Related Rule
Uzbekistan
Practice Relating to Rule 143. Dissemination of International Humanitarian Law among the Civilian Population
In 2011, in its initial report to the Committee on the Rights of the Child under the Optional Protocol on the Involvement of Children in Armed Conflict, Uzbekistan stated:
It should be noted that the population of Uzbekistan has been informed about the provisions of the [2000 Optional] Protocol [to the Convention on the Rights of the Child on the Involvement of Children in Armed Conflict] thanks to an extensive information and education campaign based on the study of the [1989] Convention on the Rights of the Child (including art. 38), as well as within the context of educational activities in the field of international humanitarian law. 
Uzbekistan, Initial report to the Committee on the Rights of the Child under the Optional Protocol on the Involvement of Children in Armed Conflict, 26 January 2012, UN Doc. CRC/C/OPAC/UZB/1, submitted 24 January 2011, § 50.
In the report, Uzbekistan also stated:
After Uzbekistan acceded to the two [2000] Optional Protocols to the Convention on the Rights of the Child in 2010, a book in Uzbek entitled “The Optional Protocols to the Convention on the Rights of the Child” was published in an edition of 2,000 copies. The Protocols were also published in the book “The Legal Basis for the Protection of the Rights of the Child: International Standards and National Legislation” (1,000 copies). 
Uzbekistan, Initial report to the Committee on the Rights of the Child under the Optional Protocol on the Involvement of Children in Armed Conflict, 26 January 2012, UN Doc. CRC/C/OPAC/UZB/1, submitted 24 January 2011, § 54.
In the report, Uzbekistan further stated:
Inasmuch as the legislation of Uzbekistan is in complete conformity with the provisions of article 38 of the [1989] Convention on the Rights of the Child and its Optional Protocol on the involvement of children in armed conflict, it is planned to intensify informational/awareness-raising, educational and publishing activities in this field, improve the efficiency of the national system for monitoring observance of the rights of the child, including in matters covered by the Optional Protocol, and stimulate the social partnership between the State and civil society institutions in this sphere. 
Uzbekistan, Initial report to the Committee on the Rights of the Child under the Optional Protocol on the Involvement of Children in Armed Conflict, 26 January 2012, UN Doc. CRC/C/OPAC/UZB/1, submitted 24 January 2011, § 68.
In the report, Uzbekistan also stated:
186. Uzbekistan devotes considerable attention to informing the general public, civil servants, parliamentarians, judges, public prosecutors, internal affairs and defence department personnel, social workers, teachers and parents about the provisions of the [1989] Convention on the Rights of the Child and its [2000] Optional Protocol on the involvement of children in armed conflict.
187. The Protocol’s principles and provisions are widely covered by the national and regional mass media, studied in educational institutions, dealt with in the curricula of institutes and staff retraining and further training courses, published in the form of books, brochures, booklets and scholarly and popular articles in specialized children’s publications and feature on television and radio and in competitions and olympiads for schoolchildren and students of institutes of higher education. 
Uzbekistan, Initial report to the Committee on the Rights of the Child under the Optional Protocol on the Involvement of Children in Armed Conflict, 26 January 2012, UN Doc. CRC/C/OPAC/UZB/1, submitted 24 January 2011, §§ 186–187.
In the report, Uzbekistan further stated:
193. The curriculum for students in the law faculty of the Mirzo Ulugbek National University of Uzbekistan includes such courses as “Human Rights” (54 hours) and “International Law” (81 hours). These courses explore in detail questions relating to the involvement of children in armed conflict. Law and philosophy students following the course on the Idea of National Independence and Foundations of Spirituality and Law are conversant with the [2000] Protocol to the Convention on the Rights of the Child on the involvement of children in armed conflict. Moreover, law students are informed about the offence of recruiting children and involving them in hostilities during their lectures on criminal law.
195. Meetings, seminars, and training sessions on issues pertaining to the involvement of children in armed conflict are regularly held in the Law Faculty of the Mirzo Ulugbek National University. These events are organized by the “Theory of the State and Law and International Law” sub-faculty.
196. By organizing higher-level courses, the Office of the Procurator-General takes steps to disseminate the contents of the Optional [Protocol] to the Convention on the Rights of the Child on the involvement of children in armed conflict … and to educate employees of the prosecution service in the basic standards laid down in these international instruments. In particular, in 2010, in the Republican Centre for the Social Adaptation of Children, a seminar cum training session was held on the theme: Questions relating to the Prevention of Criminal Offences against Children. At the training session the problems of safeguarding the rights and freedoms of children were discussed. Proposals were made, including with respect to the development of measures to prevent criminal offences against children in accordance with the Optional Protocol to the Convention on the Rights of the Child on the involvement of children in armed conflict.
