Related Rule
Uzbekistan
Practice Relating to Rule 136. Recruitment of Child Soldiers
Uzbekistan’s Universal Military Duty and Military Service Act (2002) states:
In peacetime, able-bodied male citizens aged between 18 and 27 may be called up for fixed-term military service as privates or sergeants or for service in the mobilization call-up reserve. 
Uzbekistan, Universal Military Duty and Military Service Act, 2002, Article 4.
The Act also states:
When mobilization is declared and in wartime, persons liable for military duty or conscription aged between 18 and the age limit for service in the reserves laid down by the Act, together with women aged between 18 and 45 years not on the military register … may be called up for military service. 
Uzbekistan, Universal Military Duty and Military Service Act, 2002, Article 46.
In 2010, in its combined third and fourth periodic reports to the Committee on the Rights of the Child, Uzbekistan stated:
The definition of the child in article 3 of the [2008 Rights of the Child (Safeguards)] Act fully coincides with the one provided in article 1 of the [1989] Convention [on the Rights of the Child], namely every human being below the age of 18 unless, under the law applicable to the child, majority is attained earlier. 
Uzbekistan, Combined third and fourth periodic reports to the Committee on the Rights of the Child, 26 January 2012, UN Doc. CRC/C/UZB/3-4, submitted 22 February 2010, § 310.
In the report, Uzbekistan also stated:
919. Since every child has an inalienable right to life and health care, Uzbekistan opposes children’s participation in armed conflicts and their recruitment for military service.
920. Under the Universal Military Duty and Military Service Act of 12 December 2002, military service is a specific form of public service through which Uzbek citizens fulfil the universal duty in question.
921. The following types of military service are provided for:
• Fixed-term military service
• Military service subsequent to mobilization of draft-age reserves
• Voluntary enlistment
• Enlistment of reservists having completed their military service.
922. In peacetime, physically qualified male citizens aged 18–20 are subject to the first two types of military service.
932. In order to ensure full implementation of article 38 of the Convention, Uzbekistan, on 12 December 2008, in the Year of Young Persons and the Year of the sixtieth anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, ratified the Optional Protocol to the Convention on the Rights of the Child on the involvement of children in armed conflicts[.]” 
Uzbekistan, Combined third and fourth periodic reports to the Committee on the Rights of the Child, 26 January 2012, UN Doc. CRC/C/UZB/3-4, submitted 22 February 2010, §§ 919–922 and 932.
In 2011, in its initial report to the Committee on the Rights of the Child under the Optional Protocol on the Involvement of Children in Armed Conflict, Uzbekistan stated:
Uzbekistan opposes the recruitment and use of children in armed conflicts in violation of the rules of international law and has established criminal liability for genocide, crimes against humanity and war crimes with a view to safeguarding the life, health and welfare of children and protecting their interests. 
Uzbekistan, Initial report to the Committee on the Rights of the Child under the Optional Protocol on the Involvement of Children in Armed Conflict, 26 January 2012, UN Doc. CRC/C/OPAC/UZB/1, submitted 24 January 2011, § 12.
In the report, Uzbekistan also stated:
26. Uzbekistan acceded to the Optional Protocol to the Convention on the Rights of the Child on the involvement of children in armed conflict on 12 December 2008, the year that marked the sixtieth anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. The Optional Protocol entered into force in the territory of Uzbekistan on 23 January 2009.
68. Inasmuch as the legislation of Uzbekistan is in complete conformity with the provisions of article 38 of the [1989] Convention on the Rights of the Child and its [2000] Optional Protocol on the involvement of children in armed conflict, it is planned to … improve the efficiency of the national system for monitoring observance of the rights of the child, including in matters covered by the Optional Protocol.
Article 1
74. Never in the history of Uzbekistan has it been the practice to recruit for military service persons who have not attained the age of 18.
75. The constitutional duty of citizens to defend Uzbekistan and to perform military or alternative service does not become effective until they reach the age of 18 (art. 52).
76. In accordance with the Act on the accession of Uzbekistan to the Optional Protocol to the Convention on the Rights of the Child on the involvement of children in armed conflict (New York, 25 May 2000), on acceding to the Optional Protocol Uzbekistan made the following statement: “The Republic of Uzbekistan states that under the Universal Military Duty and Military Service Act of the Republic of Uzbekistan of 12 December 2002, citizens may be called up to serve in the Armed Forces of Uzbekistan only from the age of 18.”
Article 2
77. Uzbekistan takes legislative, administrative, informational, educational and other measures to preclude the compulsory call-up for service in the Armed Forces of persons who have not attained the age of 18.
84. In peacetime, able-bodied male citizens aged between 18 and 27 may be called up for fixed-term military service as privates or sergeants or for service in the mobilization call-up reserve.
85. When mobilization is declared and in wartime, persons liable for military duty or conscription aged between 18 and the age limit for service in the reserves laid down by the Act, together with women aged between 18 and 45 years not on the military register (apart from those with children under 16), may be called up for military service. 
Uzbekistan, Initial report to the Committee on the Rights of the Child under the Optional Protocol on the Involvement of Children in Armed Conflict, 26 January 2012, UN Doc. CRC/C/OPAC/UZB/1, submitted 24 January 2011, §§ 26, 68, 74–77 and 84–85.
In the report, Uzbekistan further stated: “The legislation of Uzbekistan does not provide for the voluntary recruitment for military service of persons under 18.” 
Uzbekistan, Initial report to the Committee on the Rights of the Child under the Optional Protocol on the Involvement of Children in Armed Conflict, 26 January 2012, UN Doc. CRC/C/OPAC/UZB/1, submitted 24 January 2011, § 149.