Related Rule
South Africa
Practice Relating to Rule 25. Medical Personnel
South Africa’s LOAC Manual (1996) provides:
Medical … personnel of the parties to a conflict, whether military or civilian, are to be respected and protected. This protection is not a personal privilege but rather a natural consequence of the rules designed to ensure respect and protection for the victims of armed conflict. Protection is accorded to medical personnel to facilitate the humanitarian tasks assigned to them; the protection is therefore limited to those circumstances in which they are carrying out these tasks exclusively.
The manual points to the distinction between permanent and auxiliary medical personnel and restates Articles 24–25 of the 1949 Geneva Convention I. 
South Africa, Presentation on the South African Approach to International Humanitarian Law, Appendix A, Chapter 4: International Humanitarian Law (The Law of Armed Conflict), National Defence Force, 1996, §§ 46–47.
South Africa’s Revised Civic Education Manual (2004) states:
62. Medical … Personnel. Medical … personnel of the parties to a conflict, whether military or civilian, are to be respected and protected. This protection is not a personal privilege but rather a natural consequence of the rules designed to ensure respect and protection for the victims of armed conflict. Protection is accorded to medical personnel to facilitate the humanitarian tasks assigned to them; the protection is therefore limited to those circumstances in which they are carrying out these tasks exclusively.
63. Two types of medical personnel are involved in military operations. They can be categorised as follows:
a. Those exclusively engaged in the search for, or the collection, transport or treatment of, wounded and sick, or employed in the prevention of disease. Staff engaged exclusively in the administration of medical units and establishments … shall be respected and protected in all circumstances.
b. Auxiliary medical personnel, specifically trained for employment, should the need arise, as hospital orderlies, nurses or auxiliary stretcher bearers, or in the search for or collection, transport or treatment of the wounded and sick, shall likewise be protected if they are carrying out these duties at the time when they come into contact with the enemy or fall into enemy hands. Auxiliary medical personnel are not protected when carrying out their normal military functions. 
South Africa, Revised Civic Education Manual, South African National Defence Force, 2004, Chapter 4, §§ 62–63.
South Africa’s LOAC Manual (1996) provides:
Medical personnel must abstain from all acts of hostility or they lose their protection. They are authorised to carry only light arms and have the right to use them only for their own defence or for that of the wounded or sick for whom they are responsible. 
South Africa, Presentation on the South African Approach to International Humanitarian Law, Appendix A, Chapter 4: International Humanitarian Law (The Law of Armed Conflict), National Defence Force, 1996, § 48. This manual is also included in Chapter 4 of the Draft Civic Education Manual of 1997.
South Africa’s Revised Civic Education Manual (2004) states:
Medical … personnel must abstain from all acts of hostility or they lose their protection. They are authorised to carry only light arms and have the right to use them only for their own defence or for that of the wounded and sick for whom they are responsible. 
South Africa, Revised Civic Education Manual, South African National Defence Force, 2004, Chapter 4, § 64.