New Zealand
Practice Relating to Nuclear Weapons
In 1996, during a debate in the First Committee of the UN General Assembly, New Zealand stated:
The NPT [Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty] principles and objectives for nuclear, non-proliferation and disarmament also signalled the desire of many States to see security assurances by the nuclear weapon States given the form of a legally binding instrument. The importance many, including New Zealand, attach to such a legal commitment has been underscored in the past year by the progress made in establishing nuclear-weapon- free zones … Taken together, the four nuclear-weapon-free zone Treaties represent the aspirations of nearly two thirds of the membership of this Assembly to be free of nuclear weapons. New Zealand, like a number of other countries party to a nuclear-weapon-free zone treaty, would like to build on that common objective. We have, accordingly, cosponsored a resolution urging further cooperation between zone members to consolidate efforts that have made over half the world, including most of the southern hemisphere, nuclear free. We take this opportunity to thank Brazil for leading on this initiative and commend the text to the representatives to this Committee. 
New Zealand, Statement before the First Committee of the UN General Assembly, UN Doc. A/C.1/51/PV.8, 18 October 1996, p. 3.
In 1996, during a debate in the First Committee of the UN General Assembly, New Zealand stated:
As the New Zealand Minister of State said in his general debate address last September:
“New Zealand believes that in 1997 all States, including nuclear-weapon States, should pursue negotiations on a phased programme of nuclear disarmament, with the ultimate goals of the complete elimination of nuclear weapons and a treaty on general and complete disarmament under strict and effective international control.”(Official Records of the General Assembly, Fifty-first Session, Plenary Meetings, 13th meeting, p. 2). 
New Zealand, Statement before the First Committee of the UN General Assembly, UN Doc. A/C.1/51/PV.22, 14 November 1996, p. 8.
In 2009, in a statement before the Sixth Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Article XIV Conference, the Minister of Foreign Affairs of New Zealand stated:
We strongly support the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty [CTBT] as an important milestone along the path to a world free of nuclear weapons.
The CTBT has a vital place in today’s multilateral framework for nuclear disarmament and non-proliferation. It already contributes to global stability. Its entry into force would be a major step towards a world free of nuclear weapons – which must be our ultimate destination. 
New Zealand, Statement by the Minister of Foreign Affairs at the Sixth Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Article XIV Conference, New York, 24 September 2009.
In 2009, in a statement before the First Committee of the UN General Assembly, the Ambassador for Disarmament of New Zealand stated:
The CTBT [Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty] has a vital place in today’s multilateral framework for nuclear disarmament and non-proliferation, with a strong contribution to make to global security. Its entry into force would be a major step toward a world free of nuclear weapons …
I would like to take this opportunity to introduce our resolution on a nuclear-weapon-free southern hemisphere, which is put forward jointly by Brazil and New Zealand. The resolution has been adopted by an overwhelming majority in past years and we look forward to an even stronger outcome this year.
We welcome the entry into force earlier this year of the Treaty of Pelindaba and note that the entire network of nuclear-weapon-free zone treaties which span the southern hemisphere is now in force.
Nuclear-weapon-free zones are a powerful demonstration of the strong collective will that exists at a regional level to rid the world of nuclear weapons. In this connection, we are cognisant of the fact that nuclear-weapon-free zones contribute strongly to both nuclear disarmament and nuclear non-proliferation objectives. 
New Zealand, Statement by the Ambassador for Disarmament before the First Committee of the UN General Assembly, 14 October 2009.
In 2010, in a statement before the Review Conference of the Parties to the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons, the Ambassador for Disarmament of New Zealand stated:
New Zealand continues to be a strong advocate for greater progress towards the achievement of a world free of nuclear weapons ….
A diminishing role for nuclear weapons in security strategies should be our guiding principle. …
The entry into force of the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty would represent a very significant milestone towards the goal of a world free of nuclear weapons. New Zealand continues to call on all States that have not yet done so to ratify the Treaty without any further delay. 
New Zealand, Statement by the Ambassador for Disarmament at the Review Conference of the Parties to the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons, 11 May 2010.
In 2010, in a statement on behalf of New Zealand and Australia before the Review Conference of the Parties to the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT), the Ambassador for Disarmament of New Zealand stated:
It is my honour on behalf of Australia and New Zealand to introduce a proposal for systematic reporting on the implementation of Article VI commitments, often described as “transparency”. …
Our proposal on reporting has a clear rationale and a practical purpose. The fundamental objective of transparency is the building of confidence through practices that demonstrate the accountability of NPT States Parties and underpin the credibility of the Treaty regime.
In the words of the opening preambular paragraphs of the Treaty, we need to have confidence in each other to ensure that nuclear weapons will never be used again. We need to have confidence in each other to prevent the wider dissemination of nuclear weapons.
Key to building this confidence, we believe, is increased reporting by the nuclear-weapon States of progressive efforts to eliminate nuclear weapons from their national arsenals and the means of their delivery. Reporting by all states parties would provide further evidence of our shared commitment to a world free of nuclear weapons.
The proposal also calls on non-nuclear weapon states to report on their efforts to bring about nuclear disarmament, including with respect to the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty and a treaty banning the production of fissile material for nuclear weapons. 
New Zealand, Statement on behalf of Australia and New Zealand by New Zealand’s Ambassador for Disarmament at the Review Conference of the Parties to the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons, 12 May 2010.
In 2010, in a statement before the First Committee of the UN General Assembly, the Ambassador for Disarmament of New Zealand stated:
We were pleased that the NPT [Non-Proliferation Treaty] Review Conference reinforced the CTBT [Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty] as a vital step on the road to the elimination of nuclear weapons. …
The NPT Review Conference’s recognition of the catastrophic humanitarian consequences that would result from any use of nuclear weapons should further reinforce the need for all states to take urgent steps towards their elimination. New Zealand welcomes all efforts towards this goal. 
New Zealand, Statement by the Ambassador for Disarmament before the First Committee of the UN General Assembly, 14 October 2010.