60/129, 16 December 2005, §§ 7–9 and 12–13, adopted without a vote.
UN General Assembly
In a resolution adopted in 2005 on the universal realization of the right of peoples to self-determination, the UN General Assembly:
Expressing grave concern that … millions of people have been and are being uprooted from their homes as refugees and displaced persons, and emphasizing the urgent need for concerted international action to alleviate their condition. 
UN General Assembly, Res. 60/145, 16 December 2005, preamble, adopted without a vote.
UN General Assembly
In a resolution adopted in 2005 on the protection of and assistance to internally displaced persons, the UN General Assembly:
Acknowledging with appreciation the important and independent contribution of the International Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement and other humanitarian agencies in protecting and assisting internally displaced persons, in cooperation with relevant international bodies,
18. Welcomes the initiatives undertaken by regional organizations, such as the African Union, the Organization of American States, the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe, the Intergovernmental Authority on Development, the Council of Europe, the Commonwealth and the Economic Community of West African States, to address the protection, assistance and development needs of internally displaced persons, and encourages them and other regional organizations to strengthen their activities and their cooperation with the Representative of the Secretary-General. 
UN General Assembly, Res. 60/168, 16 December 2005, preamble and § 18, adopted without a vote.
UN General Assembly
In a resolution adopted in 2006 on the situation in Afghanistan, the UN General Assembly:
31. Expresses its appreciation to those Governments that continue to host Afghan refugees, acknowledging the huge burden they have so far shouldered in this regard, and reminds them of their obligations under international refugee law with respect to the protection of refugees, the principle of voluntary return and the right to seek asylum and to allow international access for their protection and care;
32. Urges the Government of Afghanistan, acting with the support of the international community, to continue and strengthen its efforts to create the conditions for the voluntary, safe, dignified and sustainable return and reintegration of the remaining Afghan refugees and internally displaced persons;
33. Calls for the provision of continued international assistance to the large numbers of Afghan refugees and internally displaced persons to facilitate their voluntary, safe and orderly return and sustainable reintegration into society so as to contribute to the stability of the entire country. 
UN General Assembly, Res. 61/18, 28 November 2006, §§ 31–33, adopted without a vote.
UN General Assembly
In a resolution adopted in 2006 on persons displaced as a result of the June 1967 and subsequent hostilities, the UN General Assembly:
3. Endorses, in the meanwhile, the efforts of the Commissioner-General of the United Nations Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees in the Near East to continue to provide humanitarian assistance, as far as practicable, on an emergency basis, and as a temporary measure, to persons in the area who are currently displaced and in serious need of continued assistance as a result of the June 1967 and subsequent hostilities;
4. Strongly appeals to all Governments and to organizations and individuals to contribute generously to the Agency and to the other intergovernmental and non-governmental organizations concerned for the above-mentioned purposes. 
UN General Assembly, Res. 61/113, 14 December 2006, §§ 3–4, voting record: 170-6-8-8.
UN General Assembly
In a resolution adopted in 2006 on operations of the United Nations Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees in the Near East, the UN General Assembly:
1. Expresses its appreciation to the Commissioner-General of the United Nations Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees in the Near East, as well as to all of the staff of the Agency, for their tireless efforts and valuable work, particularly in the light of the difficult conditions during the past year;
6. Endorses, meanwhile, the efforts of the Commissioner-General to continue to provide humanitarian assistance, as far as practicable, on an emergency basis, and as a temporary measure, to persons in the area who are internally displaced and in serious need of continued assistance as a result of recent incursions in the Occupied Palestinian Territory and hostilities in Lebanon;
7. Acknowledges the important support provided by the host Governments to the Agency in the discharge of its duties. 
UN General Assembly, Res. 61/114, 14 December 2006, §§ 1 and 6–7, voting record: 169-6-8-9.
UN General Assembly
In a resolution adopted in 2006 on the strengthening of the coordination of emergency humanitarian assistance of the United Nations, the UN General Assembly:
Recognizes the Guiding Principles on Internal Displacement as an important international framework for the protection of internally displaced persons, and encourages Member States and humanitarian agencies to continue to work together in endeavours to provide a more predictable response to the needs of internally displaced persons, and in this regard calls for international support, upon request, to capacity-building efforts of States. 
UN General Assembly, Res. 61/134, 14 December 2006, § 23, adopted without a vote.
