Related Rule
South Africa
Practice Relating to Rule 7. The Principle of Distinction between Civilian Objects and Military Objectives
South Africa’s LOAC Manual (1996) instructs soldiers: “Attack only military objectives.” 
South Africa, Presentation on the South African Approach to International Humanitarian Law, Appendix A, Chapter 4: International Humanitarian Law (The Law of Armed Conflict), National Defence Force, 1996, § 25(b).
South Africa’s Revised Civic Education Manual (2004) provides that soldiers in combat must “[a]ttack only military targets”. 
South Africa, Revised Civic Education Manual, South African National Defence Force, 2004, Chapter 4, § 48.
South Africa’s LOAC Manual (1996) provides: “The general rule is that civilians and civilian property may not be the subject, or the sole object, of a military attack.” 
South Africa, Presentation on the South African Approach to International Humanitarian Law, Appendix A, Chapter 4: International Humanitarian Law (The Law of Armed Conflict), National Defence Force, 1996, § 28(a).
South Africa’s Revised Civic Education Manual (2004) states: “The general rule is that … civilian property may not be the subject, or the sole object, of a military attack.” 
South Africa, Revised Civic Education Manual, South African National Defence Force, 2004, Chapter 4, § 50(a).
The manual also provides that “[a]ny unlawful attack on a clearly recognised protected object” is a grave breach of the law of armed conflict and a war crime. 
South Africa, Revised Civic Education Manual, South African National Defence Force, 2004, Chapter 4, § 57.
South Africa’s ICC Act (2002) reproduces the war crimes listed in the 1998 ICC Statute, including “intentionally directing attacks against civilian objects” in international armed conflicts. 
South Africa, ICC Act, 2002, Schedule 1, Part 3, § (b)(ii).