Related Rule
South Africa
Practice Relating to Rule 47. Attacks against Persons Hors de Combat
South Africa’s LOAC Manual (1996) notes that “making a person who is ‘out of combat’ … the object of attack knowing that that person is out of combat” is a grave breach of the 1977 Additional Protocol I and a war crime. 
South Africa, Presentation on the South African Approach to International Humanitarian Law, Appendix A, Chapter 4: International Humanitarian Law (The Law of Armed Conflict), National Defence Force, 1996, §§ 37(c) and 41.
South Africa’s Revised Civic Education Manual (2004) provides that “[a]ny attack on persons known to be ‘hors de combat’ (out of combat)” is a grave breach of the law of armed conflict and a war crime. 
South Africa, Revised Civic Education Manual, South African National Defence Force, 2004, Chapter 4, § 57.
South Africa’s ICC Act (2002) reproduces the war crimes listed in the 1998 ICC Statute, including “killing or wounding a combatant who, having laid down his arms or having no longer means of defence, has surrendered at discretion” in international armed conflicts and “violence to life and person” on “those placed hors de combat by sickness, wounds, detention or any other cause” in non-international armed conflicts. 
South Africa, ICC Act, 2002, Schedule 1, Part 3, §§ (b)(vi) and (c)(i).
South Africa’s LOAC Manual (1996) states that “making a person … who is wounded or has surrendered … the object of attack knowing that that person is out of combat” constitutes a grave breach of the 1977 Additional Protocol I and a war crime. 
South Africa, Presentation on the South African Approach to International Humanitarian Law, Appendix A, Chapter 4: International Humanitarian Law (The Law of Armed Conflict), National Defence Force, 1996, §§ 37(c) and 41.
The manual explains: “Surrender may be by any means that communicates the intention to give up.” 
South Africa, Presentation on the South African Approach to International Humanitarian Law, Appendix A, Chapter 4: International Humanitarian Law (The Law of Armed Conflict), National Defence Force, 1996, § 30, note 1.
South Africa’s Revised Civic Education Manual (2004) states: “Soldiers who have surrendered or who are in the control of the enemy … must be protected.” 
South Africa, Revised Civic Education Manual, South African National Defence Force, 2004, Chapter 4, § 52.
South Africa’s ICC Act (2002) reproduces the war crimes listed in the 1998 ICC Statute, including “killing or wounding a combatant who, having laid down his arms or having no longer means of defence, has surrendered at discretion” in international armed conflicts and “violence to life and person” on “those placed hors de combat by sickness, wounds, detention or any other cause” in non-international armed conflicts. 
South Africa, ICC Act, 2002, Schedule 1, Part 3, §§ (b)(vi) and (c)(i).