UN General Assembly
In a resolution adopted in 2006 on the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, the UN General Assembly:
6. Re-emphasizes that the protection of refugees is primarily the responsibility of States, whose full and effective cooperation, action and resolve are required to enable the Office of the High Commissioner to fulfil its mandated functions, and strongly emphasizes, in this context, the importance of active international solidarity and burden- and responsibility-sharing;
8. Also emphasizes that protection of and assistance to internally displaced persons are primarily the responsibility of States, in appropriate cooperation with the international community;
9. Urges all States and relevant non-governmental and other organizations, in conjunction with the Office of the High Commissioner, in a spirit of international solidarity and burden- and responsibility-sharing, to cooperate and to mobilize resources with a view to enhancing the capacity of and reducing the heavy burden borne by host countries, in particular those that have received large numbers of refugees and asylum-seekers, and calls upon the Office to continue to play its catalytic role in mobilizing assistance from the international community to address the root causes as well as the economic, environmental and social impact of large-scale refugee populations in developing countries, in particular the least developed countries, and countries with economies in transition. 
UN General Assembly, Res. 61/137, 19 December 2006, §§ 6 and 8–9, adopted without a vote.
UN General Assembly
In a resolution adopted in 2006 on assistance to refugees, returnees and displaced persons in Africa, the UN General Assembly:
5. Expresses its appreciation for the leadership shown by the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, and commends the Office for its ongoing efforts, with the support of the international community, to assist African countries of asylum and to respond to the protection and assistance needs of refugees, returnees and displaced persons in Africa;
11. Calls upon the international community, including States and the Office of the High Commissioner and other relevant United Nations organizations, within their respective mandates, to take concrete action to meet the protection and assistance needs of refugees, returnees and displaced persons and to contribute generously to projects and programmes aimed at alleviating their plight and facilitating durable solutions for refugees and displaced persons;
13. Also reaffirms that respect by States for their protection responsibilities towards refugees is strengthened by international solidarity involving all members of the international community and that the refugee protection regime is enhanced through committed international cooperation in a spirit of solidarity and burden- and responsibility-sharing among all States;
17. Calls upon the Office of the High Commissioner, the African Union, subregional organizations and all African States, in conjunction with agencies of the United Nations system, intergovernmental and non-governmental organizations and the international community, to strengthen and revitalize existing partnerships and forge new ones in support of the international refugee protection system;
18. Calls upon the Office of the High Commissioner, the international community and other concerned entities to intensify their support to African Governments through appropriate capacity-building activities, including training of relevant officers, disseminating information about refugee instruments and principles, providing financial, technical and advisory services to accelerate the enactment or amendment and implementation of legislation relating to refugees, strengthening emergency response and enhancing capacities for the coordination of humanitarian activities;
24. Urges the international community, in the spirit of international solidarity and burden-sharing, to continue to fund generously the refugee programmes of the Office of the High Commissioner and, taking into account the substantially increased needs of programmes in Africa, inter alia, as a result of repatriation possibilities, to ensure that Africa receives a fair and equitable share of the resources designated for refugees. 
UN General Assembly, Res. 61/139, 19 December 2006, §§ 5, 11, 13, 17–18 and 24, adopted without a vote.
UN General Assembly
In a resolution adopted in 2006 on the universal realization of the right of peoples to self-determination, the UN General Assembly:
Expressing grave concern that … millions of people have been and are being uprooted from their homes as refugees and displaced persons, and emphasizing the urgent need for concerted international action to alleviate their condition. 
UN General Assembly, Res. 61/150, 19 December 2006, preamble, adopted without a vote.
UN General Assembly
In a resolution adopted in 2006 on the human rights situation arising from the recent Israeli military operations in Lebanon, the UN General Assembly:
Calls upon the international community to urgently provide the Government of Lebanon with financial assistance in support of the national early recovery, reconstruction and enhancing the national economy, including the rehabilitation of victims, return of displaced persons and restoration of the essential infrastructure … 
UN General Assembly, Res. 61/154, 19 December 2006, § 8, voting record: 112-7-64-9.
UN General Assembly
In a resolution adopted in 2006 on the situation of human rights in Myanmar, the UN General Assembly strongly called upon the Government of Myanmar “to provide the necessary protection and assistance to internally displaced persons, in cooperation with the international community”. 
UN General Assembly, Res. 61/232, 22 December 2006, § 3(d), voting record: 82-25-45--40.
UN General Assembly
In a resolution adopted in 2007 on cooperation between the United Nations and the African Union, the UN General Assembly:
Stressing the urgent need to address the plight of refugees and internally displaced persons in Africa,
18. Also urges the United Nations system to continue to implement resolution 58/149 of 22 December 2003 on assistance to refugees, returnees and displaced persons in Africa, and effectively to support African countries in their effort to incorporate the problems of refugees into national and regional development plans. 
