Related Rule
Kenya
Practice Relating to Rule 7. The Principle of Distinction between Civilian Objects and Military Objectives
Kenya’s LOAC Manual (1997) provides: “Attacks are only to be directed against military objectives. Civilian objects are therefore to be spared, unless they are used for military purposes.” 
Kenya, Law of Armed Conflict, Military Basic Course (ORS), 4 Précis, The School of Military Police, 1997, Précis No. 2, p. 15; see also Précis No. 3, p. 14, and Précis No. 4, p. 1.
Kenya’s LOAC Manual (1997) provides that it is forbidden “to attack the civilian population, individual civilians or civilian objects as a deliberate method of warfare”. 
Kenya, Law of Armed Conflict, Military Basic Course (ORS), 4 Précis, The School of Military Police, 1997, Précis No. 4, p. 2.
Kenya’s LOAC Manual (1997) provides: “Specifically protected transport shall be allowed to pursue their assignment as long as needed. Their mission, contents and effective use may be verified by inspection (e.g. aircraft may be ordered to land for such inspection).” 
Kenya, Law of Armed Conflict, Military Basic Course (ORS), 4 Précis, The School of Military Police, 1997, Précis No. 3, p. 12.
The manual also states:
Subject to prohibitions and restrictions on access to national air space, foreign aircraft except enemy military aircraft may not be attacked. Foreign civilian aircraft may be attacked:
(a) when escorted by enemy military aircraft, or
(b) when flying alone under the conditions stated below.
Foreign civilian aircraft can be ordered to modify their route or to land or alight on water for inspection … If a foreign civilian aircraft refuses to modify its route or to land or alight on water, it may be attacked after due warning. The provisions of this part governing foreign civilian aircraft can be applied by analogy to neutral military aircraft. 
Kenya, Law of Armed Conflict, Military Basic Course (ORS), 4 Précis, The School of Military Police, 1997, Précis No. 4, pp. 10–11.