Related Rule
United States of America
Practice Relating to Rule 142. Instruction in International Humanitarian Law within Armed Forces
Section B. Obligation of commanders to instruct the armed forces under their command
The US Instructor’s Guide (1985) states that, as a commander, “you must ensure your troops receive instruction in the law of war. You should ensure that they know and follow the applicable rules of engagement.” 
United States, Instructor’s Guide – The Law of War, Headquarters Department of the Army, Washington, April 1985, p. 19.
The US Naval Handbook (1995) provides: “Officers in command of operational units are encouraged to utilize this publication as a training aid for assigned personnel.” 
United States, The Commander’s Handbook on the Law of Naval Operations, NWP 1-14M/MCWP 5-2.1/COMDTPUB P5800.7, issued by the Department of the Navy, Office of the Chief of Naval Operations and Headquarters, US Marine Corps, and Department of Transportation, US Coast Guard, October 1995 (formerly NWP 9 (Rev. A)/FMFM 1-10, October 1989), Preface, p. 21
The US Naval Handbook (2007) states: “Officers in command of operational units are encouraged to utilize this publication as a training aid for assigned personnel.” 
United States, The Commander’s Handbook on the Law of Naval Operations, NWP 1-14M/MCWP 5-12.1/COMDTPUB P5800.7, issued by the Department of the Navy, Office of the Chief of Naval Operations and Headquarters, US Marine Corps, and Department of Homeland Security, US Coast Guard, July 2007, p. 19.
The US Manual on Detainee Operations (2008) states:
When U.S. forces conduct detainee operations governed by the [1949] Geneva Conventions, they must possess the text of the applicable conventions and be specially instructed as to their provisions … Pursuant to this obligation, JFCs [joint force commanders] are responsible to ensure … related training to enhance compliance with applicable law and policy. 
United States, Manual on Detainee Operations, Joint Chiefs of Staff, 30 May 2008, p. x.
The manual also states:
The DFC [Detention Facility Commander] is the commander responsible for the execution of all detention facility operations … A DFC’s responsibilities normally include the following:
f. Ensuring that all personnel are properly trained on the rules for use of force (RUF), the law of land warfare, including the [1949] Geneva Conventions and all other applicable laws and policies, and that all personnel have an effective knowledge of the detention facility standard operating procedure (SOP). 
United States, Manual on Detainee Operations, Joint Chiefs of Staff, 30 May 2008, pp. II-4–II-5.
The 1979 version of the US Department of Defense (DoD) Directive on the Law of War Program provided:
The Secretaries of the Military Departments shall develop internal policies and procedures consistent with this Directive in support of the DoD law of war program in order to:
(1) Provide publications, instructions, and training so that the principles and rules of the law of war will be known to members of their respective Departments, the extent of such knowledge to be commensurate with each individual’s duties and responsibilities. 
United States, Department of Defense Directive on the Law of War Program No. 5100.77, 10 July 1979, Section E(2)(e)(1).
In 1991, in response to an ICRC memorandum on the applicability of IHL in the Gulf region, the US Department of the Army stated: “[IHL] training is a command responsibility.” 
United States, Letter from the Department of the Army to the legal adviser of the US Army deployed in the Gulf region, 11 January 1991, § 8(S), Report on US Practice, 1997, Chapter 6.6.
The 1998 version of the US Department of Defense Directive on the Law of War Program provided that the Secretaries of the Military Departments shall “provide directives, publications, instructions, and training so that the principles and rules of the law of war will be known to members of their respective Departments, the extent of such knowledge to be commensurate with each individual’s duties and responsibilities”. Furthermore, they shall “ensure that programs are implemented in their respective Military Departments to prevent violations of the law of war, emphasizing any types of violations that have been reported”. 
United States, Department of Defense Directive on the Law of War Program No. 5100.77, 9 December 1998, Sections 5(5)(1) and (2).
In May 2004, Major General Antonio M. Taguba completed his report of an investigation, ordered by the Commander Coalition Forces Land Component Command, into allegations of detainee abuse and maltreatment by members of the 800th Military Police Brigade at Abu Ghraib Prison (Baghdad Central Confinement Facility (BCCF)).The report stated:
I find that there was no clear emphasis by BG Karpinski [Commander of the 800th MP Brigade] to ensure that the 800th MP Brigade Staff, Commanders, and Soldiers were trained to standard in detainee operations and proficiency or that serious accountability lapses that occurred over a significant period of time, particularly at Abu Ghraib (BCCF), were corrected … Following the abuse of several detainees at Camp Bucca in May 2003, I could find no evidence that BG Karpinski ever directed corrective training for her soldiers or ensured that MP Soldiers throughout Iraq clearly understood the requirements of the Geneva Conventions relating to the treatment of detainees.
General Taguba’s recommendations included:
That BG Janis L. Karpinski, Commander, 800th MP Brigade, be Relieved from Command and given a General Officer Memorandum of Reprimand for the following acts which have been previously referred to in the aforementioned findings [including]:
•Failing to ensure that MP Soldiers in the 800th MP Brigade knew, understood, and adhered to the protections afforded to detainees in the Geneva Convention Relative to the Treatment of Prisoners of War.
That COL Thomas M. Pappas, Commander, 205th MI Brigade, be given a General Officer Memorandum of Reprimand and Investigated UP Procedure 15, AR 381-10, US Army Intelligence Activities for the following acts which have been previously referred to in the aforementioned findings [including]:
•Failing to ensure that Soldiers under his direct command knew, understood, and followed the protections afforded to detainees in the Geneva Convention Relative to the Treatment of Prisoners of War.
That LTC (P) Jerry L. Phillabaum, Commander, 320th MP Battalion, be Relieved from Command, be given a General Officer Memorandum of Reprimand, and be removed from the Colonel/O-6 Promotion List for the following acts which have been previously referred to in the aforementioned findings [including]:
•Failing to ensure that Soldiers under his direct command knew and understood the protections afforded to detainees in the Geneva Convention Relative to the Treatment of Prisoners of War.
That LTC Steven L. Jordan, Former Director, Joint Interrogation and Debriefing Center and Liaison Officer to 205th Military Intelligence Brigade, be relieved from duty and be given a General Officer Memorandum of Reprimand for the following acts which have been previously referred to in the aforementioned findings [including]:
•Failing to ensure that Soldiers under his direct control knew, understood, and followed the protections afforded to detainees in the Geneva Convention Relative to the Treatment of Prisoners of War. 
United States, Department of Defense, Commander Coalition Forces Land Component Command, Investigation of the 800th Military Police Brigade (Taguba Report), May 2004.