Related Rule
Netherlands
Practice Relating to Rule 113. Treatment of the Dead
The Military Manual (1993) of the Netherlands states: “Remains must be protected.” 
Netherlands, Toepassing Humanitair Oorlogsrecht, Voorschift No. 27-412/1, Koninklijke Landmacht, Ministerie van Defensie, 1993, p. VI-2
The Military Handbook (1995) of the Netherlands provides: “The dead must not be mutilated.” 
Netherlands, Handboek Militair, Ministerie van Defensie, 1995, p. 7-37.
The Military Manual (2005) of the Netherlands states:
The individual is entitled to respect for his life, physical, mental and moral integrity and whatever is inseparable from his personality.
Examples:
- The physical remains of a fallen combatant are inviolable. 
Netherlands, Humanitair Oorlogsrecht: Handleiding, Voorschift No. 27-412, Koninklijke Landmacht, Militair Juridische Dienst, 2005, § 0224(d).
The manual further states: “Human remains must be respected and protected.” 
Netherlands, Humanitair Oorlogsrecht: Handleiding, Voorschift No. 27-412, Koninklijke Landmacht, Militair Juridische Dienst, 2005, § 0609.
The Military Criminal Code (1964), as amended in 1990, of the Netherlands provides for the punishment of persons committing violent acts against a dead person. 
Netherlands, Military Criminal Code, as amended in 1990, Article 143.
The Military Handbook (1995) of the Netherlands provides: “The property [of the dead] must not be taken or destroyed.” 
Netherlands, Handboek Militair, Ministerie van Defensie, 1995, p. 7-37.
Under the Military Criminal Code (1964), as amended in 1990, of the Netherlands, “theft from a dead … person, who belongs to one of the parties to the conflict” is a criminal offence. 
Netherlands, Military Criminal Code, 1964, as amended in 1990, Article 156.