Related Rule
Ukraine
Practice Relating to Rule 99. Deprivation of Liberty
Ukraine’s IHL Manual (2004) states: “Serious violations of international humanitarian law directed against people include: … unlawful confinement (detention)”. 
Ukraine, Manual on the Application of IHL Rules, Ministry of Defence, 11 September 2004, § 1.8.5.
In 1999, in its sixth periodic report to the Human Rights Committee, Ukraine stated:
72. In article 64, paragraph 2, the Constitution lists those rights and freedoms which may not be restricted under martial law or a state of emergency.
73. These rights and freedoms include, among others, the following:
- Every person has the right to freedom and personal inviolability. 
Ukraine, Sixth periodic report to the Human Rights Committee, 11 April 2006, UN Doc. CCPR/C/UKR/6, submitted 3 November 1999, §§ 72–73.
In 1999, in its sixth periodic report to the Human Rights Committee, Ukraine stated:
72. In article 64, paragraph 2, the Constitution lists those rights and freedoms which may not be restricted under martial law or a state of emergency.
73. These rights and freedoms include, among others, the following:
- No one may be arrested or remanded in custody other than pursuant to a court decision … and only … in accordance with the procedure established by law. 
Ukraine, Sixth periodic report to the Human Rights Committee, 11 April 2006, UN Doc. CCPR/C/UKR/6, submitted 3 November 1999, §§ 72–73.
In 1999, in its sixth periodic report to the Human Rights Committee, Ukraine stated:
72. In article 64, paragraph 2, the Constitution lists those rights and freedoms which may not be restricted under martial law or a state of emergency.
73. These rights and freedoms include, among others, the following:
- No one may be arrested or remanded in custody other than pursuant to a court decision with grounds stated. 
Ukraine, Sixth periodic report to the Human Rights Committee, 11 April 2006, UN Doc. CCPR/C/UKR/6, submitted 3 November 1999, §§ 72–73.