Related Rule
Mexico
Practice Relating to Rule 161. International Cooperation in Criminal Proceedings
Section E. Cooperation with international criminal tribunals
In 2009, during the assembly of the States Parties to the 1998 ICC Statute, the representative of Mexico stated:
There is still much to do in order to ensure that the [International Criminal] Court is the efficient and effective tool for the fight against impunity that we envisaged in Rome in 1998. In the views of my delegation, the Court cannot be fully successful unless it can count on States’ commitments and support. Therefore, Mexico wishes to emphasize the urgent need for States to cooperate with the Court in accordance with their international obligations, including by fully complying with and carrying out all of the Court’s orders so that this judicial institution can comply efficiently and effectively with the mandate that it was given. 
Mexico, Statement during the 8th session of the Assembly of the States Parties to the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court, The Hague, 19 November 2009.
In 2009, during a debate in the UN Security Council on the Sudan, the permanent representative of Mexico stated:
The international community and the Security Council cannot remain passive in the face of situations such as that in Darfur, which to date has led up to 300,000 deaths and at least 2.5 million displaced people. Mexico therefore reiterates its call to the Security Council to demand … that it cooperate without delay with the International Criminal Court, that it undertake concrete actions to put an end to the escalation of violence and impunity in Darfur. 
Mexico, Statement by the permanent representative before the UN Security Council, 6130th meeting, UN Doc. S/PV.6130, 4 December 2009, pp. 7–8.
In 2010, during the general debate of the Review Conference of the 1998 ICC Statute, the Undersecretary for Foreign Affairs of Mexico stated:
At the internal level, we have fully assumed our obligation to cooperate with the [International Criminal] Court, responding in a timely and concise manner to all of its cooperation requests.
In this sense, it is my pleasure to announce that, last December, the Mexican Senate approved the draft Law for Cooperation with the International Criminal Court. Once approved by the Chamber of Deputies, such law will grant the national authorities the necessary faculties to attend all types of cooperation requests foreseen in the [1998] Rome Statute. 
Mexico, Statement by the Undersecretary for Foreign Affairs during the general debate of the Review Conference of the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court, Kampala, 31 May 2010, pp. 1–2.
In 2010, during a debate in the UN General Assembly on the Report of the International Criminal Court, the legal adviser of Mexico’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs stated:
[I]t is important to stress that refusal to cooperate with the [International Criminal] Court amounts to a clear violation of international obligations under the [1998] Rome Statute and, in certain circumstances, the [1945 UN] Charter itself. Non-cooperation thus requires that tough measures be taken by the Assembly of States Parties [to the Rome Statute] and, in some cases, by the Security Council. In that regard, Mexico considers it urgent to develop mechanisms that can effectively implement the provisions set out in article 87, paragraph 7, of the Statute. 
Mexico, Statement by the legal adviser of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs before the 65th session of the UN General Assembly, UN Doc A/65/PV.39, 28 October 2010, p. 24.
In 2010, during the assembly of the States Parties to the 1998 ICC Statute, the representative of Mexico stated:
Among the events with most impact on the work of the [International Criminal] Court, there are those related to lack of cooperation. In May [2010], the Court issued for the first time a formal decision informing the UN Security Council about the lack of cooperation of one State. It was followed, in August, by two notifications to such organ and to this Assembly regarding similar conducts by two States Parties.
Mexico reiterates its deep concern regarding the refusal of some States to cooperate with the International Criminal Court, in clear violation of the international obligations derived from the [1998] Rome Statute and, in certain cases, from the UN Charter. The international community cannot and should not remain oblivious to these manifest breaches, the sole purpose of which is to prolong impunity of the authors of the most serious crimes of international concern.
My delegation considers that these recent events evidence the urgent need for the Assembly to initiate, as soon as possible, a reflection on the tools or mechanisms that it requires in order to adopt measures in response of States’ lack of cooperation, so that its faculties set forth in articles 87.7 and 112.2 of the Rome Statute become fully effective. 
Mexico, Statement during the 9th session of the Assembly of the States Parties to the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court, New York, 6 December 2010.