Related Rule
Netherlands
Practice Relating to Rule 93. Rape and Other Forms of Sexual Violence
The Military Manual (1993) of the Netherlands restates the prohibition of sexual violence found in common Article 3 to the 1949 Geneva Conventions, Articles 75–77 of the 1977 Additional Protocol I and Article 4 of the 1977 Additional Protocol II. 
Netherlands, Toepassing Humanitair Oorlogsrecht, Voorschift No. 27-412/1, Koninklijke Landmacht, Ministerie van Defensie, 1993, pp. VIII-3, XI-1 and XI-4.
The Military Manual (2005) of the Netherlands states that “women should be protected from rape and other sexual violence”. 
Netherlands, Humanitair Oorlogsrecht: Handleiding, Voorschift No. 27-412, Koninklijke Landmacht, Militair Juridische Dienst, 2005, § 0719.
The manual refers to “rape, forced prostitution and any form of indecent assault” as acts that “are, and remain, prohibited at all times”. 
Netherlands, Humanitair Oorlogsrecht: Handleiding, Voorschift No. 27-412, Koninklijke Landmacht, Militair Juridische Dienst, 2005, § 0810.
(emphasis in original)
In its chapter on non-international armed conflict, the manual states:
1051. It is expressly prohibited to carry out the following acts against the civilian population or individual civilians, wounded, sick or prisoners:
- outrages upon personal dignity, especially humiliating and degrading treatment, rape, forced prostitution, sterilization and indecent assault;
- threatening anyone with the above-mentioned acts or treatment.
1062. Any indecent assault on women is prohibited, especially rape, forced pregnancy with a view to influencing the ethnic composition of the population, or committing any other international offence, forced prostitution or any other form of sexual violence. 
Netherlands, Humanitair Oorlogsrecht: Handleiding, Voorschift No. 27-412, Koninklijke Landmacht, Militair Juridische Dienst, 2005, §§ 1051 and 1062.
The Definition of War Crimes Decree (1946) of the Netherlands includes “rape” and “abduction of girls and women for the purpose of enforced prostitution” in its list of war crimes. 
Netherlands, Definition of War Crimes Decree, 1946, Article 1.
Under the International Crimes Act (2003) of the Netherlands, “rape, sexual slavery, enforced prostitution, enforced sterilization, or any other form of sexual violence which can be deemed to be of a gravity comparable to a grave breach of the Geneva Conventions”, “forced pregnancy”, as well as “outrages upon personal dignity, in particular humiliating and degrading treatment” of persons taking no active part in the hostilities, constitute crimes, whether committed in time of international or non-international armed conflict. 
Netherlands, International Crimes Act, 2003, Articles 5(3)(a) and (b), 5(5)(j), 6(1)(c) and 6(2)(a) and (b); see also Article 3(1)(d) (imposition of measures intended to prevent births within a group as part of a genocide campaign) and Article 4(1)(g) (rape, sexual slavery, enforced prostitution, forced pregnancy, enforced sterilisation, or any other form of sexual violence of comparable gravity as crimes against humanity).
In a letter to parliament in 1993, the Minister of Foreign Affairs of the Netherlands condemned the maltreatment and rape of women in the former Yugoslavia. 
Netherlands, Lower House of Parliament, Letter from the Minister of Foreign Affairs concerning the situation in Yugoslavia, 1992–1993 Session, Doc. 22 181, No. 36, 25 February 1993, p. 1.