197. The TGYuI [Tashkent State Law Institute] has published a textbook entitled International Humanitarian Law. One of the important topics dealt with in this textbook is the problem of protecting the rights of the child in situations of armed conflict. Accordingly, special attention is paid to explaining the rights and freedoms of children, who under the rules of humanitarian law are included in the “protected persons” group.
198. The specific facts relating to the forced recruitment of minors into the armed forces … are described in the textbook from the standpoint of the pernicious consequences of the involvement of children in hostilities.
200. In connection with the introduction into the curriculum of the institutes of higher legal education of a new course on the rights of the child, the TGYuI is currently in the process of preparing a textbook with the same title, one chapter (chap. 5) of which is directly devoted to the “Protection of the Rights of the Child within the Framework of International Humanitarian Law”. Section 3 of this chapter is devoted to an analysis of the Optional Protocols to the Convention on the Rights of the Child. The attention of students is particularly drawn to the key provisions of humanitarian law concerning the age threshold for the recruitment of children into the armed forces, the variable approach of States to the question of the mobilization of children on the basis of their having attained their majority, and their deliberate turning of juveniles into soldiers.
201. Within the context of the implementation of the provisions of the Optional Protocol to the Convention on the Rights of the Child on the involvement of children in armed conflict, the bachelor’s programme of the University of World Economy and Diplomacy of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs offers, as part of its “Human Rights” course, instruction in such subjects as the concept and significance of the rights of the child, the international agreements and national legislation of Uzbekistan on the protection of the rights of the child, international and national institutional mechanisms for protecting the rights of the child and aspects of Uzbekistan’s international cooperation in the area of protection and observance of child rights. The course on “Fundamentals of International Humanitarian Law” includes instruction in the principles of international law governing the protection of the rights of the child during periods of armed conflict, while students following the course on criminal law study issues relating to criminal liability for violation of the laws and customs of war.
202. At master’s degree level, under the specialty “International Law” within the framework of the course on “International Human Rights Law”, the following topics are studied: the protection of the rights of the child in international law; the substance and significance of the Protocol; international monitoring mechanisms; procedures for protecting the rights of the child; and matters relating to the implementation of the provisions of the Protocol in the national legislation. At the same time, the course on “International Humanitarian Law” covers contemporary problems of international humanitarian law and theoretical and practical problems relating to the protection of the rights of the child during periods of armed conflict. Students of international humanitarian law take part in such international competitions as the Central Asian competition between student teams of the institutes of higher education of the Republics of Central Asia and the Jean-Pictet international competition, in which student teams from all over the world participate. In the International Law Faculty degree work is done and master’s theses are written on subjects relating to the protection of the rights of the child and international humanitarian law.
203. The Advanced Training Centre for Jurists attached to the Ministry of Justice takes measures to raise students’ awareness of the role and significance of the Optional Protocol to the Convention on the Rights of the Child on the involvement of children in armed conflict.
204. The training programmes for district (municipal) criminal court judges and for military judges include as a special subject the observance of human rights and freedoms in the course of armed conflicts.
205. The Centre’s curriculum includes courses on: “The Rights of the Child: International Standards and National Legislations”; “The Legal Basis for the Fight against International Crime”; and “The Place and Role of International Standards on the Protection of Human Rights in the Activities of Law Enforcement Agencies”.
206. Within the context of these courses, students are informed about the requirements of the Optional Protocol to the Convention on the Rights of the Child on the involvement of children in armed conflict, the obligations of States in this respect, and the legal, administrative and other measures that need to be introduced by countries to ensure that the obligations assumed are actually fulfilled. 
Uzbekistan, Initial report to the Committee on the Rights of the Child under the Optional Protocol on the Involvement of Children in Armed Conflict, 26 January 2012, UN Doc. CRC/C/OPAC/UZB/1, submitted 24 January 2011, §§ 193, 195–198 and 200–206.
In the report, Uzbekistan also stated:
Uzbekistan will continue to work together with the ICRC and other international organizations with a view to keeping the population and State employees … informed about issues relating to international humanitarian law and the study of the Convention of the Rights of the Child and its Optional Protocol on the involvement of children in armed conflict. 
Uzbekistan, Initial report to the Committee on the Rights of the Child under the Optional Protocol on the Involvement of Children in Armed Conflict, 26 January 2012, UN Doc. CRC/C/OPAC/UZB/1, submitted 24 January 2011, § 238.