Related Rule
India
Practice Relating to Rule 110. Treatment and Care of the Wounded, Sick and Shipwrecked
India’s Police Manual (1986) states: “Police should be ready to render First Aid to the injured and should make arrangements for the speedy transport of such injured persons to the hospital.” 
India, Police Manual for Handling Civil Disturbances, Home Ministry, Government of Maharashtra, Bombay, 1986, p. 39, Article 13(xvi).
India’s Army Training Note (1995) states: “On humanitarian grounds, medical help and care has to be provided to sick and wounded of even an enemy as laid down in [the] Geneva Conventions.” The manual explains that the denial of medical care is most likely to occur because of a shortage of medicine and doctors; because troops may give priority to their own wounded and sick; because wounded insurgents or terrorists may have themselves killed or injured armed forces personnel in an ambush or a raid; and because the sick and wounded may sympathize with or harbour insurgents or terrorists. The manual warns, however, that the denial of medical care may lead to allegations and charges of “(a) inhuman behaviour, (b) cruelty to fellow human beings, [or] (c) death due to the carelessness and negligence of Armed Forces personnel”. 
India, Army Training Note, Chief of Staff, Army Training Command, Ministry of Defence, Government of India, 1995, Appendix Y, § 5.
With respect to a situation where the armed forces are called upon to assist the civilian authorities, the manual states that, after firing, “immediate steps should be taken to succour the wounded rioters” and that “it is most important that the best possible arrangements for first aid, medical attention and evacuation to hospital of injured rioters are made”. 
India, Army Training Note, Chief of Staff, Army Training Command, Ministry of Defence, Government of India, 1995, p. 13, § 19(b).
According to the Report on the Practice of India, there is an obligation to provide immediate medical treatment to those who are injured in police firing. 
Report on the Practice of India, 1997, Chapter 5.1.