UN General Assembly, Res. 61/296, 17 September 2007, preamble and § 18, adopted without a vote.
UN General Assembly
In a resolution adopted in 2007 on the situation in Afghanistan, the UN General Assembly:
41. Expresses its appreciation to those Governments that continue to host Afghan refugees, acknowledging the huge burden they have so far shouldered in this regard, and reminds them of their obligations under international refugee law with respect to the protection of refugees, the principle of voluntary return and the right to seek asylum and to allow international access for their protection and care;
42. Urges the Government of Afghanistan, acting with the support of the international community, to continue and strengthen its efforts to create the conditions for the voluntary, safe, dignified and sustainable return and reintegration of the remaining Afghan refugees and internally displaced persons;
44. Calls for the provision of continued international assistance to the large numbers of Afghan refugees and internally displaced persons to facilitate their voluntary, safe, dignified and orderly return and sustainable reintegration into society so as to contribute to the stability of the entire country. 
UN General Assembly, Res. 62/6, 11 November 2007, §§ 41–42 and 44, adopted without a vote.
UN General Assembly
In a resolution adopted in 2007 on the strengthening of the coordination of emergency humanitarian assistance of the United Nations, the UN General Assembly:
Recognizes the Guiding Principles on Internal Displacement as an important international framework for the protection of internally displaced persons, encourages Member States and humanitarian agencies to continue to work together in endeavours to provide a more predictable response to the needs of internally displaced persons, and in this regard calls for international support, upon request, to capacity-building efforts of States. 
UN General Assembly, Res. 62/94, 17 December 2007, § 23, adopted without a vote.
UN General Assembly
In a resolution adopted in 2007 on persons displaced as a result of the June 1967 and subsequent hostilities, the UN General Assembly:
3. Endorses, in the meanwhile, the efforts of the Commissioner-General of the United Nations Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees in the Near East to continue to provide humanitarian assistance, as far as practicable, on an emergency basis, and as a temporary measure, to persons in the area who are currently displaced and in serious need of continued assistance as a result of the June 1967 and subsequent hostilities;
4. Strongly appeals to all Governments and to organizations and individuals to contribute generously to the Agency and to the other intergovernmental and non-governmental organizations concerned for the above-mentioned purposes. 
UN General Assembly, Res. 62/103, 17 December 2007, §§ 3–4, voting record: 171-6-2-13.
UN General Assembly
In a resolution adopted in 2007 on UNRWA operations, the UN General Assembly:
1. Expresses its appreciation to the Commissioner-General of the United Nations Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees in the Near East, as well as to all of the staff of the Agency, for their tireless efforts and valuable work, particularly in the light of the difficult conditions during the past year;
5. Endorses, meanwhile, the efforts of the Commissioner-General to continue to provide humanitarian assistance, as far as practicable, on an emergency basis, and as a temporary measure, to persons in the area who are internally displaced and in serious need of continued assistance as a result of recent incursions in the Occupied Palestinian Territory and hostilities in Lebanon;
6. Acknowledges the important support provided by the host Governments to the Agency in the discharge of its duties. 
UN General Assembly, Res. 62/104, 17 December 2007, §§ 1 and 5–6, voting record: 170-6-3-13.
UN General Assembly
In a resolution adopted in 2007 on the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, the UN General Assembly:
6. Re-emphasizes that the protection of refugees is primarily the responsibility of States, whose full and effective cooperation, action and political resolve are required to enable the Office of the High Commissioner to fulfil its mandated functions, and strongly emphasizes, in this context, the importance of active international solidarity and burden- and responsibility-sharing;
8. Further re-emphasizes that protection of and assistance to internally displaced persons are primarily the responsibility of States, in appropriate cooperation with the international community;
26. Notes the increasing number of displaced in and from Iraq and the impact of those flows of persons on the social and economic situation of countries in the region, expresses its appreciation for the convening of an international conference in April 2007 at Geneva in order to sensitize the international community to the deteriorating plight of those persons inside Iraq and outside its borders, and calls upon the international community to act in a targeted and coordinated manner to provide protection and increased assistance to the persons displaced to enable the countries in the region to strengthen their capacity to respond to the needs in partnership with the Office of the High Commissioner, other United Nations agencies, the International Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement and non-governmental organizations;
27. Urges all States and relevant non-governmental and other organizations, in conjunction with the Office of the High Commissioner, in a spirit of international solidarity and burden- and responsibility-sharing, to cooperate and to mobilize resources with a view to enhancing the capacity of and reducing the heavy burden borne by host countries, in particular those that have received large numbers of refugees and asylum-seekers, and calls upon the Office to continue to play its catalytic role in mobilizing assistance from the international community to address the root causes as well as the economic, environmental and social impact of large-scale refugee populations in developing countries, in particular the least developed countries, and countries with economies in transition. 
