Related Rule
Russian Federation
Practice Relating to Rule 90. Torture and Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment
Section A. General
The Russian Federation’s Military Manual (1990) states that prohibited methods of warfare include “torture aimed at obtaining information of any kind”. 
Russian Federation, Instructions on the Application of the Rules of International Humanitarian Law by the Armed Forces of the USSR, Appendix to Order of the USSR Defence Minister No. 75, 1990, § 5(b).
The manual further prohibits the torture and cruel treatment of victims of war, namely the wounded, sick and shipwrecked, prisoners of war and the civilian population. 
Russian Federation, Instructions on the Application of the Rules of International Humanitarian Law by the Armed Forces of the USSR, Appendix to Order of the USSR Defence Minister No. 75, 1990, § 8(a).
The Russian Federation’s Regulations on the Application of IHL (2001) states:
Under any circumstances international humanitarian law ensures humane treatment during an armed conflict of persons not directly involved in combat operations … In particular, the following shall be prohibited with regard to such persons:
- violence to life and person, including murder of any kind, mutilation, cruel treatment, torture and torment;
- outrages upon personal dignity, in particular humiliating and degrading treatment;
..
- threats to commit any of the above acts. 
Russian Federation, Regulations on the Application of International Humanitarian Law by the Armed Forces of the Russian Federation, Ministry of Defence of the Russian Federation, Moscow, 8 August 2001, § 4.
With regard to prisoners of war, the Regulations states: “Prisoners of war shall be questioned in the language they understand, no torture or any other pressure may be used.” 
Russian Federation, Regulations on the Application of International Humanitarian Law by the Armed Forces of the Russian Federation, Ministry of Defence of the Russian Federation, Moscow, 8 August 2001, § 51.
With regard to internal armed conflict, the Regulations states:
The following acts against [all persons who do not take a direct part or who have ceased to take part in hostilities] are and shall remain prohibited at any time and in any place whatsoever: … violence to the life, health and physical or mental well-being of persons, in particular murder as well as cruel treatment such as torture, mutilation or any form of corporal punishment; …outrages upon personal dignity, in particular humiliating and degrading treatment, rape, enforced prostitution and any form of indecent assault [and] threats to commit any of the foregoing acts. 
Russian Federation, Regulations on the Application of International Humanitarian Law by the Armed Forces of the Russian Federation, Ministry of Defence of the Russian Federation, Moscow, 8 August 2001, § 81.
Under the Russian Federation’s Criminal Code (1996), the cruel treatment of civilians or prisoners of war is a “crime against the peace and security of mankind”. 
Russian Federation, Criminal Code, 1996, Article 356(1); see also Article 357 (causing injuries as part of a genocide campaign).
In 2008, in a statement before the UN Security Council on the protection of civilians in armed conflict, the permanent representative of the Russian Federation stated: “The use of children in conflict is inadmissible, as is inhuman treatment of them.” 
Russian Federation, Statement by the permanent representative of the Russian Federation at a UN Security Council meeting on the protection of civilians in armed conflict, 5898th meeting, 27 May 2008.
In 2009, in its written reply to the Human Rights Committee concerning the list of issues raised in connection with its sixth periodic report, the Russian Federation stated:
At the present moment, in accordance with the legislation of the Russian Federation, public officials, including police officers, military servicemen and members of the security services, may be subject to prosecution for acts of torture and cruel treatment in accordance with Articles 302 (coercion to obtain testimony) and 117 (torture) of the Criminal Code. The perpetrator of the offence under Article 303 is any person who orders, or is responsible for, the above acts, as well as any other person acting with the consent or acquiescence of the above persons. 
Russian Federation, Written replies by the Government of the Russian Federation to the Human Rights Committee concerning the list of issues raised in connection with the sixth periodic report of the Russian Federation, 24 August 2009, UN Doc. CCPR/C/RUS/Q/6/Add.1, submitted 7 August 2009.
4. … Once ratified, treaties and conventions all are integrated into domestic law. According to the Constitution (Articles 189 and 190), ratified treaties have supremacy over organic and national laws. …
122. Torture and other ill treatment is currently an issue and has been for a very long time, to citizens of all nations. Hence, the international community is determined to eradicate this evil by the adoption of the Convention against Torture and Other Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment. Rwanda acceded to this philosophy by the ratification of the Convention. 
Rwanda, Initial report to the Committee against Torture, 16 June 2011, UN Doc. CAT/C/RWA/1, submitted 8 April 2011, §§ 4, 11, 19, 27–28, 33, 43–44, 70, 99, 101, 118 and 122.
[footnotes in original omitted]