Related Rule
New Zealand
Practice Relating to Rule 159. Amnesty
New Zealand’s Military Manual (1992) provides with respect to non-international armed conflicts:
In order to facilitate a return to peaceful conditions, the authorities in power at the end of the hostilities are to endeavour to grant the broadest possible amnesty to those who have participated in the conflict or been deprived of their liberty for reasons related to it, whether they were interned or detained …
This terminology is used to apply to whichever Party is in power at the end of the conflict, whether it be the former government or its opponents …
This would seem to include persons tried for treason, but not those sentenced for common crimes, including assassination. 
New Zealand, Interim Law of Armed Conflict Manual, DM 112, New Zealand Defence Force, Headquarters, Directorate of Legal Services, Wellington, November 1992, § 1816, including footnotes 55 and 56.
New Zealand’s Military Manual (1992) provides with respect to non-international armed conflicts:
In order to facilitate a return to peaceful conditions, the authorities in power at the end of the hostilities are to endeavour to grant the broadest possible amnesty to those who have participated in the conflict or been deprived of their liberty for reasons related to it, whether they were interned or detained …
This terminology is used to apply to whichever Party is in power at the end of the conflict, whether it be the former government or its opponents …
This would seem to include persons tried for treason, but not those sentenced for common crimes, including assassination. 
New Zealand, Interim Law of Armed Conflict Manual, DM 112, New Zealand Defence Force, Headquarters, Directorate of Legal Services, Wellington, November 1992, § 1816, including footnotes 55 and 56.