Related Rule
South Africa
Practice Relating to Rule 50. Destruction and Seizure of Property of an Adversary
South Africa’s LOAC Manual (1996) states that soldiers must “restrict destruction to that required by the mission”. 
South Africa, Presentation on the South African Approach to International Humanitarian Law, Appendix A, Chapter 4: International Humanitarian Law (The Law of Armed Conflict), National Defence Force, 1996, § 25(d).
The manual also considers “purposeless destruction” and “extensive destruction and appropriation of property, not justified by military necessity and carried out unlawfully and wantonly,” to be grave breaches of the 1949 Geneva Conventions and war crimes. 
South Africa, LOAC Manual (1996), Presentation on the South African Approach to International Humanitarian Law, Appendix A, Chapter 4: International Humanitarian Law (The Law of Armed Conflict), National Defence Force, 1996, §§ 39(h), 40 and 41.
South Africa’s Revised Civic Education Manual (2004) provides that soldiers in combat must “[r]estrict destruction to that required by the mission”. 
South Africa, Revised Civic Education Manual, South African National Defence Force, 2004, Chapter 4, § 48(a).
The manual also states that the destruction of civilian property is forbidden. 
South Africa, Revised Civic Education Manual, South African National Defence Force, 2004, Chapter 4, § 50(f).
Furthermore, the manual provides that “[a]cts not justified by military necessity and which are carried out unlawfully and wantonly, causing extensive destruction of property or extensive appropriation of property” are grave breaches of the law of armed conflict and war crimes. 
South Africa, Revised Civic Education Manual, South African National Defence Force, 2004, Chapter 4, § 57.
South Africa’s ICC Act (2002) reproduces the war crimes listed in the 1998 ICC Statute, including “extensive destruction and appropriation of property, not justified by military necessity and carried out unlawfully and wantonly” in international armed conflicts and “destroying or seizing the enemy’s property unless such destruction or seizure be imperatively demanded by the necessities” of the conflict in both international and non-international armed conflicts. 
South Africa, ICC Act, 2002, Schedule 1, Part 3, §§ (a)(iv), (b)(xiii) and (e)(xii).