Related Rule
South Africa
Practice Relating to Rule 87. Humane Treatment
Section D. Persons deprived of their liberty
South Africa’s LOAC Manual (1996) states: “Soldiers who have surrendered or who are in the control of the enemy … must be protected.” 
South Africa, Presentation on the South African Approach to International Humanitarian Law, Appendix A, Chapter 4: International Humanitarian Law (The Law of Armed Conflict), National Defence Force, 1996, § 30.
South Africa’s Revised Civic Education Manual (2004) states: “Treatment of POWs [prisoners of war] must always be humane.” 
South Africa, Revised Civic Education Manual, South African National Defence Force, 2004, Chapter 4, § 77.
The manual also provides that prisoners of war are entitled to “[p]rotection against abuse”. 
South Africa, Revised Civic Education Manual, South African National Defence Force, 2004, Chapter 4, § 74.
Furthermore, the manual provides that the mistreatment of prisoners of war is a grave breach of the law of armed conflict and a war crime. 
South Africa, Revised Civic Education Manual, South African National Defence Force, 2004, Chapter 4, § 57.
South Africa’s LOAC Teaching Manual (2008) states:
1.2 Reasons for compliance with LOAC [law of armed conflict] and basic principles thereof.
Fundamental Norms and Values (rules)
The fundamental norms/val[u]es which underlie the LOAC are:
- Persons who are hors de combat (out of combat) and those who do not take a direct part in hostilities are entitled to respect for their lives and their moral and physical integrity. They must in all circumstances be protected and treated humanely without any adverse distinction.
- Captured combatants and civilians under the authority of an adverse party are entitled to respect for their lives, dignity, personal rights and convictions. They must be protected against all acts of violence and retaliation. …
- All persons who are captured or under the authority of an adverse party are entitled to, as a minimum, the protection and guarantees bestowed upon prisoners of war (POW).
1.3 Relationship between LOAC and Human Rights Law and Fundamental Protection Provided under LOAC.
Fundamental Protection under the LOAC
The LOAC grants fundamental protection to persons and objects other than combatants and military objectives. This protection applies to all persons in the power of belligerent parties and neutral states. The protection corresponds to basic humanitarian principles applicable to most nations.
The legal basis for this fundamental protection is found in international treaties.
Examples of the wording of these fundamental rules are:
- POWs must at all times be humanely treated ([1949] Geneva Convention III article 13).
1.5 Application of LOAC during armed conflict []to the position of participants and non-participants
- Minimum Protection of Persons Who Participated in Hostilities. Article 45.3 read with article 75.1 Additional Protocol I determines that any person who has taken part in hostilities and any other person who is in the power of a Party to a conflict, who is not entitled [to] POW status and who does not benefit from more favourable treatment under the Conventions and the Protocol shall be treated humanely and shall enjoy, as a minimum, the protection of fundamental judicial guarantees without any adverse distinction founded on race, colour, religion or faith, sex, birth or wealth, or any other similar criteria.
Conclusion
Any person in the power of a Party to a conflict, who is not entitled [to] POW status and who does not benefit from more favourable treatment under the LOAC shall be treated humanely and shall enjoy, as a minimum, the protection of fundamental judicial guarantees without any adverse distinction founded on race, colour, religion or faith, sex, birth or wealth, or any other similar criteria. 
South Africa, Advanced Law of Armed Conflict Teaching Manual, School of Military Justice, 1 April 2008, as amended to 25 October 2013, Learning Unit 1, pp. 13, 16–17, 21, 23, 36 and 40–41.
The manual also states:
Treatment of POW
POW must be treated humanely in all circumstances. …
While awaiting evacuation to a base camp, captured combatants shall:
- be protected against violence, insult and intimidation;
The wounded, sick and shipwrecked POW shall always be treated humanely and be protected and cared for as the tactical situation allows.
POW must be protected against all acts of violence, intimidation and public curiosity.
Conclusion
From the moment combatant[]s fall into the power of an enemy, they are entitled to protection as POW. They shall always be treated humanely.
POW must be treated humanely in all circumstances. 
South Africa, Advanced Law of Armed Conflict Teaching Manual, School of Military Justice, 1 April 2008, as amended to 25 October 2013, Learning Unit 2, pp. 95 and 100–101.
South Africa’s Implementation of the Geneva Conventions Act (2012) states: “A protected prisoner of war who is in the custody of the South African National Defence Force must be granted the protection of the [1949] Third [Geneva] Convention or the [1949] Fourth [Geneva] Convention, as the case may be.” 
South Africa, Implementation of the Geneva Conventions Act, 2012, Section 12(2).
The Act defines a “protected prisoner of war” as a “person protected by the Third Convention or a person who is protected as a prisoner of war under [the 1977 Additional] Protocol I”. 
South Africa, Implementation of the Geneva Conventions Act, 2012, Section 1.