UN General Assembly, Res. 62/124, 18 December 2007, §§ 6, 8 and 26–27, adopted without a vote.
UN General Assembly
In a resolution adopted in 2007 on assistance to refugees, returnees and displaced persons in Africa, the UN General Assembly:
5. Expresses its appreciation for the leadership shown by the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, and commends the Office for its ongoing efforts, with the support of the international community, to assist African countries of asylum and to respond to the protection and assistance needs of refugees, returnees and displaced persons in Africa;
13. Calls upon the international community, including States and the Office of the High Commissioner and other relevant United Nations organizations, within their respective mandates, to take concrete action to meet the protection and assistance needs of refugees, returnees and displaced persons and to contribute generously to projects and programmes aimed at alleviating their plight and facilitating durable solutions for refugees and displaced persons;
15. Also reaffirms that respect by States for their protection responsibilities towards refugees is strengthened by international solidarity involving all members of the international community and that the refugee protection regime is enhanced through committed international cooperation in a spirit of solidarity and burden- and responsibility-sharing among all States;
19. Calls upon the Office of the High Commissioner, the African Union, subregional organizations and all African States, in conjunction with agencies of the United Nations system, intergovernmental and non-governmental organizations and the international community, to strengthen and revitalize existing partnerships and forge new ones in support of the protection system for refugees, asylum-seekers and internally displaced persons;
20. Calls upon the Office of the High Commissioner, the international community and other concerned entities to intensify their support to African Governments through appropriate capacity-building activities, including training of relevant officers, disseminating information about refugee instruments and principles, providing financial, technical and advisory services to accelerate the enactment or amendment and implementation of legislation relating to refugees, strengthening emergency response and enhancing capacities for the coordination of humanitarian activities, in particular those Governments that have received large numbers of refugees and asylum-seekers;
26. Urges the international community, in the spirit of international solidarity and burden-sharing, to continue to fund generously the refugee programmes of the Office of the High Commissioner and, taking into account the substantially increased needs of programmes in Africa, inter alia, as a result of repatriation possibilities, to ensure that Africa receives a fair and equitable share of the resources designated for refugees. 
UN General Assembly, Res. 62/125, 18 December 2007, §§ 5, 13, 15, 19–20 and 26, adopted without a vote.
UN General Assembly
In a resolution adopted in 2007 on the universal realization of the right of peoples to self-determination, the UN General Assembly:
Expressing grave concern that … millions of people have been and are being uprooted from their homes as refugees and displaced persons, and emphasizing the urgent need for concerted international action to alleviate their condition. 
UN General Assembly, Res. 62/144, 18 December 2007, preamble, adopted without a vote.
UN General Assembly
In a resolution adopted in 2007 on the protection of and assistance to internally displaced persons, the UN General Assembly:
Deeply disturbed by the alarmingly high numbers of internally displaced persons throughout the world, for reasons including armed conflict, violations of human rights and natural or human-made disasters, who receive inadequate protection and assistance, and conscious of the serious challenges that this is creating for the international community,
Emphasizing that States have the primary responsibility to provide protection and assistance to internally displaced persons within their jurisdiction as well as to address the root causes of the displacement problem in appropriate cooperation with the international community,
Acknowledging with appreciation the important and independent contribution of the International Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement and other humanitarian agencies in protecting and assisting internally displaced persons, in cooperation with relevant international bodies,
5. Expresses its appreciation to those Governments and intergovernmental and non-governmental organizations that have provided protection and assistance to internally displaced persons and have supported the work of the Representative of the Secretary-General;
15. Calls upon Governments to provide protection and assistance, including reintegration and development assistance, to internally displaced persons, and to facilitate the efforts of relevant United Nations agencies and humanitarian organizations in these respects, including by further improving access to internally displaced persons;
21. Welcomes the initiatives undertaken by regional organizations, such as the African Union, the Organization of American States, the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe, the Intergovernmental Authority on Development, the Council of Europe, the Commonwealth and the Economic Community of West African States, to address the protection, assistance and development needs of internally displaced persons, and encourages them and other regional organizations to strengthen their activities and their cooperation with the Representative of the Secretary-General. 
UN General Assembly, Res. 62/153, 18 December 2007, preamble and §§ 5, 15 and 21, adopted without a vote.
