Related Rule
Solomon Islands
Practice Relating to Rule 71. Weapons That Are by Nature Indiscriminate
In its written statement submitted to the ICJ in the Nuclear Weapons (WHO) case in 1994, Solomon Islands stated:
Since [their qualitative] effects may affect people outside the scope of conflict, both in time and geographically, the use of nuclear weapons violates the prohibition on the use of weapons which … cause harm to civilians and have indiscriminate effects. 
Solomon Islands, Written statement submitted to the ICJ, Nuclear Weapons (WHO) case, 10 June 1994, p. 75, § 3.94.
In its written statement submitted to the ICJ in the Nuclear Weapons case in 1995, Solomon Islands referred to:
The customary rule which states that belligerents must always distinguish between combatants and non-combatants and limit their attack only to the former. This is an old and well-established rule which has achieved universal acceptance. The first multilateral instrument to state it was the St. Petersburg Declaration of 1868 … This obligation is repeated and further elaborated in different forms in many instruments. 
Solomon Islands, Written statement submitted to the ICJ, Nuclear Weapons case, 19 June 1995, p. 46, § 3.47.
Solomon Islands further referred to:
Those rules of the international law of armed conflict which prohibit:
-the use of weapons that render death inevitable;
-the use of weapons which have indiscriminate effects;
-any behaviour which might violate this law. 
Solomon Islands, Written statement submitted to the ICJ, Nuclear Weapons case, 19 June 1995, p. 55, § 3.63.