Related Rule
South Africa
Practice Relating to Rule 153. Command Responsibility for Failure to Prevent, Punish or Report War Crimes
South Africa’s Medical Services Military Manual refers to Article 87 of the 1977 Additional Protocol I and provides: “Commanders will prevent [and] suppress and report breaches of humanitarian law.” 
South Africa, Medical Services Military Manual – Humanitarian Law, South African Medical Service Academy in Voortrekkerhoogte, s.d, p. 5.
South Africa’s LOAC Manual (1996) states:
All soldiers must be aware of their responsibility to report war crimes which are breaches of the LOAC. Normally the report should be made to the next superior in the chain of command. A report may also be made to the Military Police, a Legal Officer or a Chaplain. 
South Africa, Presentation on the South African Approach to International Humanitarian Law, Appendix A, Chapter 4: International Humanitarian Law (The Law of Armed Conflict), National Defence Force, 1996, § 43.
South Africa’s Revised Civic Education Manual (2004) states:
Every commander who is aware that subordinates or other persons under his/her control/command are going to commit or have committed a breach of the LOAC, are to initiate the necessary steps to prevent such a breach; and/or take the necessary disciplinary or penal action against those committing such a breach of the LOAC. 
South Africa, Revised Civic Education Manual, South African National Defence Force, 2004, Chapter 4, § 58 [the first of two consecutive sections designated as “58”]; see also § 93.
The manual also states:
All soldiers must be aware of their responsibility to report war crimes, which are breaches of the LOAC. Normally report should be made to the next senior in the chain of command. A report may also be made to the Military Police, a Legal Officer or a Chaplain. 
South Africa, Revised Civic Education Manual, South African National Defence Force, 2004, Chapter 4, § 58 [the second of two consecutive sections designated as “58”].