UN Economic and Social Council
In a resolution adopted in 2003 on the strengthening of the coordination of emergency humanitarian assistance of the United Nations, ECOSOC:
7. Calls upon all Governments and parties in complex humanitarian emergencies, in particular in armed conflicts and in post-conflict situations, in countries in which humanitarian personnel are operating, in conformity with the relevant provisions of international law and national laws, to cooperate fully with the United Nations and other humanitarian agencies and organizations and to ensure the safe and unhindered access of humanitarian personnel, as well as supplies and equipment, in order to allow them to perform efficiently their task of assisting the affected civilian population, including refugees and internally displaced persons;
9. Notes that an increasing number of States, United Nations organizations and regional and non-governmental organizations are making use of the Guiding Principles on Internal Displacement, encourages the strengthening of legal frameworks for the protection of internally displaced persons, and urges the international community to strengthen its support to affected States in their efforts to provide, through national plans or initiatives, protection and assistance to their internally displaced persons. 
ECOSOC, Res. 2003/5, 15 July 2003, §§ 7 and 9, adopted without a vote.
UN Economic and Social Council
In a resolution adopted in 2003 on the situation of and assistance to Palestinian women, ECOSOC:
4. Calls upon Israel to facilitate the return of all refugees and displaced Palestinian women and children to their homes and properties, in compliance with the relevant United Nations resolutions;
5. Calls upon the international community to continue to provide urgently needed assistance and services in an effort to alleviate the dire humanitarian crisis being faced by Palestinian women and their families. 
ECOSOC, Res. 2003/42, 22 July 2003, §§ 4–5, voting record: 42-2-4.
UN Economic and Social Council
In a resolution adopted in 2003 on the situation of women and girls in Afghanistan, ECOSOC welcomed “the efforts of Afghanistan’s neighbouring countries, which have hosted millions of Afghan refugees, especially women and children, and have provided humanitarian assistance in many areas, such as education, health and other basic services”. 
ECOSOC, Res. 2003/43, 22 July 2003, preamble, adopted without a vote.
UN Economic and Social Council
In a resolution adopted in 2004 on the situation of women and girls in Afghanistan, ECOSOC welcomed “the efforts of Afghanistan’s neighbouring countries, which host millions of Afghan refugees, especially women and children, and have provided humanitarian assistance in many areas, such as education, health and other basic services”. 
ECOSOC, Res. 2004/10, 21 July 2004, preamble, adopted without a vote.
UN Commission on Human Rights
In a resolution adopted in 2003 on the situation of human rights in Burundi, the UN Commission on Human Rights:
Expresses its concern at the situation of displaced persons, deplores in particular the unacceptable living conditions in the displaced persons sites and recommends that the Transitional Government, United Nations specialized agencies and non-governmental organizations provide humanitarian assistance. 
UN Commission on Human Rights, Res. 2003/16, 17 April 2003, § 8, adopted without a vote.
UN Commission on Human Rights
In a resolution adopted in 2003 on internally displaced persons, the UN Commission on Human Rights:
Emphasizing the primary responsibility of national authorities to provide protection and assistance to internally displaced persons within their jurisdiction, as well as to address the root causes of their displacement in appropriate cooperation with the international community,
9. Expresses its appreciation to Governments and intergovernmental and non-governmental organizations which have provided assistance and protection to internally displaced persons, developed policies to address their plight and supported the work of the Representative of the Secretary-General;
10. Calls upon Governments to provide protection and assistance, including reintegration and development assistance, to internally displaced persons, to develop national policies aimed at addressing their plight, as well as to ensure that they benefit from public services, in particular basic social services such as health services and education, based on the principle of non-discrimination, and to facilitate the efforts of relevant United Nations agencies and humanitarian organizations in these respects, including by improving access to internally displaced persons;
12. Stresses the need to further strengthen inter-agency arrangements and the capacities of United Nations agencies and other relevant actors to meet the immense humanitarian challenge of internal displacement, and calls upon States to provide adequate resources for programmes to assist and protect internally displaced persons with a view to enhancing the capacities of countries with situations of internal displacement, and of the relevant intergovernmental and non-governmental organizations, to meet the needs of internally displaced persons;
17. Acknowledges with appreciation the work of the International Committee of the Red Cross and the other components of the International Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement in protecting and assisting internally displaced persons. 
UN Commission on Human Rights, Res. 2003/51, 23 April 2003, preamble and §§ 9–10, 12 and 17, adopted without a vote.
