Related Rule
India
Practice Relating to Rule 93. Rape and Other Forms of Sexual Violence
India’s Protection of Children from Sexual Offences Act (2012), as amended, states:
D. - Aggravated sexual assault and punishment therefor
9. …
(b) whoever, being a member of the armed forces or security forces, commits sexual assault on a child–
(i) within the limits of the area to which the person is deployed; or
(ii) in any areas under the command of the security or armed forces; or
(iii) in the course of his duties or otherwise; or
(iv) where he is known or identified as a member of the security or armed forces; …
is said to commit aggravated sexual assault.
10. Whoever … commits aggravated sexual assault shall be punished with imprisonment of either description for a term which shall not be less than five years but which may extend to seven years, and shall also be liable to fine. 
India, Protection of Children from Sexual Offences Act, 2012, Articles 9–10.
India’s Criminal Law (Amendment) Act (2013) states:
Whoever,–
(c) being a member of the armed forces deployed in an area by the Central or a State Government commits rape in such area; …
Shall be punished with rigorous imprisonment for a term which shall not be less than ten years, but which may extend to imprisonment for the remainder of that person’s natural life, and shall also be liable to fine. 
India, Criminal Law (Amendment) Act, 2013, Article 376(2).
In 2008, in a statement during the 2008 Parliamentary Hearing at the United Nations, the representative of India stated:
Sexual violence against women and children is an unacceptable crime that unfortunately remains a serious modern-day challenge. India has taken note of [UN] Security Council Resolution 1820 of June 2008, which called for immediate and complete cessation of all acts of sexual violence against civilians by all parties to an armed conflict. Regrettably, instances of violence against women and children continue to rise, despite repeated and forthright international condemnation and an increase in collective efforts to stop such violence. It is a matter of great shame that in this day and age, women and girls remain victims of sexual violence, and are often targeted for such violence as part of an effort to humiliate, dominate, instill fear in, and eventually as a means to instigate forcible relocation of peoples. Such violence leaves permanent psychological scars in the victims, and in their societies.
There are adequate international legal agreements as well as domestic statutory laws that condemn such violence. No society or country can ever justify this practice. The fact that such violence persists is not due to the deficiency of legal measures to punish perpetrators. In our view, the problem lies in the implementation of such measures. 
India, Statement by the representative of India during the 2008 Parliamentary Hearing at the United Nations, “Session II: Sexual violence against women and children in armed conflict”, 20 November 2008.