Related Rule
South Africa
Practice Relating to Rule 29. Medical Transports
South Africa’s LOAC Manual (1996) provides:
53. All means of medical transport, whether permanent or temporary, must be assigned exclusively to medical purposes in order to be entitled to protection. A convoy carrying both wounded and able-bodied soldiers or arms would lose the right to protection to the detriment of the wounded. (Note: the presence of light arms which have just been taken from the wounded and not yet turned over to the proper authority is permitted.)
54. The term “respect” for the means of medical transport indicates that they may not be attacked or damaged, nor may their passage be obstructed; put positively, they must be permitted to carry out their assigned tasks. 
South Africa, Presentation on the South African Approach to International Humanitarian Law, Appendix A, Chapter 4: International Humanitarian Law (The Law of Armed Conflict), National Defence Force, 1996, §§ 53–54.
[emphasis in original]
South Africa’s Revised Civic Education Manual (2004) states:
67. Medical Transportation. The following definitions are relevant under this heading:
a. “Medical transportation” means the conveyance by land, water or air of wounded, sick or shipwrecked persons, medical and religious personnel and medical material.
b. “Medical transports” cover any means of transport, military or civilian, permanent or temporary, assigned exclusively to medical transportation and under the control of a competent authority of a Party to a conflict.
68. All means of medical transport, whether permanent or temporary, must be assigned exclusively to medical purposes in order to be entitled to protection. A convoy carrying both wounded and able-bodied soldiers or arms would lose the right to protection to the detriment of the wounded. (Note: the presence of light arms which have just been taken from the wounded and not yet turned over to the proper authority is permitted).
69. The term “respect” for the means of medical transport indicates that they may not be attacked or damaged, nor may their passage be obstructed. They must be permitted to carry out their assigned tasks. Medical transports by land and medical ships and craft must be respected and protected in the same way as mobile medical units. Military ambulances falling into enemy hands are subject to the law of war on the condition that the Party capturing them assumes responsibility for the sick and wounded contained therein. 
South Africa, Revised Civic Education Manual, South African National Defence Force, 2004, Chapter 4, §§ 67–69.
According to [1977] Additional Protocol I article 14 and [1949] Geneva Convention I article 33, “medical material” means any medical equipment or supplies, as well as the resources used exclusively for the provision of adequate medical services and care for the wounded and sick. 
South Africa, Advanced Law of Armed Conflict Teaching Manual, School of Military Justice, 1 April 2008, as amended to 25 October 2013, Learning Unit 2, p. 64.
[emphasis in original]
South Africa’s LOAC Manual (1996) provides: “Medical transport by air must also be respected, even in the absence of any overflying rights, after they have been recognised as medical aircraft.” 
South Africa, Presentation on the South African Approach to International Humanitarian Law, Appendix A, Chapter 4: International Humanitarian Law (The Law of Armed Conflict), National Defence Force, 1996, § 54.
South Africa’s Revised Civic Education Manual (2004) states: “Medical transport by air must also be respected, even in the absence of any overflying rights, after they have been recognised as medical aircraft.” 
South Africa, Revised Civic Education Manual, South African National Defence Force, 2004, Chapter 4, § 69.
South Africa’s Revised Civic Education Manual (2004) states:
67. Medical Transportation. The following definitions are relevant under this heading:
a. “Medical transportation” means the conveyance by land, water or air of wounded, sick or shipwrecked persons, medical and religious personnel and medical material.
b. “Medical transports” cover any means of transport, military or civilian, permanent or temporary, assigned exclusively to medical transportation and under the control of a competent authority of a Party to a conflict.
68. All means of medical transport, whether permanent or temporary, must be assigned exclusively to medical purposes in order to be entitled to protection. A convoy carrying both wounded and able-bodied soldiers or arms would lose the right to protection to the detriment of the wounded. (Note: the presence of light arms which have just been taken from the wounded and not yet turned over to the proper authority is permitted).
69. The term “respect” for the means of medical transport indicates that they may not be attacked or damaged, nor may their passage be obstructed. They must be permitted to carry out their assigned tasks. Medical transports by land and medical ships and craft must be respected and protected in the same way as mobile medical units. 
South Africa, Revised Civic Education Manual, South African National Defence Force, 2004, Chapter 4, §§ 67–69.