UN Commission on Human Rights
In a resolution adopted in 2003 on human rights and mass exoduses, the UN Commission on Human Rights:
4. Emphasizes the responsibility of all States and international organizations to cooperate with those countries, particularly developing countries, affected by mass exoduses of refugees and displaced persons, and calls upon Governments, the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights, the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, other relevant parts of the United Nations system and other humanitarian and development organizations to continue to respond to the assistance and protection needs which exist in countries hosting large numbers of refugees and displaced persons until durable solutions are found.  
UN Commission on Human Rights, Res. 2003/52, 24 April 2003, § 4, adopted without a vote.
UN Commission on Human Rights
In a resolution adopted in 2003 on assistance to Somalia in the field of human rights, the UN Commission on Human Rights:
Calls upon:
(n) All relevant authorities and Member States to provide support for the voluntary return and reintegration of Somali refugees and the provision of urgent humanitarian assistance to, and protection for, those who have been internally displaced;
(o) All Member States to continue to provide increased assistance in response to the United Nations appeals for relief, rehabilitation and reconstruction efforts in all regions, including those aimed at the strengthening of civil society, encouraging good governance and the re-establishment of the rule of law, and to support the development of a culture of human rights and other activities of the Office of the High Commissioner concerning Somalia. 
UN Commission on Human Rights, Res. 2003/78, 25 April 2003, § 8(n)–(o), adopted without a vote.
UN Commission on Human Rights
In a resolution adopted in 2004 on the protection of United Nations personnel, the UN Commission on Human Rights called upon States and all others concerned:
To cooperate fully, in conformity with relevant provisions of international law, with United Nations and associated personnel and other personnel carrying out activities in fulfilment of the mandate of a United Nations operation and to ensure their safe and unhindered access in order to allow them to perform efficiently their task of assisting the affected civilian population, including refugees and internally displaced persons. 
UN Commission on Human Rights, Res. 2004/77, 21 April 2004, § 4(j), adopted without a vote.
UN Commission on Human Rights
In a resolution adopted in 2004 concerning internally displaced persons, the UN Commission on Human Rights:
Emphasizing the primary responsibility of national authorities to provide protection and assistance to internally displaced persons within their jurisdiction, as well as to address the root causes of their displacement in appropriate cooperation with the international community,
8. Expresses its appreciation to Governments and intergovernmental and nongovernmental organizations which have provided assistance and protection to internally displaced persons, developed policies to address their plight and supported the work of the Representative of the SecretaryGeneral;
9. Calls upon Governments to provide protection and assistance, including reintegration and development assistance, to internally displaced persons, to develop national policies aimed at addressing their plight, as well as to ensure that they benefit from public services, in particular basic social services such as health services and education, based on the principle of non-discrimination, and to facilitate the efforts of relevant United Nations agencies and humanitarian organizations in these respects, including by improving access to internally displaced persons;
12. Stresses the need to strengthen further interagency arrangements and the capacities of United Nations agencies and other relevant actors to meet the immense humanitarian challenge of internal displacement, and calls upon States to provide adequate resources for programmes to assist and protect internally displaced persons with a view to enhancing the capacities of countries with situations of internal displacement, and of the relevant intergovernmental and nongovernmental organizations, to meet the needs of internally displaced persons;
17. Acknowledges with appreciation the work of the International Committee of the Red Cross and the other components of the International Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement in protecting and assisting internally displaced persons. 
UN Commission on Human Rights, Res. 2004/55, 20 April 2004, preamble and §§ 8–9, 12 and 17, adopted without a vote.
UN Commission on Human Rights
In a resolution adopted in 2004 on assistance to Somalia in the field of human rights, the UN Commission on Human Rights:
Calls upon:
(h) All relevant authorities and Member States to provide support for the voluntary return and reintegration of Somali refugees and the provision of urgent and extensive humanitarian assistance to, and protection for, those who have been internally displaced;
(i) All relevant international stakeholders to support the United Nations Joint Action and Recovery Plan for Somalia, which seeks to find sustainable solutions for the reintegration and resettlement of internally displaced persons. 
UN Commission on Human Rights, Res. 2004/80, 21 April 2004, § 11(h)–(i), adopted without a vote.
UN Commission on Human Rights
In a resolution adopted in 2004 on technical cooperation and advisory services in Liberia, the UN Commission on Human Rights called upon the international community:
To mobilize the necessary resources to enable the National Transitional Government to implement relief and recovery programmes, including repatriation and resettlement of internally displaced persons and refugees, and, to this end, to implement the decisions taken by the International Reconstruction Conference for Liberia. 
UN Commission on Human Rights, Res. 2004/83, 21 April 2004, § 6(b), adopted without a vote.
UN Commission on Human Rights
In a resolution adopted in 2005 on the abduction of children in Africa, the UN Commission on Human Rights:
Requests the international community, including donor countries and relevant United Nations bodies, to complement and supplement the efforts of African States and African regional mechanisms in providing the necessary assistance, including technical assistance, in order, first, to devise with the participation of children, their families and communities appropriate programmes to combat abduction of children and to protect them, including refugee and internally displaced children, especially unaccompanied and separated children, who are exposed to the risk of being abducted, and, second, to develop and implement programmes for the reintegration, including rehabilitation, of children in the peace process and in the postconflict recovery and reconstruction phase. 
UN Commission on Human Rights, Res. 2005/43, 19 April 2005, § 10, adopted without a vote.
UN Commission on Human Rights
In a resolution adopted in 2005 on internally displaced persons, the UN Commission on Human Rights:
Conscious of the human rights and humanitarian dimensions of the problem of internally displaced persons, who often do not receive adequate protection and assistance, and aware of the serious challenge this is creating for the international community and of the responsibility of States and the international community to strengthen methods and means to better address the specific protection and assistance needs of internally displaced persons,
Emphasizing the primary responsibility of national authorities to provide protection and assistance to internally displaced persons within their jurisdiction during all stages of the displacement cycle, as well as to address the root causes of their displacement in appropriate cooperation with the international community,
9. Expresses its appreciation to Governments and intergovernmental and nongovernmental organizations that have provided assistance and protection to internally displaced persons, developed policies to address their plight and supported the work of the Representative of the SecretaryGeneral;
10. Calls upon Governments to provide protection and assistance, including reintegration and development assistance, to internally displaced persons, to develop national policies aimed at addressing their plight, as well as to ensure that they benefit from public services, in particular basic social services such as health services and education, based on the principle of nondiscrimination, and to facilitate the efforts of relevant United Nations agencies and humanitarian organizations in these respects, including by improving access to internally displaced persons;
11. Urges all those concerned, as set forth in international humanitarian law, including the Geneva Conventions, of 12 August 1949, and the Regulations of 18 October 1907 annexed to the Hague Convention IV concerning the Laws and Customs of War on Land, to allow full unimpeded access by humanitarian personnel to all people in need of assistance, and to make available, as far as possible, all necessary facilities for their operations, and to promote the safety, security and freedom of movement of humanitarian personnel and the United Nations and its associated personnel and their assets;
12. Encourages all Governments, in particular Governments of countries with situations of internal displacement, to facilitate United Nations activities and to respond favourably to requests for visits as well as for information, and urges Governments as well as the relevant parts of the United Nations system, also at the country level, to follow up effectively on United Nations recommendations and to make available information on measures taken in this regard;
14. Notes with appreciation the activities aimed at addressing the plight of internally displaced persons undertaken by all relevant humanitarian assistance, human rights and development agencies and organizations, including nongovernmental organizations, and encourages them to enhance further their collaboration and coordination with regard to internally displaced persons, especially through the InterAgency Standing Committee;
17. Acknowledges with appreciation the work of the International Committee of the Red Cross and the other components of the International Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement in protecting and assisting internally displaced persons;
18. Notes with appreciation the efforts of nongovernmental organizations and the increasing role of national human rights institutions in assisting internally displaced persons and in promoting and protecting their human rights;
19. Welcomes the initiatives undertaken by regional organizations, such as the African Union, the Organization of American States, the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe, the Intergovernmental Authority on Development, the Council of Europe, the Commonwealth and the Economic Community of West African States, to address the assistance, protection and development needs of internally displaced persons, and encourages them and other regional organizations to strengthen their activities in this regard. 
UN Commission on Human Rights, Res. 2005/46, 19 April 2005, preamble and §§ 9–12, 14 and 17–19, adopted without a vote.
UN Commission on Human Rights
In a resolution adopted in 2005 on human rights and mass exoduses, the UN Commission on Human Rights:
Emphasizes the responsibility of all States and international organizations to cooperate with those countries, particularly developing countries, affected by mass exoduses of refugees and displaced persons, and calls upon Governments, the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights, the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, other relevant parts of the United Nations system and other humanitarian and development organizations to continue to respond to the assistance and protection needs that exist in countries hosting large numbers of refugees and displaced persons until durable solutions are found, and notes in this regard conclusion No. 100 adopted by the Executive Committee of the Programme of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees.  
UN Commission on Human Rights, Res. 2005/48, 19 April 2005, § 4, adopted without a vote.
UN Commission on Human Rights
In a resolution adopted in 2005 on assistance to Somalia in the field of human rights, the UN Commission on Human Rights called upon:
The United Nations, nongovernmental organizations and the Bretton Woods institutions to … provide support for the voluntary return and reintegration of Somali refugees and the provision of urgent and extensive humanitarian assistance to, and protection for, those who have been internally displaced. 
UN Commission on Human Rights, Res. 2005/83, 21 April 2005, § 8(d), adopted without a vote.
UNHCR Executive Committee
In 1994, in its Conclusion on Internally Displaced Persons, the Executive Committee of UNHCR:
(f) Calls upon the international community, in appropriate circumstances, to provide timely and speedy humanitarian assistance and support to countries affected by internal displacement to help them fulfil their responsibility towards the displaced;
(h) Recognizes that actions by the international community, in consultation and coordination with the concerned State, on behalf of the internally displaced may contribute to the easing of tensions and the resolution of problems resulting in displacement, and constitute important components of a comprehensive approach to the prevention and solution of refugee problems. 
UNHCR, Executive Committee, Conclusion No. 75 (XLV): Internally Displaced Persons, 11 October 1994, §§ f and h.
UN Secretary-General (Representative)
In 1997, in a report on his visit to Mozambique, the Representative of the UN Secretary-General on Internally Displaced Persons stated:
Realizing its limited capacity to deliver the necessary humanitarian assistance, the Government requested support from the international community, and several United Nations organizations became involved in the mid-1980s. 
Representative of the UN Secretary-General on Internally Displaced Persons, Report on the Representative’s visit to Mozambique from 23 November to 3 December 1996, UN Doc. E/CN.4/1997/43/Add.1, 24 February 1997, § 49.
UN Commission on Human Rights (Special Rapporteur)
In 1996, during a debate in the UN Commission on Human Rights, the Special Rapporteur on the Situation of Human Rights in Afghanistan stated:
The international community was duty-bound to provide emergency assistance to the victims of the Afghan conflict … Minimum food, shelter and sanitation requirements must be provided immediately to those living in refugee camps and villages, and to returnees. The international community should continue to provide, and indeed increase, humanitarian assistance in the form of mine-clearance, support for voluntary repatriation, food, health, sanitation projects and other rehabilitation programmes. 
UN Commission on Human Rights, Special Rapporteur on the Situation of Human Rights in Afghanistan, Statement before the UN Commission on Human Rights, 16 April 1996, UN Doc. E/CN.4/1996/SR.42, 22 April 1996, § 19 .
High Representative for the Implementation of the Peace Agreement in Bosnia and Herzegovina
In 1996, the High Representative for the Implementation of the Peace Agreement in Bosnia and Herzegovina stated that “the leading role for implementation of [the Agreement] belongs to the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR)”, with the active support of the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights. 
High Representative for the Implementation of the Peace Agreement on Bosnia and Herzegovina, Report, UN Doc. S/1996/190, 14 March 1996, Annex, § 69.
OAU Council of Ministers
In several resolutions adopted in 1996, the OAU Council of Europe called upon the international community to provide refugees and displaced persons with humanitarian assistance. 
OAU, Council of Ministers, Res. 1649 (LXIV), 1–5 July 1996, § 12; Res. 1650 (LXIV), 1–5 July 1996, § 11; Res. 1653 (LXIV), 1–5 July 1996, § 7.
No data.
Human Rights Committee
In its concluding observations on the third periodic report of the Sudan in 2007, the Human Rights Committee stated:
The Committee notes the steps taken to facilitate humanitarian assistance … It remains concerned at the absence of measures to ensure the protection of displaced persons and humanitarian workers … (art. 12 of the Covenant)
In keeping with all international standards governing the matter, including the Guiding Principles on Internal Displacement, the State party should:
(b) Take appropriate steps to ensure the safety of humanitarian workers and their vehicles and supplies, and facilitate their access to the beneficiaries of humanitarian aid. 
Human Rights Committee, Concluding observations on the third periodic report of the Sudan, UN Doc. CCPR/C/SDN/CO/3, 29 August 2007, § 23.
[emphasis in original]
ICRC
In 1991, in a report to the UN Security Council concerning the situation in the former Yugoslavia, the UN Secretary-General reported that the ICRC had opened offices in affected areas and had been able “to provide assistance to about 60,000 displaced persons through its family parcels programme”. 
UN Secretary-General, Report pursuant to paragraph 3 of Security Council resolution 713 (1991), UN Doc. S/23169, 25 October 1991, Annex IV, § 2.
No data.